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Thread: Wind Direction please?

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    Default Wind Direction please?

    Any one pleae any idea of the wind/visibility on 7th SEpt 1941?
    West Kent or East Sussex border.
    ORBs for Kenley, Biggin, West Malling, Gatwick or Redhill should have it listed.

    I cant find weather reports on line except for the Batle of Britain.
    Dave

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    Dave,
    Almost impossible to tell from the historic charts. There was a large anticyclone covering UK. The winds would have been Light & Variable with the possibility of a light northerly, or northeasterly, drift. In the later afternoon this drift may well have been considerably modified (in direction) by any sea-breezes.
    The visibilty would probably have been quite poor. There might have been fog/mist in the morning, but this would likely have burnt off by the afternoon. However that sort of wind direction would almost certainly have advected large amounts of London/Thames Estuary smoke and industrial haze.
    Best I can do, I'm afraid. You would need either the ORBs or the Met Office Daily Registers for those stations.
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Default Wind direction etc

    Hi Peter.
    Thanks, I agree with you.
    A great weather chart archive can be found online:

    http://www.wetterzentrale.de/topkarten/fsslpeur.html

    Sorry for the late reply as there was no Email notification.
    Dave

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    Dave,
    I've sent you a PM. My email is on my details.
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    David (and others),

    Be VERY careful how you use this archive, especially for the war years. It is based on German data and there is no indication of the time of validity of the charts (although I think they are valid for either 1200 or 1300 GMT) nor is there any indication as to the source of that data. This latter probably doesn't matter too much outside the war years, but be warned that however convincing the charts look the Germans had practically no information from (and including) the UK westwards. True, there were a few observations from U-boats and the Wekusta (German met squadrons) did a reasonable job; unfortunately the latter made one flight only per day from their various bases and, so far as the Atlantic is concerned, did not go beyond 15W.

    The Germans were very good at intercepting communications between Allied aircraft and their controllers (ATC and the like) - and that includes all aircraft flying over the UK (such as bombers returning from ops) and as far afield as Greenland, but they did not have a network of stations reporting at regular intervals.

    I'm currently doing some work on the D-day forecasts, and the German Atlantic analysis for 4 June has fronts and depression centres some 150-200 miles in error.

    Daily Registers for most airfields are held by the Met Office, and these contain hourly observations throughout the 24 hours; copies may be obtained by contacting the library at metlib@metoffice.gov.uk , but there is a small charge for the service; see http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/learning/library/charges-copyright. The data recorded are not the easiest to follow, but should anyone obtain some pages of observations this way I'd be happy to help interpret them. Alternatively you could also ask the library if there is a decode sheet to help interpret the observations.

    As yet another alternative you could request a Daily Weather Report (DWR) for the day in question. This will include two maps, one that extends from Russia, across the Atlantic to America, valid for 0100 GMT on the day in question, plus another chart for the UK for 0700 GMT. In addition there are observation for about 55 UK and Irish stations for 0100, 0700, 1300 and 1800 GMT - but make sure you request the observations for the day (ie the 20th) NOT the DWR issued on the 20th. Because of publication time constraints the observations included in the latter would be for 1300 and 1800 GMT on the 19th, and 0100 and 0700 GMT for the 20th.

    Hope that all makes sense.

    Brian

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    Default Weather chart archive

    Hi Brian.
    Thanks for warning me.
    I just thought it was a German website using charts sourced elsewhere.
    Thanks for your kind insight into this matter, I agree the airfield records were/will be very helpful as well.
    Dave

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