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Thread: I.e. + i.r. = u.e. ?

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    Default I.e. + i.r. = u.e. ?

    There has been discussion on here before about the abbreviations I.E. and I.R. with regard to the number of aircraft in the establishment for a unit/squadron.

    In Mediterranean documents eg from MAAF and DAF I am encountering the use of "U.E." in the same context eg "U.E. of 16 aircraft". The abbreviation U.E. is used on its own and appears to encompass a combined figure for the initial establishment and the immediate reserve. I don't think I have ever encountered U.E. used in UK generated documents.

    Any ideas on what U.E. might mean? The only possibility I can come up with is "Unit Establishment".

    Steve

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    Steve,

    For what it is worth, 'Unit Establishment' is a term that is still in regular British military use today. It is mainly used to describe the number of posts, per rank, per specialisation in a given unit. I have also seen it used to describe larger items of equipment such as vehicles. I think you can be fairly certain it is used in the same context in your query.

    Rgds

    Jonny
    In fond memory of Corporal James Oakland AGC (RMP), killed in action in Afghanistan on 22 October 2009. Exemplo Ducemus.

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    STeve,
    I agree whole heartedly with Johnny, and could add that other items covered by Units establishments, apart from personnel (including any civilians or members of other services attached for various reasons), and aircraft (or any other types of major equipment which constitute the prime equipment of the unit including MT or marine craft, or even barrage balloons or Bofors guns) might be expressed in the unit's establishment. This might also include all weapons (small arms, etc, and ammunition holdings), and perhaps all minor equipment used in day to day operations including aircraft ground handling and ancilliary equipment for arming and refueling, towing, night flying; office equipment such as typewriters (or computers in today's armed forces) and other office essentials, etc, etc. Other segregated parts of the "Unit Establishment" (UE) apart from IE and IR, might also include SR (Stored Reserve) and WR (Workshop Reserve) although these were less common and would not normally be included in "normal" mobile squadrons or, for that matter, very stationary units with short and certain lines of supply. I imagine every organized armed service in the world from fairly ancient times to the present day has had equivalent systems to express its ideal base, unit and formation orrganisation, reserve structures, etc. Anybody or anything held on strength but not listed in the normal unit establishment was, by definition, listed as "supernmerary to establishment", and would have to have reasosn to justify their presence.
    David D

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    Thanks very much to Jonny and to David for your very helpful responses.
    Steve

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