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Wg Cdr Geoffrey Leonard CHESHIRE (72021) of the RAFVR


Awards for Wg Cdr Geoffrey Leonard CHESHIRE (72021), RAFVR

DateAwardRankName (Number)UnitRibbon
1940-12-06DSOPlt OffrGeoffrey Leonard CHESHIRE (72021)102 Sqdn
Pilot Officer Cheshire and Sergeant Davidson were the captain and wireless operator respectively, in an aircraft detailed to attack a target near Cologne one night in November, 1940. During a lull, following half-an-hour's intense and accurate antiaircraft fire, a photographic flare was about to be dropped from a height of 8,000 feet, when it was detonated by a piece of shrapnel causing a blinding explosion in the fuselage and front turret. The cockpit was filled with black fumes and fire broke out. Sergeant Davidson was dazed by the explosion, his face and hands were badly burned and his clothing was set on fire. Snowing great coolness Pilot Officer Cheshire regained control of his aircraft, which had lost considerable height and was being subjected to intense anti-aircraft fire and although the explosion had blown out a considerable part of the fuselage and caused other damage, he finally succeeded in regaining height. When the fire was extinguished, Sergeant Davidson's injuries were so severe that he was unable to see. In spite of this he persuaded the rear gunner to guide his burned fingers to the wireless controls as he called out the settings, a process which was continued until it was realised the wireless was useless. Despite his intense suffering, Sergeant Davidson displayed great courage and fortitude by consistently refusing to be landed at a station nearer than base. Although the aircraft was only partially answering to controls, Pilot Officer Cheshire succeeded in regaining his aerodrome. He displayed great courage, determination and leadership throughout. London Gazette No. 35009, Dated 1940-12-06
1941-03-07DFCFg OffrGeoffrey Leonard CHESHIRE (72021)102 Sqdn
Notification only London Gazette No. 35097, Dated 1941-03-07
1943-04-20DSOBarWg CdrGeoffrey Leonard CHESHIRE (72021)76 Sqdn
Notification Only London Gazette No. 35983, Dated 1943-04-20
1944-04-18DSOBarIIWg CdrGeoffrey Leonard CHESHIRE (72021)617 Sqdn
This officer has commanded the squadron with notable success.. Within, recent months he has participated in many attacks Oh targets of vital importance to the enemy and the successes obtained are an Excellent tribute to his outstanding tactical ability great courage and iron determination. He is a splendid leader, whose personal example and untiring efforts have contributed in a large measure to the high standard of efficiency and fine fighting qualities ol the squadron he commands. London Gazette No. 36475, Dated 1944-04-18
1944-09-08VCWg CdrGeoffrey Leonard CHESHIRE (72021)617 Sqdn
Air Ministry, 8th September, 1944. The KING 'has been graciously pleased to confer the VICTORIA CROSS on the undermentioned officer in recognition of most conspicuous bravery: — Wing Commander Geoffrey Leonard CHESHIRE, D.S.O., D.F.C. (72021), Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, 617 Squadron. This officer began his operational career in June, 1940. Against strongly-defended targets he soon displayed the courage and determination of an exceptional leader. He was always ready to accept extra risks to ensure success. Defying the. formidable Ruhr defences, he frequently released his bomlbs from "below 2,000 feet. Over Cologne in November, 1940, a shell burst inside his aircraft, blowing out one side and starting a fire; undeterred, he went on to bomb his target. About this time, he carried out a number of convoy, patrols in addition to his bombing missions. At the end of his first tour of operational duty in January, 1941, he immediately volunteered for a second. Again, he pressed home his attacks with the utmost gallantry. Berlin, Bremen, Cologne, Duisberg, Essen and Kiel were among the heavily-defended targets which he attacked. When he was posted for' instructional duties in January, 1942, he undertook four more operational missions. He started a third operational tour in August,. 1942, when he was given command of a squadron. He led the squadron with outstanding skill* on a number of missions . before Ibeing 'appointed in March, 1943, as a station commander. In October, 1943, he'undertook a fourth operational tour, relinquishing the rank of group captain at his own request so that he could again take part in operations. He immediately set to work as the pioneer of a new method of marking enemy targets involving very low flying. In."June, -1944, when marking a target in the harbour at ,Le Havre in broad daylight and without cloud cover, he dived well below the range of the light batteries before releasing his markerbombs, and he came very near to ibeing destroyed by the strong barrage which concentrated on him. During his fourth tour which ended in July, 1944, Wing Commander Cheshire led his squadron personally on every occasion, always undertaking the most dangerous and difficult task of marking the target alone from a low level in the face of strong defences. Whig Commander Cheshire's cold and calculated acceptance of risks is exemplified by his conduct in an. attack on Munich in April, 1944. This was an experimental attack to test out the new method of target marking at low level against a heavily-defended target situated deep in Reich territory. Munich was selected, at Wing Commander Cheshire's request, because of the formidable nature of its light anti-aircraft and searchlight defences. He was obliged to follow, in bad weather, a direct route which took him over the defences of Augsburg and thereafter he was continuously under fire. As' he reached the target, flares were .being released by our high-flying aircraft. He was illuminated from above and below. All guns within range opened fire on him. Diving to 700 feet, he dropped his markers with great precision and began to climb away. So blinding were the searchlights that he almost lost control. He then flew over the city at 1,000 feet to assess the accuracy of his work and direct other aircraft. His own was badly hit by shell fragments but he continued to fly over the target area until he was satisfied that, he had done all in his power to ensure success. Eventually, when he set course for base, the task of disengaging himself from the defences proved even more hazardous than the approach., For a full twelve minutes after leaving the target'area he was under withering fire but he came safely through. Wing Commander Cheshire has now completed a total *of roo missions. In four years of fighting against 'the bitterest opposition he has maintained a record of. outstanding 4176 SUPPLEMENT TO THE LONDON GAZETTE, 8 SEPTEMBER, 1944^ personal achievement, placing himself invariably in the forefront of the 'battle. What he did in the Munich operation was typical of the careful planning, brilliant, execution and contempt for danger which has established for Wing Commander Cheshire a reputation second to none in Bomber Command. London Gazette No. 36693, Dated 1944-09-08

Related Posts in RAF Commands Forum - Fuzzy Search

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Award of DFMJoint announcement 6th December, 1940 Appointed a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order. Pilot Officer Geoffrey Leonard CHESHIRE (72021), No. 102 Squadron. Awarded the Distinguished Flying Medal. 628831 Sergeant Henry DAVIDSON, No. 102 Squadron. Pilot Officer Cheshire and Sergeant Davidson were the captain and wireless operator respectively, in an aircraft detailed to attack a target near Cologne one night in November, 1940. During a lull, following half-an-hour's intense and accurate antiaircraft fire, a photographic flare was about to be dropped from a height of 8,000 feet, when it was detonated by a piece of shrapnel causing a blinding explosion in the fuselage and front turret. The cockpit was filled with black fumes and fire broke out. Sergeant Davidson was dazed by the explosion, his face and hands were badly burned and his clothing was set on fire. Snowing great coolness Pilot Officer Cheshire regained control of his aircraft, which had lost considerable height and was being subjected to intense anti-aircraft fire and although the explosion had blown out a considerable part of the fuselage and caused other damage, he finally succeeded in regaining height. When the fire was extinguished, Sergeant Davidson's injuries were so severe that he was unable to see. In spite of this he persuaded the rear gunner to guide his burned fingers to the wireless controls as he called out the settings, a process which was continued until it was realised the wireless was useless. Despite his intense suffering, Sergeant Davidson displayed great courage and fortitude by consistently refusing to be landed at a station nearer than base. Although the aircraft was only partially answering to controls, Pilot Officer Cheshire succeeded in regaining his aerodrome. He displayed great courage, determination and leadership throughout. A ....Read More.Amrit on 4th July 2009 04:20:04
RAF Awards Database 1221 DSOs, 20888 DFCs, 33628 MiDsThis is the second installment of the Awards Database that had been in the works for some time. [URL]http://www.rafcommands.com/database/awards/[/URL] or more specifically [url]http://www.rafcommands.com/database/awards/index.php?qaward=DFC[/url] You will find all the entries for 20,887 DFC Awards - Citations, and Links to the original gazette issues. easily searchable via the query.. This DB was something I always wanted to do - for years since LG had their issues available. Thanks to the some of the previous work and coding effort, and scraping of London Gazette website, and additional verification from various ref books, the DFC DB is now complete. Big shout out to Malcolm Barrass for contributing to the grunt work along with me in scraping the Citations and Notifications off the 500 odd LG issues. At last count, 6180 DFC awards have citations and 14707 DFC awards are "Notification Only". Eitherway all are linked to the original Gazettes. Note that since this depends on how the LG was OCR-ed in the first place the spelling errors and character errors from the GAzette have been replicated in the database. At best use the DB to locate the original gazette links. Since the Award DB is linked to all our other DBs - CWGC, aircraft, LGindex - you will find entries now a bit more enriched. eg.. Leonard Cheshire - [URL]http://www.rafcommands.com/database/awards/details.php?qnum=72021&qname=CHESHIRE[/URL] or Guy GIBSON [URL]http://www.rafcommands.com/database/awards/details.php?qnum=39438&qname=GIBSON[/URL] ....Read More.Jagan on 11th February 2020 06:59:18

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