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Thread: Buried in Limoges (Louyat) Communal Cemetery

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    Default Buried in Limoges (Louyat) Communal Cemetery

    Looking to see if anyone has more details on Flight Sergeant (Pilot) Harry Reginald HOLLINGS - 1433950
    Died 6 March 1945 and buried buried in Limoges (Louyat) Communal Cemetery, France.
    He is recorded in flight as KOAS.

    A previous thread looking for information on someone else on that date quoted him as "HOLLINGS HR 1433950 Buried in France. RO RAF lists unit as MELTON MOWBRAY", although I am not sure if that will provide any clues to any you.

    Many thanks
    Martyn

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    Incase this thread disappears, the only previous mention of Melton Mowbrey on the forum as such was it having an Overseas Aircraft Preparation Unit stationed there. I woudl at a guess say he was ferrying an aircraft or one member of a crew that died ferrying an aircraft. I've not looked at where the cemetery is, is it near Belgium or out in the west of France.

    Check with these guys, they seem to have a photo of him on their memorial iste:
    http://www.inmemories.com/Cemeteries/limoges.htm
    Dennis Burke
    - Dublin

    Foreign Aircrew and Aircraft Ireland 1939-1945
    www.ww2irishaviation.com

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    Martyn/Dennis,
    What was this guy doing in Limoges anyway? Limoges is only c. 450 nm from Melton Mowbray (MM). Malcolm's rafweb has a vast amount of info on MM (mostly Ferry). If he was the only bloke killed on that day in the Limoges area then can we probably rule out a multi-crewed a/c. If a single-crewed a/c (with limited range) then was Limoges a re-fuelling stop? If you extend a line from MM to Limoges then you end up around the eastern end of the French/Spanish border. Going to Gib? Did we need any more single-crewed a/c in N Africa at that stage of the war? The weather over the route MM>Limoges would, most likely, have been quite benign (very big anticyclone covering the area). Might, however, have been mist/fog, or the dreaded low stratus, depending on the time of the event. KOAS does seem to indicate an aviation event (but not involving the enemy)?
    All the above is supposition and/or 'kite-flying' - but it fits the currently known facts? Or does it?
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Last edited by Resmoroh; 26th February 2011 at 13:59. Reason: Hind-casting (Met Men good at that!)
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Hello,

    This case really looks like a ferrying pilot crashing in the Limoges area. Attrition meant that new types had to be ferried all over, even if it was March 1945 and victory was in sight.

    Typically the kind of question to ask to AHB. I have a few pilots buried in northern France, no unit given, no mention in the usual published source. One was ferrying a Spitfire with a Group Support Unit, the other was a pilot with a Repair Unit.

    Joss

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    Thanks for your input so far guys.
    If it was ferrying a single seater, there is a possibility of a Spitfire JK620 (R-RH Cv LFIX M66 612S 12-3-43 engine failed wheels up landing Tunbridge Wells CB 26-3-43 AST 313S FAAC 29-5-44 3501SU 9-7-44 MedAAF 5-3-45 crashed France en route to Middle East CE 6-3-45)

    Martyn

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    A quick look in Sturtivant's RAF FLYING TRAINING AND SUPPORT UNITS SINCE 1912 with its useful index of place names shows No. 12 Ferry Unit at Melton Mowbray in March 1945. The unit handled Stirlings, Mosquitos, Harvards, Mustangs, Spitfires, Hellcats and Corsairs.
    Another possibility, the Melton Mowbray Station Flight which had at least one example of the Hudson and Oxford.

    Ian Macdonald

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    Gentleman, many thanks for your replies, they have enabled me to take this forward further.

    Martyn

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