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Thread: radios set in Stirlings in June-July 1941 ?

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    Default radios set in Stirlings in June-July 1941 ?

    Hello,

    What would have been the standard radio sets fitted in Stirling of the N60xx range, in June-July 1941 ?

    Was the Receiver R3003 standard equipement ?

    What was the transmitter ?

    What was the use of a "International Marine Radio Company, London" set, type T.G.5.C. ? An emergency radio set similar to the U.S. "Gibson girl", to be used at sea in case of a ditching ?

    thanks in advance

    Joss

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    Joss,
    The "Gibson Girl" (British and American versions) was actually an (naturally unauthorised!) copy of the Luftwaffe's standard hand-cranked emergency radio and fitted as standard equipment in all larger types of aircraft (bombers, flying boats, transports, etc, too large and cumbersome for single seater aircraft). The British and Americans intially thought this was a very crude device, but after expenditure of much gold and sweat both came to the conclusion that it was actually a very clever and effective piece of kit and put it into mass production; examples were still in use into the 1960s in the RNZAF, although I think major air forces had moved on a bit by then (or were at least working on something superior, including individual crew personal beacons, etc.) I should know what the R-3003 was, but cannot locate my notes as yet; however it was a very common piece of equipment on RAF aircraft - was it the Beam Approach receiver? I think the main wireless communications equipment on the Stirling in 1941 would have been the 1082/1083 sets, although the 1154/1155 was soon to make its appearance. The TR.9 (R/T, voice) set was also fitted to Stirlings (it soon became a standard fitting), mainly for taxiing and circuit work (its very short range at low altitudes was believed to guaranteed proof against the German's picking it up, although it was later realivzed that the Germans could build excellent aerials and had been listening to these conversations all along!) I think TR.9s were also occasionally used when working with fighters escorts on daylight raids over France in 1941, but this was a dangerous game and was soon abandoned. Any other contributions welcome.
    David D

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    Hello David

    Thanks for your contribution. I actually own a "Gibson girl" set myself, and the hand powered generator still works. I found it very hard to turn and especially to maintain the rotation, but I imagine that when one's lost at sea, survival instinct might add some strength...

    I found a reference to the TG-5C set which was the standard set in the RAF for the period 1939-1942, in a pdf found online about the IMRCo.

    I have a small plate from a Stirling receiver and it's definitvely R3003 and my books on the Stirling and the pilot's notes don't have this level of information. That's why I'm looking for the reference of the transmitter used in the same machine.

    You are quite right about the risky business in 1941. "My" subject was lost in one of these Circus operations.

    Thanks again for your help

    Joss

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    Fell over this while researching radio equipment for the Whirlwind Fighter Project. If still interested, the R3003 was the IFF transceiver.. standard equipment for RAF aircraft from early 1941 on..

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    Hello Beermat,

    Thanks for the information. Sure I'm always interested to know more.

    Joss

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    Joss,
    Being an IFF transceiver, the R.3003 was protected by a built-in self-destruct system which was (I think) actuated by a violent crash and could also be manually actuated by a crew member.

    Was TG-5C the manufacturer's designation for a British-built "Gibson Girl"? It does not sound like an RAF designation, but I stand to be corrected. Normally all standard RAF wireless equipment would have a T or an R (or a TR) designation with a two or (normally) three digit number in the WW2 era. The "Gibson Girl" was purely a transmitter so should have hade a simple "T" number.
    David D

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