Database :: Aircraft Serials :: Aircraft Losses

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Hurricane II HM127 [Royal Air Force Aircraft Serial and Image Database] RAFCommands.com

 Hurricane II HM127



POW Air Combat, Shot down by Ki43. His squadron leader later visited his "widow" saying there was no hope that Chook had survived: he and others had seen his Hurricane spiral into the ground and burst into flames, and the pilot had been unable to take to his parachute. Yet, miraculously and against all the odds, Chook had survived. His fellow airmen were right: his parachute had not opened but as his aircraft hurtled downwards it had, in fact, exploded only yards before it hit the ground at around 300 mph. He appears to have been thrown upwards before landing in the shallow Irawaji River: this cushioned his fall and the water put out the flames of his burning flying suit. Such a miraculous escape makes him a rare member of the unofficial "Gannet Club", named after the bird that plunges vertically for fish. It is understood than fewer than 20 servicemen survived full-blooded plane crashes during the Second World War because something, including snow and trees, cushioned their fall. http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11578684 ,607 Sqn lost 1942-12-24 More information in: RAFCommands.com Databases

Block 7, Hawker Aircraft Ltd., RR Merlin XX. 17 Mar 1942 to 23 Nov 1942 More information in: Dr. Colin James Pratt-Hooson's Hurricane Site

Aircraft Accident / Loss Entry

Date of Crash  24 Dec 42 Aircraft Name  Hurricane Serial Number  HM127
Unit  607 Sqdn Operating Airfield  Jessore Country  Burma
Aircrew details Fg Offr Charles Douglas Fergusson
Details POW Air Combat, Shot down by Ki43. His squadron leader later visited his "widow" saying there was no hope that Chook had survived: he and others had seen his Hurricane spiral into the ground and burst into flames, and the pilot had been unable to take to his parachute. Yet, miraculously and against all the odds, Chook had survived. His fellow airmen were right: his parachute had not opened but as his aircraft hurtled downwards it had, in fact, exploded only yards before it hit the ground at around 300 mph. He appears to have been thrown upwards before landing in the shallow Irawaji River: this cushioned his fall and the water put out the flames of his burning flying suit. Such a miraculous escape makes him a rare member of the unofficial "Gannet Club", named after the bird that plunges vertically for fish. It is understood than fewer than 20 servicemen survived full-blooded plane crashes during the Second World War because something, including snow and trees, cushioned their fall. http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11578684. Four ac of 607 and 615 squadron attacked target
Source HurricanesOverArakan


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