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Wellington R1408

Wellington R1408
Author: Gildas (Guest)
Time Stamp:
20:31:54 Thursday, January 5, 2006
Post:
Hello dear friends,

I took part, yesterday with some friends, to the excavation of remains from 149 RAF Sqn Wellington R1408 OJ-J. Itís a long time we know the field where it crashed, on Plouzan commune, 10 km west of Brest on the night of 1-2 July 1941.

We discovered what may be a part of the dinghy, some part of the engine as valves, %85, but also three bombs !

Would a lot appreciate to know the bombs types and numbers, so to inform the disposal personnal about what else may be found, now that we let them know about those we saw. Maybe someone would have the ORB form 540 or others.

What would be the precise type of engine, (Bristol Pegasus XVIII ?), of guns (Vickers K guns or Browning, number and position), on this Wellington IC. Some may be found

May someone confirm it was built by Chester as the 6th produc. order, 3rd prod. batch

We found three stainless steel hooks we think that may be bombs hooks. Marked A1080, VAD, and B 7632 on one.

Thanks in advance

Gildas



RE: Wellington R1408
Author: Chris Charland (Guest)
Time Stamp:
22:38:28 Thursday, January 5, 2006
Post:
Hi Gildas

Wellington Mk. IC s/n R1408 was one of 550 aircraft ordered from Chester under Contract 992424/39. Chester was a shadow factory built under government sponsorship.

The Wellington Mk. IC was powered by the Bristol Pegasus XVIII.

The Wellington Mk. IC carried six belt-fed Browning .303 machine guns. They replaced the drum-fed Vickers 'K' gun. A pair of machine guns were located in both a front and rear Fraser-Nash turrets. There were two additional beam guns (starboard and port side) in place of the 'dust bin'.

The Wellington Mk. IC could carry up to 4,500 pounds of ordanance including the standard 250 pound bomb, the 1,000 pounder and incendiary cases. You could mix up your bomb load depending on the operation. I can't tell you much about sea mines.

Cheers...Chris



RE: Wellington R1408
Author: Gildas (Guest)
Time Stamp:
15:26:59 Sunday, February 5, 2006
Post:
thanks a lot Chris,

One or two other very basic questions I suppose, but I'm unable to bring any answer to it, could the crew (pilot or bomb aimer)select the number and type of bomb they wanted to drop. I mean, could they drop for example only one 250 lbs and one 500 lbs together, and later only one 250 lbs, and again later, another one ?

And what type of belt fed the Browning gun ?

Cheers

Gildas


RE: Wellington R1408
Author: Bill G. (Guest)
Time Stamp:
18:59:27 Sunday, February 5, 2006
Post:
Gildas,

The term "belt-fed" can be a bit misleading. Each round of ammunition was joined to the next by a metal clip, thus forming a "belt".

It would be possible to release bombs in whatever sequence was desirable by use of the bomb selector switches on a panel in the bomb-aimer's position. Usually it was used to arrange the releasing of the bombs in a set sequence to preserve the trim of the aircraft.

Bill.


RE: Wellington R1408
Author: Gildas (Guest)
Time Stamp:
15:26:23 Sunday, March 5, 2006
Post:
well received, thank you Bill!