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Station BALLYHALBERT

Station BALLYHALBERT
Author: Phil Listemann (Guest)
Time Stamp:
13:04:39 Monday, July 30, 2007
Post:
Hello,

Does anybody can tell me if, during WW2 and by 1943, the RAF Station of Ballyhalbert, located in Northern Ireland was depending on any of the following 13 Group Sectors (Catterick, Ouston, Turnhouse, Ayr) or on RAF Northern Ireland?

Thanks

Phil (www.raf-in-combat.com)



RE: Station BALLYHALBERT
Author: Resmoroh
Time Stamp:
14:42:14 Monday, July 30, 2007
Post:
Phil, Hi,

This is an interesting one. Nobody seems to want to play with you, so while listening to the cricket commentary I had a quick trawl round the net. Bit of a mixed bag - but posted for you to look at.

Willis & Hollis state (assumed to be at 1 Dec 44) that Ballyhalbert was a Training School in RAF N Ireland Command. Must have been fairly big for, if their personnel figures are correct, there were 2736 RAF/WAAF on site. Google (RAF Stations.kmz) states "May 41 Opened in Fighter Command, Jul 41 Sector Ops Room HMS Corncrake (i.e. RNAS Ballyhalbert), Nov 45 C & M, 1947 closed" - but I have no idea where their info came from. First CO (from rafweb) was Wg Cdr H D McGregor in Jun 41 (who ended up as an Air Marshal). He then becomes SASO 82 (Fighter) Group later in 1941. The Control Towers site says it opened in Jun 41 as an OTU, and shows a pic of what looks like an RAF Church Parade dated 1943.

(from http://uk.msnusers.com/ballyhalbert/rafballyhalbert.msnw) When the Second World War broke out, Ballyhalbert was one of around 25 sites in Northern Ireland chosen to be an RAF Airfield. Construction began in 1940 and the Windmill Stump at Clydesburn was demolished during the process. The airfield was officially opened on 28th June 1941.Over the years Ballyhalbert saw service from RAF, WAAF and Royal Navy personnel. Servicemen from Australia, New Zealand, Canada, America and Poland also saw duty at Ballyhalbert. A short distance away from Ballyhalbert Airfield in two local Churchyards lie Canadian, Australian and Polish men who died whilst serving at Ballyhalbert.

(from http://www.fleetairarmarchive.net/Aircraft/Airstations/FAAAirStationsHomepage.htm). Ballyhalbert (HMS Corncake), Ballyhalbert, Co Down, Northern Ireland (1941-1945). Operational RAF Fighter Command, joined by USAAF autumn 1942. Was used by FAA as lodger facilities from RAF Northern Ireland. Transferred to Admiralty and commissioned 1945. Used for No 4 Naval Air Fighter School. Paid off end 1945.

You pays your money and you takes your choice.

HTH

Peter Davies



RE: Station BALLYHALBERT
Author: Chris Charland (Guest)
Time Stamp:
15:22:57 Monday, July 30, 2007
Post:
Hi Phil

For what it is worth, as of October 1944, it was still an R.A.F. Station administered by R.A.F.N.I. (H.Q. at Kirkstown).

Postal Address: Kircubbin County, Down, Northern Ireland

Telegraphc Address: Aeronautics, Ballyhalbert

Telephone Number: Ballyhalbert, 240

There were no units assigned to R.A.F. Station Ballyhalbert at that time.

Source: Geographical Index of R.A.F. Units - October 1944 (Amended to September 23rd 1944)

Cheers...Chris


RE: Station BALLYHALBERT
Author: Lyffe
Time Stamp:
16:10:38 Monday, July 30, 2007
Post:
Phil,

1402 Met Flight transferred to Ballyhalbert from Aldergrove on 1.12.1944, but regret I know nothing of any other RAF units. 1402 Met Flight returned to Aldergrove in August 1945 where, a month later, it was absorbed by 518 Squadron.

1402 Met Flight and 518 Sqn were both Coastal Command).

(Sources 'RAF Flying Training and Support Units' and 'Even the birds were walking')

Brian


RE: Station BALLYHALBERT
Author: Phil Listemann (Guest)
Time Stamp:
16:18:40 Monday, July 30, 2007
Post:
Many thanks Peter and Chris for these valuable information. I will decide in favour of RAFNI, which seems to be the most logical, Fighter Command having nothing to defend in this area in 1943.

Phil