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Hurricane I V6962 [Royal Air Force Aircraft Serial and Image Database] RAFCommands.com

 Hurricane I V6962



Block 3/G, Gloster Aircraft Co, RR Merlin III or XX, July 1940 - Aug 1941 More information in: Dr. Colin James Pratt-Hooson's Hurricane Site

National Archives AIR81

Citation AIR81 Casualty File Description Link
AIR81/6770Sergeant J M MacDonnell (RCAF): killed; aircraft accident, Hurricane V6962, 55 Operational Training Unit, 6 June 1941.C16756067

Casualities in the CWGC Register for Hurricane I V6962

RankName, Number, Trade & DetailsDateUnitCountryCemetary/Memorial & Loc Ref
SergeantJoseph Miles MACDONELL (R/71617) Pilot Hurricane I V6962 AIR81/6770 1941-06-0655 OTUUnited KingdomHylton (Castletown) Cemetery

Related Posts in RAF Commands Forum

ThreadPost TextAuthor
Biplane claimsG'day Alux Here's a short piece you might be interested in reading. It was part of a larger newspaper article I did on Canadians during the Battle of Britain. Cheers...Chris Cowboy Antics When you're on the tail of an enemy aircraft in the heat of battle and you find the guns are out of ammunition, what do you do? That is the dilemma that faced Flight Lieutenant Howard Peter 'Cowboy' Blatchford of Edmonton Alberta as he lined up his sights on an Italian Fiat CR.42 ‘Falco’ bi-plane of the Corpo Aero Italiano. Benito Mussolini had convinced Adolf Hitler that the Regia Aeronautica (Italian Air Force) could help with the final victory for fascism in Europe, despite the express misgivings of the Luftwaffe's Commander-in-Chief Hermann Goering. On the 11th of November, 1940, as a retaliatory measure for the Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm’s attack on the Italian fleet at Taranto, the Regia Aeronautica set out to bomb the English port of Harwich. A small number of Luftwaffe Bf-109s accompanied the formation. They were intercepted by Hurricanes of No.s 17, 46 'Uganda' and 257 'China-British' (F) Squadrons. While 'Cowboy' Blatchford of No.257 'Burma' (F) Squadron was flying Hurricane s/n V6962, he discovered much to his shock that he was out of ammo. He instinctively rammed the CR.42 with his propeller. It subsequently chewed up the enemy's top wing, sending the fabric bi-plane tumbling earthwards. For his daring escapades, 'Cowboy' was presented the Distinguished Flying Cross on the 6th of December 1940. Sadly, as with so many fine young men, Wing Commander H.P. 'Cowboy' Blatchford DFC MiD and only 31 years old, was killed in action. On the 3rd of May 1943, now the Coltishall Wing Leader, 'Cowboy' was taking part in a Ramrod 16 escorting Royal New Zealand Air Force Lockheed Ventura Mk. II bombers to Ijmuiden, Netherlands. He was engaged by Luftwaffe Fw-190's of JG 1 and was forced to ditch his aircraft in the North Sea. His body was never recovered. 'Cowboy's' record was six destroyed, three probables and two damaged. ....Read More.Dakota on 1st November 2009 04:10:06
P/O PJT Stephenson, 607 Sqn 15th Sept 1940?Hi Simon, In the action you mention, 607 Squadron, attacked a formation of Do17s in the area of Appledore. They carried out a head-on attack; it was during this first run that Paddy Stephenson almost hit one Do17, passing just over it and bumped another, the second one crashed near Goudhurst, Stephenson was slightly injured breaking an ankle when he landed by parachute. Stephenson was flying Hurricane V6688 and no a/c letter has come to light, so far. I have a copy of Stephenson's photo album but his photo's of the 'Battle' period dwell on crews rather than aircraft. His only Hurricane photo's feature V6962 AF-H which he flew during the winter of 1940/41. In fact most of his album features only crews and pilots. To update his 'biography': he was a sergeant only during training. He joined 607 Squadron, his first squadron, June 18, 1940 and not July mentioned in 'Men of'. He emigrated to Canada after the war but came back to England and died in a Northumberland (Hexham I think) nursing home 2003. Best Wishes. Robert. ....Read More.northeagle on 15th July 2010 08:19:53
P/O PJT Stephenson, 607 Sqn 15th Sept 1940?Could this be V6962? V6982 does not appear to have served with 607 Sq, according to Air Britain. ....Read More.Graham Boak on 15th July 2010 09:14:38
P/O PJT Stephenson, 607 Sqn 15th Sept 1940?[QUOTE=Graham Boak;51119]Could this be V6962? V6982 does not appear to have served with 607 Sq, according to Air Britain.[/QUOTE] I think it is...it's on a very dark bit could well be a 6 ....Read More.northeagle on 15th July 2010 10:18:30
Italian Air Force Raid on Debden 1940G'day Here is a short story I wrote as part of a major piece on the Battle of Britain I did as an R.C.A.F. Historian. Cheers...Chris [U][I][/I][B]Cowboy Antics[/B][/U] When you're on the tail of an enemy aircraft in the heat of battle and you find the guns are out of ammunition, what do you do? That is the dilemma that faced Flight Lieutenant Howard Peter [I]'Cowboy'[/I] Blatchford of Edmonton Alberta as he lined up in his sights on an Italian Fiat CR.42 bi-plane of the Corpo Aero Italiano. The blundering and pompous Benito Mussolini, had convinced his friend the Reichsfuhrer (Herr Adolf Hitler) that the Regia Aeronautica (Italian Air Force) could help with the final victory for fascism in Europe, this despite the express misgivings of the Luftwaffe's Commander-in-Chief Hermann Goering. On the 11th of November, 1940, as a retaliatory measure for the Royal Navy's Fleet Air Arm's attack on the Italian fleet at Taranto, the Regia Aeronautica set out to bomb the English port of Harwich. A small number of Luftwaffe Bf-109s accompanied the formation. They were intercepted by Hurricanes of No.s 17, 46[I] 'Uganda' [/I]and 257[I] 'China-British' [/I](F) Squadrons. While[I] 'Cowboy' [/I]Blatchford of No.257[I] 'Burma' [/I](F) Squadron was flying Hurricane s/n V6962 and upon discovering much to his shock that he was out of ammo, rammed the CR.42 with his propeller. It subsequently chewed up the enemy's top wing, sending the fabric bi-plane tumbling earthwards. For his daring escapades, [I]'Cowboy'[/I] was presented the Distinguished Flying Cross on the 6th of December 1940. Sadly, as with so many fine young men, Wing Commander H.P.[I] 'Cowboy'[/I] Blatchford DFC MiD and only 31 years old, was killed in action. On the 3rd of May 1943, now the Coltishall Wing Leader, [I]'Cowboy'[/I] was taking part in a Ramrod 16, escorting Royal New Zealand Air Force. Lockheed Ventura Mk. II bombers to Ijmuiden, Netherlands. He was engaged by Luftwaffe Fw-190's of JG 1 and forced to ditch his aircraft in the North Sea. His body was never recovered.[I] 'Cowboy's' [/I]record was six destroyed, three probables and two damaged. ....Read More.Dakota on 24th April 2014 04:56:12


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