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Thread: Polish Air Force service numbers

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    Default Polish Air Force service numbers

    Hello Gents,

    Generally speaking, does exist any register listing the service number of Polish Air Force officers and NCOs which were under RAF command during WW2 (sn starting with 'P')?

    Thanks in advance

    Phil

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    Phil, indeed such a list does exist.
    If you need any specific information, just PM or e-mail me.

    Cheers,
    Gregory

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    Don't know about Officer Commissions. Non-Officer Enlistments included the block 2792000 - 2794300. The last number in this block that was issued was 2793426. There were, thus, 1426 of them. They were "WAAF Poles in UK. Prefixed by letter 'P' ", issued from June 1943 onwards. (Source Wg Cdr Jim Routledge's paper on "Miscellany of Honours" in The Orders and Medals Research Society, Issue No 9, 1992).
    So there were 1426 Polish WAAFs. I was under the impression that by far and away the largest number of Polish air force refugees were male - I knew, and worked with, many ex-Polish Met Men. I also flew (post-WW2) with many ex-Polish Master aircrew (a fearsome lot!). But who were these ladies, and what did they do?
    Can someone shine a light into one of the dark corners of the RAF Enlistment numbers???
    TIA
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Peter
    Only Polish officer serials were P prefixed. Polish WAAF did less than 10% of the total, they were mostly Siberia survivors, and did typical WAAF duties, supporting male force.

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    Franek,
    Tks yrs. Who, and what, were these "Siberia survivors" (male and/or female) all about? If they had been in some gulag in Siberia then how did they manage to get out of the USSR, and into Allied territory? This is something I (and others, I suspect!) know nothing about.
    Tell us more.
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Peter
    In 1939 Poland was attacked by Germans and Soviets. British and French pressed on Poland to minimalise the Soviet actions, somewhat successfully, but it is a long story. Nonetheless Soviet occupation was as much brutal as German one, with thousands of Poles being send deep into the Soviet Union. When in a twist of fate Hitler turned onto Soviets, British pressed on Poles to make an agreement with Soviets at all cost - another long story. In the result, a Polish army was formed out of survivors of the Soviet expulsions. Due to several reasons, in 1942 Gen. Anders moved with the army into Persia, taking thousands of women and children as well. After recovery, most suffered hunger and illness, some younger children were send to colonies, while older joined cadet schools, and some women went into various auxillary services.

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    Franek,
    I was aware of the various invasions of Poland. But I was not aware of the Siberia episode, and the subsequent extraction through Persia.
    Thank you for enlightening me!
    Rgds
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Oh, I thought it is so well known, I was surprised with the question. Glad to help. Write me some your service memories about Poles, please.

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    Franek,

    While the P prefix for NCO service numbers might not have been official, the RAF certainly did use it in ORBs.

    I have noted them in 9 ORBs and I'm fairly sure I've got 1180s on file with the P prefix.
    Alan Clark

    Peak District Air Accident Research

    http://www.peakdistrictaircrashes.co.uk/

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    Indeed, plenty of documents list NCO numbers with P prefix. This prooves difference between life and regulations.

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