Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: WW2 GPO Expert(s)

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Reading, Berkshire, UK
    Posts
    3,641
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts

    Default WW2 GPO Expert(s)

    Dear Each & All,
    We have a surprising number of experts, on this Forum, on a wide variety of subjects. I suspect that if we asked for left-handed Polish pilots, or Coastal Command Station Commanders who's Mothers were born in Peru, we would be innundated with responses!!
    I am looking, however, for a GPO Engineering Expert who either had experience (or knows somebody who does!!) of what I knew (post WW2) as the DTN (Defence Telegraph Network). This is one (and very important) aspect of UK military comms that not a lot is known about. I wish to know more. Who can help me?
    Rgds
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Bewdley, UK
    Posts
    2,703
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default

    Hi Peter,

    The secure links 1939 - 45 were the Defence Teleprinter Network and there is oodles of files on them at The National Archives, mostly in AIR2 series

    http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/catalogue/searchresults.asp?SearchInit=0&txtsearchterm=defen ce+teleprinter+network&txtfirstdate=&txtlastdate=& txtrestriction=&hdnsorttype=Reference&image1.x=29& image1.y=7

    Procedure for operating in AIR10/3744 and operating instructions in AIR20/1547

    Quite a bit of general info on Google under "Defence Teleprinter Network"

    Spent quite a bit of time trying to keep ASR33 Teleprinters on line - kept breaking the print fingers - two complete alphabets on each band so the symptom was a occasional missing letter but perfect print at other times..most fustrating.

    Regards
    Ross
    The Intellectual Property contained in this message has been assigned specifically to this web site.
    Copyright Ross McNeill 2015/2018 - All rights reserved.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Reading, Berkshire, UK
    Posts
    3,641
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts

    Default

    Ross, Hi,
    Tks for the steer!! We used to use Creed's (7's, I think) in the static Met Offices, but in the post-WW2 Mobile Units we used Siemens (T100's?). These latter would take a deal more punishment than a Creed!!!
    Rgds
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Kirkeby
    Posts
    450
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 3 Times in 2 Posts

    Default

    Do remember with fear my first lessons with a teleprinter. A handwritten "manual" beside the printer, telling how to do.

    Suddenly came the reply from one of our African customers, then a new look at the "manual". Do not lose the contact....next step.

    Few years later came the fax machine. What an invention!

    Finn Buch

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Hi Peter,

    Only just come across your posting.

    I haven't a great deal of information on the DTN, but was responsible for running the service for a few years prior to 2005 and then for closing down the contract.

    My involvement was largely on the "commercial" aspects, but had been known to fix a few printers in a previous existence as a field engineer in the Brighton area.

    Regards,

    Steve

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Reading, Berkshire, UK
    Posts
    3,641
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts

    Default

    Steve, Hi
    Tks yrs. I was, at that time, trying to get a ‘handle’ on the DTN and the deep-laid, nitrogen pressurised, cable network. My early Met Office career (1953 onwards) was in Bomber Command. On many airfields the airfield GPO Engineer’s “Office” was often quite near the Met Office and we worked well together. I learned about ‘Routing Cards’ (and some cards went to some VERY UNUSUAL places!!), mysterious places like Newmarket Signal Centre, Bawborough, etc, etc, and how to change a DTN relay in the Frame Room at 0300 without calling the Engineer out of his bed!! I also learned (later, at Mildenhall – joint RAF/USAF) that much of the USAF Top Secret Comms went through the Frame Room next door to the Met Office (the key was on the fan-light ledge above the door!!). The USAF would have had the conniptions if they’d known!!! At the same time, on nights, I used to have to wrestle with this Plug ‘n Socket Met T/P switchboard (mahogany, with brass corner pieces, and in jack-plugs – would make a fortune in an antique sale these days!). Then ‘They’ invented wet-fax, then dry-fax, then satellite comms, then the internet – and all the fun went out of twisting copper wires together and making an antiquated system work that Marconi and Edison would have recognised!!!!!!!
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Last edited by Resmoroh; 14th December 2013 at 15:36.
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •