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Thread: No 18 wireless observer unit

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    Default No 18 wireless observer unit

    i AM TRYING TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THIS RAF UNIT , PLEASE CAN ANYONE POINT ME IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION AS A REF/AIR NO AT THE NAT/ARCHIVES ?
    AS ALWAYS MY THANKS WITH THIS
    PHILL JONES

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    Phill,
    I always thought that Wireless Observer Units were deployed in areas where there was no radar cover. They did, basically, the same sort of thing as the (civilian?) ROC did in UK. They were (I was told) deployed to the more mountainous regions of the Middle, and Far, East where - even if there had been radar cover - the mountains would have caused a number of radar "blind spots" which could have been exploited by the enemy.
    The other possibility is that being a mere 'observer' Unit they were not very secret. Thus it might be possible to "hide" a tactical, mobile, "Y Service" intelligence listening Unit under the innocuous title of a 'Wireless Observer Unit'.
    I await the experts' divinations with some interest!
    HTH
    Peter Davies.
    Last edited by Resmoroh; 1st April 2011 at 15:37.
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Default No 18 wireless observer unit

    Quote Originally Posted by Resmoroh View Post
    Phill,
    I always thought that Wireless Observer Units were deployed in areas where there was no radar cover. They did, basically, the same sort of thing as the (civilian?) ROC did in UK. They were (I was told) deployed to the more mountainous regions of the Middle, and Far, East where - even if there had been radar cover - the mountains would have caused a number of radar "blind spots" which could have been exploited by the enemy.
    The other possibility is that being a mere 'observer' Unit they were not very secret. Thus it might be possible to "hide" a tactical, mobile, "Y Service" intelligence listening Unit under the innocuous title of a 'Wireless Observer Unit'.
    I await the experts' divinations with some interest!
    HTH
    Peter Davies.
    Peter , thank you for interest , the unit was operating at ARDNAMURCHAN POINT in argyll in Scotland , (The most westerly point on the british mainland ), i was involved in research into the area during wartime
    when i lived locally some yrs ago , i came across some handwritten notes from those days and i am trying to tie up the loose ends , so i was basically looking to see if the unit kept a kind of ORB or simlair that may be held at the NA
    the whole area was involved with various military activity during ww2 AND in fact many of the small islands in and around the inner hebrides was using these type of RAF UNITS some also with RADAR etc , AS YOU SAY PLOTTING AIRCRAFT MOVEMENTS . looks like i shall have to dig deeper as information is scarce at the moment .
    phill

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    Phill,
    Interesting stuff!
    There were at least 3 Chain Home radar sites on the west coast of Tiree in WW2. I think 2 were High, and 1 was Low. Between those 3 sites and Ardnamurchan Point is the high ground on Coll. This would probably mean that Ardnamurchan Point would be in a radar 'blind spot'.
    There's very little else on the DOBDA overlay on Google Earth.
    Now I don't know enough about Chain Home radars and what their coverage was. If the radars on Tiree were mainly designed to detect a/c coming from the west then, again, I don't know enough about 'back beams' and other dark secrets, etc, of the Wiggly Amps brigade!
    But I know a man who does! Ian (Brown) The Radar is our man. We need him to pronounce. If he's not reading this on the circuit then try him with a PM.
    Best I can do
    Peter Davies
    Last edited by Resmoroh; 4th April 2011 at 14:37.
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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