RAF and Commonwealth Air Forces Awards
Database :: Awards

RAF and Commonwealth Air Forces Awards

This is a database of all commonwealth airforces Awards in the Second World War. Database developed with help of Malcolm Barrass and Jagan Pillarisetti. DSO listing provided by Hugh Halliday. Citations sourced from the London Gazette Website. Medal Ribbons from Wikipedia.

In this context we recommend reference books that include Honour the Air Forces by Michael Maton, The Distinguished Flying Cross and How It Was Won 1918-1945 by Nick Carter and Carol Carter, The Distinguished Flying Medal: A record of courage, 1918-1982 by I. T Tavender

There are a total of 65495 Award records in this database. Your query returns 65495 records

Award Name Number Date/Year/Month Unit Force
VC : 30 GC : 20 EGM(M) : 8 DSO : 1222 DFC : 20927 MC : 85 AFC : 2481 CGM(F) : 107 DFM : 6484 MM : 131 AFM : 292 MiD : 33708
DateAwardRankName (Number)UnitRibbon
1920-04-01DSOFlt LtWalter Fraser ANDERSON 47 Sqdn
Flt. Lt. Walter Fraser Anderson (Pilot) Observer Officer John Mitchell (Observer), " C " Flight, 47th Squadron. On 30th July, 1919, near Cherni Yar (Volga), these' officers were '-pilot and observer respectively, on a D.H. 9 machine, which descended to an .altitude of 1,000 feet to take oblique photographs of the enemy's 'positions. A second machine of the same flight which followed as escort was completely disabled by machine-gun fire, and forced to land five miles behind the enemy's foremost troops. Parties of hostile cavalry which attempted to capture the pilot and observer of the crashed machine were kept away by the observer's Lewis gun whilst the pilot burnt the machine. Flight Lieut. Anderson, notwithstanding that his petrol tank had been pierced by a machine-gun bullet, landed alongside the wrecked aeroplane, picked up the pilot and observer, and got safely home. The risk involved in attempting this gallant rescue was very great, as had any accident occurred in landing £be fate of all four officers can only be conjectured. The difficult circumstances of the rescue will be fully appreciated when it is remembered that Observer Officer Mitchell had to mount the port plane to stop the holes in the petrol tank with his thumbs for. a period of fifty minutes' flying on the return journey. London Gazette No. 31847, Dated 1920-04-01
1920-04-01DSOFg OffrSamuel Marcus KINKEAD 47 Sqdn
Flying Officer Samuel Marcus Kirikeady D.S.C., D.F.C. (late H.L. Irif. and R.N.A.S.), " A " Detachment: On 12tih October, 1919, near Kotluban, this officer led a formation of Garnet machines and attacked the Cavalry Division of Dumenko. By skilful tactics in low flying he dispersed this force, which had turned the left flank of the Caucasian Army, and threatened to jeopardise the whole defence of Tzaritzin. Flying Officer Kinkead has carried out similar attacks.on enemy troops, batteries, camps and transport with great success and at considerable personal risk . Previous awards:—D.S. Cross 22.2.1918, Bar to D.S. Cross 26,4.1918, D.F. Cross' 3.8.1918, Bar to D.F. Cross 2.11.1918 (201st Squadron, France). London Gazette No. 31847, Dated 1920-04-01
1920-04-01DSOPlt OffrJohn MITCHELL 47 Sqdn
Flt. Lt. Walter Fraser Anderson (Pilot) Observer Officer John Mitchell (Observer), " C " Flight, 47th Squadron. On 30th July, 1919, near Cherni Yar (Volga), these' officers were '-pilot and observer respectively, on a D.H. 9 machine, which descended to an .altitude of 1,000 feet to take oblique photographs of the enemy's 'positions. A second machine of the same flight which followed as escort was completely disabled by machine-gun fire, and forced to land five miles behind the enemy's foremost troops. Parties of hostile cavalry which attempted to capture the pilot and observer of the crashed machine were kept away by the observer's Lewis gun whilst the pilot burnt the machine. Flight Lieut. Anderson, notwithstanding that his petrol tank had been pierced by a machine-gun bullet, landed alongside the wrecked aeroplane, picked up the pilot and observer, and got safely home. The risk involved in attempting this gallant rescue was very great, as had any accident occurred in landing £be fate of all four officers can only be conjectured. The difficult circumstances of the rescue will be fully appreciated when it is remembered that Observer Officer Mitchell had to mount the port plane to stop the holes in the petrol tank with his thumbs for. a period of fifty minutes' flying on the return journey. London Gazette No. 31847, Dated 1920-04-01
1920-04-01DSOFg OffrSydney Gilbert FROGLEY 47 Sqdn
Flying Officer Sydney Gilbert Frogley, D.F.C., " A " Detachment (3/R. Berks). A fleet of about forty Bolshevik vessels,, armed with all descriptions of guns, having broken through the defences of the Volunteer Army, commenced a bombardment of T'zaritzin. Flying Officer Frogley led a formation of machines on 15th October, 1919, and at a height of 1,000 feet dropped his bombs with such effect that the fleet was dispersed several vessels having been destroyed. During a period of four months, this officer has rendered invaluable services in South Russia. , (The award of Distinguished, Flying Cross is also announced in this Gazette:') London Gazette No. 31847, Dated 1920-04-01
1920-07-12DSOFg OffrHorace Percy LALE
1920-07-20DSOFlt LtJohn William Boldero GRIGSON
1923-05-23DSOMajorArthur EB PARSONS
1924-06-11DSOSqn LdrEdye Rollston MANNING
1925-11-20DSOSqn LdrArthur John CAPEL
1926-05-28DSOSqn LdrJames Milne ROBB
1928-03-23DSOSqn LdrFrancis H COLEMAN 30 Sqdn
1931-06-23DSOSqn LdrGeorge C GARDINER 55 Sqdn
1933-10-06DSOBarISqn LdrMatthew Brown FREW
1936-05-08DSOSqn LdrKenneth Harries RIVERSDALE-ELLIOT 27 Sqdn
1936-11-06DSOSqn LdrHerbert Martin MASSEY
1937-12-10DSOWg CdrJohn Cotesworth SLESSOR
1937-12-21DSOGp CaptNorman Howard BOTTOMLEY
1937-12-21DSOWg CdrAlan LEES
1938-04-03DSOFlt LtJohn Francis Tufnell BARRETT
1938-05-06DSOSqn LdrEric Ralph C HOBSON
1938-08-16DSOWg CdrBurton ANKERS 3 Wing
1938-09-13DSOSqn LdrBasil Edward EMBRY (9252)20 Sqdn
1939-02-28DSOSqn LdrNoel Christie SINGER (28057)6 Sqdn
The KING has been graciously pleased to approve of the undermentioned reward for gallant and distinguished service rendered in Palestine London Gazette No. 34603, Dated 1939-02-28
1939-03-28DSOBarIWg CdrJohn Francis Tufnell BARRETT 8 Sqdn
The KING has been graciously pleased to approve of the undermentioned rewards in recognition of gallant and distinguished services in the Aden Protectorate London Gazette No. 34611, Dated 1939-03-28
1939-03-28DSOFg OffrRobert C WADDELL
Notification only London Gazette No. 34611, Dated 1939-03-28
1939-10-10DFCActg Flt LtKenneth Christopher DORAN (37467)110 Sqdn
Flying Officer (acting Flight Lieutenant) Kenneth Christopher DORAN (37467) Early in September, 1939, this officer led an attack against an enemy cruiser. In face of heavy gun fire and under extremely bad weather conditions he pressed home a successful low attack with great determination. London Gazette No. 34705, Dated 1939-10-10
1939-10-10DFCFg OffrAndrew McPHERSON (39200)139 Sqdn
Flying Officer Andrew McPHERSON (39200). This officer carried out reconnaissance flights early in September, 1939. On one occasion he was forced by extremely bad weather conditions to fly close to the enemy coast at very low altitudes. These flights made possible a successful raid on enemy naval forces. London Gazette No. 34705, Dated 1939-10-10
1939-11-03DFCActg Flt LtJohn BARRETT (37341)204 Sqdn
Flying Officer (acting Flight Lieutenant) John BARRETT (37341). Acting Flight Lieutenant SMITH and acting Flight Lieutenant BARRETT were, respectively, in command of the first and second of three flying boats which, having intercepted messages from a torpedoed merchant ship in September, 1939, proceeded to the scene of the sinking ship (some 70 miles from the mainland) to undertake rescue work. A lifeboat was seen in the vicinity containing about 34 men and, as no submarine could be sighted, the first aircraft alighted and took on board 20 of the survivors. A thorough search for enemy submarines was made by the second aircraft which afterwards alighted and, in spite of the heavy swell, took on board the remaining survivors from the lifeboat. London Gazette No. 34724, Dated 1939-11-03
1939-11-03DFCActg Flt LtThurston Meiggs Wetherall SMITH (39621)228 Sqdn
Flying Officer (acting Flight Lieutenant) Thurston Meiggs Wetherall SMITH (39621). Acting Flight Lieutenant SMITH and acting Flight Lieutenant BARRETT were, respectively, in command of the first and second of three flying boats which, having intercepted messages from a torpedoed merchant ship in September, 1939, proceeded to the scene of the sinking ship (some 70 miles from the mainland) to undertake rescue work. A lifeboat was seen in the vicinity containing about 34 men and, as no submarine could be sighted, the first aircraft alighted and took on board 20 of the survivors. A thorough search for enemy submarines was made by the second aircraft which afterwards alighted and, in spite of the heavy swell, took on board the remaining survivors from the lifeboat. London Gazette No. 34724, Dated 1939-11-03
1939-11-03DFMSgtWilliam Edward WILLITS (527769)269 Sqdn
Sergeant WILLITS was the second pilot and navigator of an aircraft engaged in combat with an enemy flying boat in September, 1939. When, during an attack, the pilot had been shot through the head and had collapsed over the control column, this airman, in spite of the pilot's inertness and the extremely low altitude, succeeded in obtaining control of the aircraft. After the dead pilot had been moved entirely clear of the controls Sergeant WILLITS piloted and navigated the aircraft back to the base, a distance of about 140 miles. The airman's skill and presence of mind undoubtedly saved the aircraft and the Jives of the other members of the crew. London Gazette No. 34724, Dated 1939-11-03
1939-11-14EGM(M)SgtFrederick Henry GARDINER (517540)
In September, 1939, the aircraft in which Sergeant Gardiner was air observer was. attacked by enemy aircraft and seriouslydamaged. Two petrol tanks were punctured and despite the fumes and much bleeding from a slight gunshot wound over the right eye, this airman continued his duties, and succeeded in setting an accurate course to the base. The aircraft caught fire on landing and, although his clothes were alight, Sergeant Gardiner commenced to extinguishthe burning clothing of the wireless operator by rolling him on the ground, and beating the flames with his hands. Not until his efforts were successful did he attend to his own clothing London Gazette No. 34733, Dated 1939-11-14
1939-11-14EGM(M)Fg OffrReginald Cubitt GRAVELEY (39315)88 Sqdn
This officer displayed great gallantry and a total disregard of his own safety when the aircraft of which he was the pilot was shot down by an enemy fighter in September, 1939, and crashed in flames. Though badly burned, he pulled his wounded air observer from the wreckage to a place of safety and then returned to rescue the air gunner. He found the airman dead, however, and was unable to lift him from the cockpit. London Gazette No. 34733, Dated 1939-11-14
1939-11-28DFCSqn LdrPhilip Reginald BARWELL (22062)46 Sqdn
Squadron Leader Philip Reginald BARWELL (22062). During October, 1939, this officer led a flight of six aircraft over the North Sea to intercept enemy bomber aircraft which were approaching a British convoy about 30 miles from the mainland. After shooting down the first enemy aircraft himself he renewed the attack and, in collaboration with two other pilots of the flight, succeeded in destroying a second aeroplane. The engagement ultimately resulted in at least six, and possibly seven, of the nine raiding aircraft being brought down into the sea and its success was very largely due to the high standard of gallantry and leadership displayed by Squadron Leader BARWELL. London Gazette No. 34742, Dated 1939-11-28
1939-11-28DFCFlt LtPatrick GIFFORD (90188)603 Sqdn
Flight Lieutenant Patrick GIFFORD, Auxiliary Air Force (90188). During October, 1939, this officer, leading a section of his squadron, sighted an enemy bomber over the mainland heading towards the sea at high speed. Flight Lieutenant GIFFORD led the attack with skill, daring and determination, and as the result of a final burst of firing from his own guns the enemy aircraft crashed into the sea. Later in October, 1939, this officer's section intercepted a bomber apparently engaged in reconnoitring a British convoy. The enemy aircraft attempted to take cover in the clouds but Flight Lieutenant GIFFORD led his section after it, firing short bursts as opportunity offered. The pursuit continued some eleven miles out to sea where the raider, showing signs of having been hit, turned and crashed into the sea. London Gazette No. 34742, Dated 1939-11-28
1939-11-28DFCFlt LtGeorge Cannon PINKERTON (90160)602 Sqdn
Flight Lieutenant George Cannon PINKERTON, Auxiliary Air Force (90160). During October, 1939, Flight Lieutenant PINKERTON, leading a section of his squadron, engaged an enemy bomber. The aircraft attempted to take refuge in the clouds, but with great skill and initiative Flight Lieutenant PINKERTON led his patrol in pursuit and, with total disregard of danger, brought his guns to bear from a distance of fifty yards, causing the enemy aircraft to crash into the sea. London Gazette No. 34742, Dated 1939-11-28
1940-01-02DFCSqn LdrHarry BROADHURST (24035)111 Sqdn
Squadron Leader Harry BROADHURST, A.F.C. (24035). This officer was in command of the duty Squadron at an East coast aerodrome during November, 1939, when he was informed of an approaching enemy aircraft. He stated that the weather conditions were unfit for formation-flying and yet, despite the rain and clouds at ground-level, he took off alone, flying blind by means of instruments. Emerging above the cloud and endeavouring to clear an iced-up windscreen, he sighted the enemy aircraft. Squadron Leader Broadhurst attacked and caused it to turn on its side and dive vertically into cloud close to sea level. In following it down he narrowly escaped from crashing into the sea. On his return weather conditions had not improved, and it was only at the third attempt that he was able to regain his aerodrome London Gazette No. 34765, Dated 1940-01-02
1940-01-02DFCActg Wg CdrJohn Francis GRIFFITHS (24037)99 Sqdn
Squadron Leader (Acting Wing Commander) John Francis GRIFFITHS (24037). During December, 1939, in spite of adverse weather and strong enemy opposition by anti-aircraft guns and enemy fighters, this officer led his squadron of 12 aircraft, and parried out a successful reconnaissance over strong naval enemy forces. The determination with which he pressed home this reconnaissance enabled him to bring back information of vital importance. In the course of this operation his formation accounted for no less than 5 enemy aircraft. By his personal example and thoroughness, he has been largely instrumental in maintaining his unit's high standard of efficiency. London Gazette No. 34765, Dated 1940-01-02
1940-01-02DFCPlt OffrSelby Roger HENDERSON (40826)206 Sqdn
Pilot Officer Selby Roger HENDERSON (40826). During November, 1939, when pilot of a reconnaissance aircraft on duty over the North Sea, Pilot Officer Henderson encountered two large enemy flying boats. He engaged the leading boat with the utmost resolution; bursts were seen to enter the engines and after-part of the flying boat's hull, the enemy rear gunner was incapacitated and eventually the flying boat went down partially out of control. Pilot Officer Henderson then attacked the second enemy aircraft with equal determination and silenced its fire before exhausting all his ammunition. London Gazette No. 34765, Dated 1940-01-02
1940-01-02DFCPlt OffrFrank Hugh LONG (36190)102 Sqdn
Pilot Officer Frank Hugh LONG (36190). Pilot Officer Gray and Pilot Officer Long were respectively Pilot and Navigator on a night reconnaissance flight over enemy territory during November, 1939. During the operations a snowstorm was encountered and the aircraft became badly iced-up, in addition to being subjected to anti-aircraft fire. Nevertheless the reconnaissance flight was continued but it was not found possible to reach the objective as eventually weather conditions rendered the aircraft practically impossible to control, the upper surface of one wing and half that of the other wing having been stripped of fabric and one flap jammed down. The wireless apparatus also failed. The journey home involved a flight of 342 miles over the sea during very heavy rainstorms and it was mainly due to the skill, courage and splendid team work of Pilot Officer GRAY and Pilot Officer LONG that the aircraft and crew were brought safely back. London Gazette No. 34765, Dated 1940-01-02
1940-01-02DFCPlt OffrKenneth Neil GRAY (40342)102 Sqdn
Pilot Officer Kenneth Neil GRAY (40342). Pilot Officer Gray and Pilot Officer Long were respectively Pilot and Navigator on a night reconnaissance flight over enemy territory during November, 1939. During the operations a snowstorm was encountered and the aircraft became badly iced-up, in addition to being subjected to anti-aircraft fire. Nevertheless the reconnaissance flight was continued but it was not found possible to reach the objective as eventually weather conditions rendered the aircraft practically impossible to control, the upper surface of one wing and half that of the other wing having been stripped of fabric and one flap jammed down. The wireless apparatus also failed. The journey home involved a flight of 342 miles over the sea during very heavy rainstorms and it was mainly due to the skill, courage and splendid team work of Pilot Officer GRAY and Pilot Officer LONG that the aircraft and crew were brought safely back. London Gazette No. 34765, Dated 1940-01-02
1940-01-02DFMCplAlexander BICKERSTAFF (563040)99 Sqdn
During operations over enemy territory in December, 1939, this airman, as tail gunner, maintained a steady and accurate fire at all enemy aircraft that came within range. He himself shot down one Messerschmidt. This aircraft engaged the leader's aircraft at extremely close range. Corporal Bickerstaff quickly brought his guns to bear and directed a cool and accurate fire, his tracer being seen to pass directly through the pilot's position before the enemy aircraft burst into flames and crashed into the sea. London Gazette No. 34765, Dated 1940-01-02
1940-01-02DFMCplCedric Charles PETTIT (562595)99 Sqdn
During operations over enemy territory in December, 1939, this airman, when acting as tail gunner in the leading aircraft of the second section, engaged all enemy aircraft that came within range. He brought a welldirected cross fire to bear on aircraft attacking the leading formation, in addition to engaging the enemy during their attacks on another section. He remained absolutely steady throughout the action, his standard of fire discipline being of the highest order London Gazette No. 34765, Dated 1940-01-02
1940-01-02DFMLACJohn James COPLEY (521256)38 Sqdn
Leading Aircraftman Copley was the tail air gunner in an aircraft taking part in a raid over enemy territory during December, 1939. When his aircraft became isolated from the formation and was attacked by an enemy fighter aircraft from astern he opened' fire at a range of approximately 150-200 yards, subsequently getting in at least two bursts of 20 rounds each at point blank range, causing the aircraft to pull, into a climbing turn, stall and dive out of control. During this engagement Leading Aircraftman Copley's aircraft was hit in numerous vital places by enemy bullets, and yet despite the fact that he himself was injured by the gunfire from the attacking aircraft, he maintained control of his fire and manipulation of the gun turret, setting a very high standard for other air gunners. London Gazette No. 34765, Dated 1940-01-02
1940-01-16DFCPlt OffrCedric Alan Sykes GREENHILL (40906)206 Sqdn
Pilot Officer Cedric Alan Sykes GREENHILL. (40906) Pilot Officer Greenhill and Aircraftman Britton were respectively pilot and rear gunner of an Anson aircraft which, whilst on reconnaissance duty over the North Sea during November, 1939, was attacked by a Heinkel seaplane. Pilot Officer Greenhill returned the attack and, by using the manoeuvrability of his aircraft to the full, gradually took the initiative, Aircraftman Britton showing his ability by firing whenever possible. The enemy aircraft was finally shot down by Pilot Officer Greenhill in delivering a short burst, from his. front gun. London Gazette No. 34773, Dated 1940-01-16
1940-01-16DFCActg Wg CdrRichard KELLETT (16177)149 Sqdn
Squadron Leader (Acting Wing Commander) Richard KELLETT, A.F.C. (16177). This officer displayed courage, coolness and determination in. leading his squadron and a combined formation of; aircraft in operations over an enemy naval base in December, 1939, which resulted in the infliction of heavy casualties on enemy aircraft. London Gazette No. 34773, Dated 1940-01-16
1940-01-16DFMAC1Leonard James BRITTON (519168)206 Sqdn
Awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. Pilot Officer Cedric Alan Sykes GREENHILL. (40906)-. Awarded the Distinguished Flying Medal. 519168 Aircraftman, ist Class, Leonard James BRITTON. Pilot Officer Greenhill and Aircraftman Britton were respectively pilot and rear gunner of an Anson aircraft which, whilst on reconnaissance duty oyer the North Sea during November, 1939, was attacked by a. Heinkel seaplane. Pilot Officer Greenhill returned the attack and, by using the manoeuvrability of his aircraft to the full,, gradually took the initiative,. Aircraftman Britton showing his ability by firijig whenever possible. The enemy aircraft was finally shot down by Pilot Officer Greenhill in delivering a short burst, from his. front gun. London Gazette No. 34773, Dated 1940-01-16
1940-01-16DFMAC1Charles Ronald DRIVER (626742)9 Sqdn
Aircraftman Driver was the front gunner in an aircraft engaged in operations over an enemy naval base in December, 1939. Although the aircraft was subjected to very heavy fire he remained at his post until both the front guns were put out of action and the flooring shot away or in flames, which he extinguished with his hands. As by this time the petrol system had been severely damaged, he proceeded to the hand petrol pump, and continued manual pumping until shortage of petrol caused the aircraft to land in the sea. Despite these exertions, Aircraftman Driver subsequently succeeded in launching the dinghy and assisted in saving the remainder of the crew, some of whom were wounded. It is undoubtedly largely due to his alertness that the members of the crew of this aircraft were brought to safety. London Gazette No. 34773, Dated 1940-01-16
1940-01-16DFMAC1James John MULLINEAUX (547644)149 Sqdn
This aircraftman was rear gunner in an aircraft of a formation which carried out operations over an enemy naval base in December, 1939. In spite of heavy enemy anti-aircraft fire and repeated attacks he displayed great courage and coolness, bringing down, by his well-controlled and accurate marksmanship, one enemy fighter in flames and, in conjunction with his under turret gunner, destroying a second aircraft. London Gazette No. 34773, Dated 1940-01-16
1940-01-19DFCPlt OffrGarth Wells Fuller CAREY (36169)220 Sqdn
Awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. Pilot Officer Garth Wells Fuller CAREY (36169). Awarded the Distinguished Flying Medal. 525122 Leading Aircraftman Rex Arthur CRUMPTON. Pilot Officer Carey and Leading Aircraftman Crumpton were respectively pilot and air gunner of one of three aircraft carrying out a patrol over the North Sea in January, 1940, when two enemy aircraft were encountered. Pilot Officer Carey opened fire at very close range, and was successful in driving the first enemy machine, in flames, into the sea. He then engaged the second enemy aircraft until he had exhausted his front gun ammunition, and by his skilful manoeuvring enabled Leading Aircraftman Crumpton to bring his gun into action at point blank range, inflicting considerable damage. The skill and coolness displayed-by Leading Aircraftman Crumpton in the manipulation of his guns played a large part in bringing the combat to a successful conclusion. London Gazette No. 34776, Dated 1940-01-19
1940-01-19DFMLACRex Arthur CRUMPTON (525122)220 Sqdn
Awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. Pilot Officer Garth Wells Fuller CAREY (36169). Awarded the Distinguished Flying Medal. 525122 Leading Aircraftman Rex Arthur CRUMPTON. Pilot Officer Carey and Leading Aircraftman Crumpton were respectively pilot and air gunner of one of three aircraft carrying out a patrol over the North Sea in January, 1940, when two enemy aircraft were encountered. Pilot Officer Carey opened fire at very close range, and was successful in driving the first enemy machine, in flames, into the sea. He then engaged the second enemy aircraft until he had exhausted his front gun ammunition, and by his skilful manoeuvring enabled Leading Aircraftman Crumpton to bring his gun into action at point blank range, inflicting considerable damage. The skill and coolness displayed-by Leading Aircraftman Crumpton in the manipulation of his guns played a large part in bringing the combat to a successful conclusion. London Gazette No. 34776, Dated 1940-01-19

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