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Thread: Cat.III accident

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    Default Cat.III accident

    Hello Everyone,

    I'd like to know if an aircraft which sustained a Cat.III during WW2 could be repaired and if so, was it possible to do the repairs in situ or the aircraft had to be sent away?

    Thanks in advance

    Phil

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    Both RAF and FAA used U, M(u), M(c), R and W up to 1941.

    After that date RAF used A, B, C, D (rarely seen) and E

    Between June 1942 and Sept 43 FAA added
    S, X, Y and Z

    Between Sept 43 and Nov 44 FAA expanded
    X, Y and Z with 1 or 2 following the letter

    Post Nov 44 the FAA category were
    SS
    LQ
    LX
    LC
    LY
    HX
    HC
    HY
    ZZ

    so never a Cat.III in RAF or FAA use.

    Regards
    Ross
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    Phil,

    Useful Table here:

    http://www.k5083.mistral.co.uk/DAM_CAT.HTM

    Col.
    Last edited by COL BRUGGY; 30th October 2011 at 15:22.

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    Categories One to Five came along after the war.

    Cats 1 & 2 meant the aircraft was fixed at unit level.

    Cat 3 damage would be repaired by a specialist team, not the station/squadron personnel. That could mean the aircraft went to a repair depot or a team came to it with their gear and specialist techniques,

    Cat 4 implied that a contractor was needed, so the aircraft would go to the contractor's factory or a Contractors Working Party would come to the unit.

    Cat 5 was basically 'game over'. There were various sub categories, scrap, missing, spares recovery/reduced to components, destroyed, made a ground instructional aircraft (GIA), etc.

    From time to time the precise meanings have changed and the parameters which determine whether an aircraft is categorised to the particular degree depends on many factors, not least how long the type will remain in service or how many others are available.

    However, Phil, I hope this answeres your question, even if the aircraft was categorised as something else.
    I didn't ask before but are we talking about a British aircraft and unit or somebody else. Some Commonwealth countries did things slightly differently.

    Colin Cummings

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    Thanks all for your leads. However, it seems that things are not so simple. I am actually refering to No.146 Sqn ORB, and it seems (but can't be certain 100%) that the way to categorise accident like this, took place when the unit converted onto Thunderbolts. The diarist may have change since the Hurricane period, but Cat.II and Cat.III appear clearly during the Thun era (in Roman numerals, even if I found written once in arabic numerals). But the respective AMF1180s are clearly showing the system in use in the RAF at that time with the letters. Where is the system used by the diarist coming from then? Strange isn't it...A Cat.III seems to be not so dramatic for the aircraft, as a such categorised Thun appears in the Form 541 a couple of days later, but a Cat.II signed the end of the road for another one.

    Phil

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    I think you will find that Cat I, II and III were in use in the Middle East through most of the war. I think it has to be recognised that the repair arrangements in the Middle East were not as sophisticated as in Britain. My interest is in records from early 1944 onwards and those terms are used. I have done research at Kew on P-40 stuff for a friend in Australia and, from memory, those terms are used back to 1941. Sometimes the usual Cat AC, B etc are used but not as frequently as Cat I, II and III. In my view Cat III is a complete write off; the information coincides with the AB serials. My working hypothesis is that Cat II was repairable by a specialist maintenance unit and Cat I was repairable on the sqn.

    Steve

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    Off the top of my head, I know of one instance of Cat. III usage on 159 Squadron in the Far East. The 159 Squadron ORB rates two Liberator prangs as Cat. III (Roman numerals) following Oscar night fighter attacks over Rangoon on the night of 1/2 April 1944. I have five good photos of one of the wrecks (EV870 T), and it was a total write-off at Alipore -- a Calcutta airfield. I have a poor photocopy of the crumpled forward fuselage of the second one (EV843 "E"), and it definitely was an unrepairable mess at the more remote airfield at Chittagong. A third Liberator damaged by a fighter that night (BZ960 V) is rated Cat. I.

    Matt

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