Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Sgt Harry Unsworth 1113118 Killed 18/5/42

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    34
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default Sgt Harry Unsworth 1113118 Killed 18/5/42

    Hi

    Does anyone have any info on the loss of this Oldham Airman.

    He is remembered on The Runnymede Memorial, He isn't listed in Chorley's RAF Bomber command losses books ,so may possibly be a Coastal Command casualty. Most likely a OTU unit loss.

    Any GEN would be greatfully recieved.

    All the best

    Al

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Bewdley, UK
    Posts
    2,703
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default

    Hi,

    You are correct in your guess of a Coastal or OTU loss, it was both.

    18/05/42
    No.6 OTU
    Hudson I
    N7343

    Sgt L Hammond
    Sgt H Boardman
    Sgt H Unsworth
    Sgt C Flint

    Met Flight

    Failed to return from North Sea. All are commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial to the missing.

    You may also be interested in post 2 from this previous thread

    http://www.rafcommands.com/forum/showthread.php?5775-Unaccounted-airmen-18-5-1942

    Regards
    Ross
    The Intellectual Property contained in this message has been assigned specifically to this web site.
    Copyright Ross McNeill 2015/2018 - All rights reserved.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    34
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default Thank you

    Ross

    Thank you very much for the GEN.

    I now have far more information than I thought I would ever get and the fact his son lives only a few miles away across Morecambe bay is very interesting.

    Again much appreciated.

    Keep up the great site and your help to such as myself, you are a true gent.

    Cheers

    Alastair.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Reading, Berkshire, UK
    Posts
    3,648
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts

    Default

    Can you confirm that the crew of Hudson N7343 was:
    1 x Pilot
    1 x Nav
    2 x WOP/AG?
    Just checking there's not a Met Man lurking!
    TIA
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Bewdley, UK
    Posts
    2,703
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default

    No met man onboard.

    This was a locally ordered daily flight from Thornaby to assess local flying conditions.

    The steel works at Redcar/Middlesborough/Hartlepool and associated heavy industry pushed out a local smog into the Tees Valley that restricted visibility in the corridor through the barrage balloon field to the aerodromes.

    The flight was used as a normal training flight by OTU crews with the idea that if smog was clearing then no problem but if smog persisted then the crews needed to learn to fly in it before they went operational.

    Regards
    Ross
    The Intellectual Property contained in this message has been assigned specifically to this web site.
    Copyright Ross McNeill 2015/2018 - All rights reserved.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Wiltshire
    Posts
    2,514
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts

    Default

    Peter:

    If this was a Met Flight aircraft then there would not have been a Meteorological Air Observer (MAO) amongst the crew at the time; the met observations were done by the navigator. The first MAO course started during March 1943 and the first MAOs did not join the squadrons until the late spring/early summer.

    Ross:

    I'm a little confused, was this a 6 OTU aircraft or a Met Flight aircraft (1401 Met Flight was based at Birchan Newton at the time)?

    Brian

    Edit

    You beat me to it Ross, you posted whilst I was writing. It was the use of capitals (M)et (F)light that confused us.
    Last edited by Lyffe; 3rd June 2011 at 10:02.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Bewdley, UK
    Posts
    2,703
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default

    Like to keep the blood pressure of the Met boys up! Not every weather related flight was grasped and pulled into the union domain.

    Al
    Thought that the page in my database was well worn.

    Another relative of a crewman for you.
    http://www.ww2talk.com/forum/war-air/35220-sgt-cyril-flint-raf-rcaf.html

    Regards
    Ross
    The Intellectual Property contained in this message has been assigned specifically to this web site.
    Copyright Ross McNeill 2015/2018 - All rights reserved.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    34
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default Even more info thanks again!

    Hi

    Just a quick thanks to all who have commented on this request.

    Some data for you all in return

    It is very sad news though, his his son Anthony passed away exactly one year ago today.

    I have been told Anthony Unsworth was +/- 9 when his dad was lost over the North Sea and had been doing some digging into his loss and had found out most of what we have here. He had done a lot of research on the family as well and was very happy with what he found on all of his relatives.
    I can add, with a slightly lighter heart, there is tree and plaque at the National Arboretum for Harry Unswoth & his wife this was placed by Anthony and his wife only a couple of years ago. I will find this at my next visit there to pay my respects to this Airman and his Lady.

    Also for the Met men some GEN for them too.

    I have in my collection a WW2 Medal group & MID Certificate to F/O Kenneth George MID ex 1402 Met Flight. Sadly killed a flying accident as a Flying Instructor on 2 Nov 1943. His MID is for the First PRATA ascent on 1st Mar 1941 I am lead to beleive. His medal group & MID Cert is on the wall behind my head as I write this reply top you all.
    I have also had the honour in the distant past of being "the caretaker" of The Medal group to F/O W "Bill" Luddington of 1401 Flight. This airman was killed in the Tip & Run raid on Torquay RAF Hospital in 1942 while recovering from his injuries received in a Crash landing on 14th May 1942.
    Both these airmen are mentioned in " "Even the Birds Were Walking" by J A Kington & P G Ratcliff. There is a good picture of F/O Luddington's Blenheim after the accident in the book on page 128. Also I suggest you read the story in the book by his Pilot F/Sgt Harry Garfield on the accident as it is a fitting tribute to the devotion to the task of this airman and those like him.

    Again thanks to all for the GEN given.

    Cheers

    Al

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Wiltshire
    Posts
    2,514
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts

    Default

    Al,

    Thank you for the heads-up about the medal groups. Unfortunately I think it's very unlikely that the MiD was awarded for the first PRATA sortie. Although the main body of the text of "Even the birds were walking" does not decribe the development of PRessure And Temperature Ascents (PRATA) very well, at the top of page 203 on Appendix 2 is a reference the first PRATA being flown at Aldergrove on 10 October 1941. (I'm relieved that ties in with my own research.)

    At the beginning of the war the only UK upper air data available to the Met Office were the twice daily ascents flown to 24000 ft by the Mildenhall (later 1401) Met Flight and Aldergove (later 1402) Met Flight using Gladiators. These were later supplemented by Hurricanes but even so the top of the climb was always 24000 ft.

    Despite a desperate need for data at higher levels (40000 ft) it was not until April 1941 that authority was given to increase the establishment of the Met Flights by two Spitfire IIs. However, because of a continuing shortage of the type the aircraft were slow in being delivered and, as I've said, the first ascent wasn't made until October 1941. In fact the model was unable to deliver the goods and very few PRATAs were flown until the following spring (AP1134 and personal research).

    If F/O George received his MiD whilst with, or soon after leaving 1402 Met Flight, it is distinctly possible it was rewarded in recognition of his ability whilst with the unit. All the Met Flights had remarkable records for flying in conditions that grounded others and many of the pilots had their service recognised in some way - quite often with an AFC.

    Brian

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •