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Thread: WWII logbooks

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    Default WWII logbooks

    Hi all,
    during the WWII future pilots, navigators, etc. of the Commonwealth underwent training in a number of areas in the world. Did those newly-trained pupils receive logbooks according to the country where they were enlisted or were trained?

    Regards
    Mojmir

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    Mojmir,
    From what I have seen, logbooks were issed in the country where the actual flying portion of the training of the individual actually commenced. This included pilot, observer or Navigator (and all permutations of this), W/Opr A/G, straight A/G, flight engineer, etc. All Commonwealth pilot trainees sent to Canada from Australia or NZ for their advanced training were already in possession of pilots logbooks issued in their home country as they had already completed their elementary flying training courses there, as each of these countries had convinced the scheme planners to permit them to carry out approximately 50% of this training themselves. These logbooks were normally printed within the country whose air force had issued tthem to the trainees. Conversely, observer and W/Opr A/G trainees who were to receive their advanced training in Canada only completed what was known as "initial" training in their home country, which did NOT include any flying, so they did not require a logbook unitl they reached Canada.
    Once the trainees had graduated in Canada, some were retained for instructional or ferrying duties, although the majority would have proceeded directly to the United Kingdom by sea, and were henceforth attached to the RAF for further flying until they were deemed to have completed their obligation according to the articles of the original Empire Air Traing Scheme (or British Commonwealth Training Plan according to the RCAF!). If and when each individual had used all the available pages in their New Zealand/Australian/Canadian logbooks during service with the RAF they could be issued with a British replacement (Form 414 for pilots from memory, designated as such also be all Commonwealth air forces) or one of their own "national" logbooks if available (they were basically all the same). Commonwealth aircrew trainees sent to the USA under the various schemes (Arnold, Towers, etc) were generally issued with USAAF or US Navy logbooks for their training depending on which service was conducting the training. Any futher comments from forumites welcomed.
    David D

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    Hi guys,

    I have my Great Uncles logbook He was in the RNZAF in the pacific.His logbook says Royal New Zealand Air Force Property of Her majesty.His one is wider but shorter logbook but in a photo of my other Great Uncle attached to the RAF he is holding a longer thiner logbook

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    David,
    Thank you for your quick and detailed reply!
    Mojmir

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    Luthermoore,
    Glad you have pointed out fact that the RAF pilots logbook was of slightly different dimensions to the RNZAF one, and notably thinner, although latter probably because of thinner paper. I have also seen the Indian pilot log books, these had a somewhat paler appearance (almost white from memory), whereas RAF are a medium/dark blue, RNZAF are buff with brown corners, but were all called "Form 414", and had very similar introductory notes inside front cover on ownership of the book ("Thi is an officiail document", etc), and the rules to be obsereved when filling in entries, and colours of ink to be used, etc. These book variations in their colour, exact shape and size and even feel of paper are sometimes surprising, and probably reflect the fact that different printers and binders had certain types of production equipment and covering cloths, or perhaps merely the preference of the contractors in what they thought constituted a handy sized form of book. Incidentally that would be the King, not the Queen who "owned" the RNZAF logbook, unless it was post 1952 of course.
    David D

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    Hi David,

    Your right about it being His Majesty,Thanks for clearing that up.From what i know is the RNZAF used acid papper in their logbooks,but im not 100%sure.You seem to know your log books I just checked out my one and your right it is a light brown with brown corners.Do you know of people putting covers on the logbooks?My one has a green fabric cover over it.I see black or blue ink in the book but sometimes boxes with writing or underlining is done in a red.
    http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/803/scan10103.jpg/

    Cheers
    Luther

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