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S/L WILFRED STANLEY HERRING DSO, DFM

S/L WILFRED STANLEY HERRING DSO, DFM
Author: Franek Grabowski (Guest)
Time Stamp:
11:57:26 09 May 2003
Post:
Does anyone have anything more about this pilot? I've searched through the net and found just too many unrelated entries, nothing in my home library either.

Thanks

Franek


RE: S/L WILFRED STANLEY HERRING DSO, DFM
Author: HughAHalliday
Time Stamp:
13:15:40 09 May 2003
Post:
[font size="1" color="#FF0000"]LAST EDITED ON 09-May-03 AT 01:17 PM (GMT)[/font][p][font size="1" color="#FF0000"]LAST EDITED ON 09-May-03 AT 01:16%A0PM (GMT)[/font]

From the developing DSO data base:

HERRING, Wilfred Stanley, F/O, DFM (44709, Royal Air Force) - No.207 Squadron - Distinguished Service Order - awarded as per London Gazette dated 7 October 1941. Born in Edmonton, Scotland, 1914; educated at Brixton Day Continuation School. Enlisted 1939 and trained as a Sergeant Pilot. Awarded DFM, 22 November 1940 for services with No.44 Squadron (no published citation). Commissioned October 1940. Killed in action with No.571 Squadron, 4 July 1943. Text transcribed from Royal Air Force Quarterly.

"One night in September 1941, this officer was the captain of an aircraft which participated in an attack on Berlin. Whilst over the city the aircraft was repeatedly hit by shell fire from an intense and accurate barrage and, when Flying Officer Herring succeeded in evading the defences, the aircraft had sustained severe damage. The port engine had failed and, owing to lack of hydraulic power to the gun turret, the aircraft was almost defenceless. Nevertheless, Flying Officer Herring decided to attempt to fly the aircraft back to this country by the shortest route, which entailed passing over the enemy's most heavily defended areas. Overcoming many difficulties, he succeeded in reaching this country and landing safely at an aerodrome with practically no fuel left in the tanks.

"Throughout this officer displayed outstanding determination. On numerous occasions Flying Officer Herring has carried out attacks on the most heavily defended targets involving deep penetration into enemy territory, and has at all times displayed the greatest ability and devotion to duty."

Public Record Office Air 2/8462 has recommendation drafted 17 September 1941. He had flown 323 hours 19 minutes on operations, and 17 sorties on his second tour. The sortie list and original submission were as follows:

8 April 1941 - Kiel

12 April 1941 - Brest

5 May 1941 - Mannheim

8 May 1941 - Hamburg

9 May 1941 - Berlin

23 June 1941 - Dusseldorf

26 June 1941 - Kiel

6 July 1941 - Brest

14 July 1941 - Hanover

24 July 1941 - Kiel

27 July 1941 - Gardening and bombing Lennion

7 August 1941 - Essen

25 August 1941 - Mannheim

29 August 1941 - returned to base

31 August 1941 - Frankfurt

2 September 1941 - Berlin

7 September 1941 - Berlin

"Flying Officer Herring has now completed over 320 hours operational flying as the captain of Hampden and Manchester aircraft and he has always shown the utmost determination to carry through whatever operation he has been allocated. On numerous occasions this officer has been detailed to attack the most heavily defended targets involving deep penetrations into enemy territory, and in every instance he has completed his mission with a cool efficiency that has been a model to other aircrews.

"His resolute behaviour was particularly noticeable on the night of September 7th, when he was the captain of a Manchester which took part in a raid on Berlin. Whilst over the city the aeroplane was the target of intense and accurate anti-aircraft fire and repeated hits were received. Severe damage was sustained, including the seizure of the port engine owing to a punctured radiator. Flying Officer Herring feathered the port airscrew, dived out of the defences, sustaining more damage, and decided to attempt to fly the damaged aircraft to England. This decision was taken with the full knowledge that the flight would necessarily have to be made during a full moon by the shortest route which would entail passing through the thickest part of the enemy searchlight belt and fighter areas. At this time he was also aware that, following the failure of the port engine, there was no hydraulic power to the gun turrets and that the aeroplane was almost defenceless.

"The return flight was made successfully at about 5,000 feet. The aircraft encountered cloud at the most critical part of the flight and consequent on severe icing conditions was forced to fly below cloud across the main enemy searchlight area.

"On arrival back in England, a successful landing was made at an aerodrome with practically no fuel left in the tanks.

"The decision to make a return flight in the face of all the known and unknown hazards show that this officer possesses the finest type of courage and determination and the manner in which the flight was executed demonstrates his skill and efficiency as a pilot and captain of a heavy bomber.

"The modest demeanour, ability and devotion to duty of this officer has done an immense amount towards raising the confidence of flying crews in the capabilities of Manchester aircraft."


RE: S/L WILFRED STANLEY HERRING DSO, DFM
Author: Franek Grabowski (Guest)
Time Stamp:
06:09:54 11 May 2003
Post:
Hugh, thanks a lot for this.

A correction though - Herring was a 2nd pilot (Eduard Prchal being 1st) of Liberator AL523 of 511 Sqn (CWGC says of Herring - 104 O.T.U. attd. 511 Sqdn). Aircraft with Polish PM gen. Sikorski on board crashed just after take off from Gibraltar. Herring was one of the few, bodies of whom were never found. There're substantiated claims it was actually assasination.

Franek


RE: S/L WILFRED STANLEY HERRING DSO, DFM
Author: Fairlop
Time Stamp:
06:41:24 12 May 2003
Post:
Franek,

An old issue of %84After the Battle" magazine (what ?) described the Sikorski%B4s crash. I believe some words were writed about your co-pilot.

Regards,

Michal


RE: S/L WILFRED STANLEY HERRING DSO, DFM
Author: Franek Grabowski (Guest)
Time Stamp:
11:06:49 13 May 2003
Post:
Thanks, I'm awared of the article and will get a copy within few days.

Best wishes

Franek