Database :: Commonwealth Air Forces War Dead :: Individual Casualty Page


This page commemorates

Sergeant Albert Stanley PRINCE (580195) of the Royal Air Force

Pilot
Lost in aircraft Blenheim IV N6240  NA/PRO

Death of Death 1939-09-04 .

Served in 107 Sqdn

Burial/Commemoration Details : 23. B. 13. at Becklingen War Cemetery, Germany

More Details: SON OF HAROLD BRAITHWAITE PRINCE AND ELIZA PRINCE; HUSBAND OF WINIFRED MARY PRINCE, OF CHESTER.

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View Commonwealth War Graves Commission : A S PRINCE

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National Archives AIR81

Citation AIR81 Casualty File Description Link
AIR81/1Pilot Officer W J Murphy, Flight Lieutenant W F Barton, Flying Officer H L Emden, Flying Officer H B Lightoller, Flying Officer J F Ross, Aircraftman 1st Class R Evans, Sergeant L R Ward, Sergeant S G M Otty, Corporal J L Ricketts, Aircraftman 2nd Class E Pateman, Sergeant O L D Howells, Aircraftman 1st Class E W Lyon and Sergeant A S Prince: report of deaths. Sergeant G F Booth and Aircraftman 2nd Class L J Slattery: prisoners of war. Pilot Sergeant R C Grossey: missing presumed dead; raid by Blenheims N6199, N6184, N6186, N6189 and N6240 on Wilhelmshaven, 4 September 1939. Note: With identity discsC14141980

Aircraft Accident / Loss Entry

Date of Crash 1939-01-01 04 Sep 39 Aircraft Name Blenheim IV Serial Number N6240
Unit 107 Sqdn Operating Airfield Country Germany
Aircrew details
Details
Source Henk Welting's Database

Other Aircrew lost in Blenheim IV N6240

Rank Name, Number, Trade & Details DateUnit Country Cemetary/Memorial & Loc Ref
SergeantAlbert Stanley PRINCE (580195) Pilot Blenheim IV N6240  NA/PRO 1939-09-04107 Sqdn AIR27 GermanyBecklingen War Cemetery


Related Posts in RAF Commands Forum

ThreadPost TextAuthor
Who was "RAF Prisoner No.1"?I'd think this would be one of the crew of Whitley K8950 DY - M of 102 Squadron flying a 'Nickel' op. The crew was: Squadron Leader Stephen Murray - Pilot Pilot Officer Alan Thompson - Second Pilot Sergeant Charles Hill - Observer Aircraftman 1st Class Sam Burry - Wireless Operator Aircraftman 1st Class Peter Pacey - Rear Gunner They had the distinction of being the first complete crew captured, but not the first POW's, a 107 Squadron Blenheim being lost during the night of the 3rd/4th provided the first two, the pilot Sergeant Albert Stanley Prince being killed. ....Read More.Unverified 9395 on 10th December 2010 06:18:09
Who was "RAF Prisoner No.1"?I've read for some years ago the story about Sgt Albert Stanley Prince, written by Dave Birell. Brought second time in a chronicle by The Nanton Lancaster Society (now Bomber Command Museum of Canada). Sgt. Booth and AC1 Slatter, they could be the first prisoners of RAF. http://www.bombercommandmuseum.ca/prince.html Regards Finn Buch ....Read More.Argus on 19th December 2010 05:43:54
RAF Casualty Packs 1939-45 Public AccessLee Richards on WW2 Talk took a look at one of the Files at the weekend. He posted the following on WW2 Talk AIR 81/1. This will give you an idea of what sort of info each one will contain though some will be more detailed than others The description for the AIR 81/1 casualty pack is: "Pilot Officer W J Murphy, Flight Lieutenant W F Barton, Flying Officer H L Emden, Flying Officer H B Lightoller, Flying Officer J F Ross, Aircraftman 1st Class R Evans, Sergeant L R Ward, Sergeant S G M Otty, Corporal J L Ricketts, Aircraftman 2nd Class E Pateman, Sergeant O L D Howells, Aircraftman 1st Class E W Lyon and Sergeant A S Prince: report of deaths. Sergeant G F Booth and Aircraftman 2nd Class L J Slattery: prisoners of war. Pilot Sergeant R C Grossey: missing presumed dead; raid by Blenheims N6199, N6184, N6186, N6189 and N6240 on Wilhelmshaven, 4 September 1939 It makes rather sombre reading. The file is around 400 to 500 pages with varied contents including the identity disks of several of the aircrew. There are notifications from Germany sent via the Red Cross and even includes two post-mortem reports conducted by a German medical examiner. Correspondence with next of kin was the most harrowing parts to read. The file also contained exhumation reports of the deceased and details of their re-internment. There were notes that the deceased aircrew had been given a burial with military honours and photographs of it had been supplied through the Red Cross. A sticker on the cover of file said it contained distressing photographs but there were not any in this particular file. However, it is not difficult to imagine the nature of photographs likely to be present in other of the casualty packs that might accompany the exhumation reports." ....Read More.paulmcmillan on 13th January 2014 04:07:53

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