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Thread: Polish AF amputees WW2

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    Default Polish AF amputees WW2

    Hi guys

    Seeking information on Roman Grzanka (pilot) and navigator Juliusz Baykowski of 307 Squadron, who both lost a leg but continued flying. Apparenty Grzanka lost his leg/foot pre-WW2 in a Spad 61 accident.

    Cheers
    Brian

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    Hi Brian,

    I can not help you with those teo but there was also one Czech - Sgt Ladislav Kadlec who lost one leg after wounded by nightfighter in summer 1941. He refused instructor post and returned to active duty being killed in 1944...

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

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    Default Baykowski & Grzanka

    JULIUSZ BAYKOWSKI born 12 Sept. 1900
    1918 finished Gymnasium in Kiev
    1918 joined Polish Army then AF
    1930 flying accident
    1933-1935 Aviation journalist, worked for ‘’Lot Polski” ("Polish Flight" - aviation magazine)
    December 1940 – Lyon, France – Interpreter
    July 1940 – PAF Depot Blackpool
    November 1941 – Blackpool – Interpreter
    March 1942 – No. 307 Polish (Night Fighter) Squadron
    August 1943 – Blackpool
    September 1943 – No. 303 Polish Squadron – Interpreter
    November 1943 – 131 Polish Fighter Wing – Interpreter
    December 1944 – 133 Polish Fighter Wing – Interpreter
    April 1945 – HQ of Polish Air Force – Administration Duties
    April 1946 – Polish Resettlement Corps
    Kapitan, F/Lt (A/S/Ldr) P-0634
    Died 20 January 1984, London

    ROMAN GRZANKA born 10 Feb. 1902 in Ujna Wielka
    Graduated from Polish Air Force College (1st promotion)
    In 1927 posted to 1st Air Regiment in Warsaw, 14th Flight as an observer
    Completed fighter training in 2nd Air Regiment, Cracow
    Posted to 113th Fighter Flight
    After accident –various duties on the ground in 1st Air Regiment
    AF Training Centre at Bydgoszcz (instructor, he flew again)
    After Polish Campaign 1939 via Romania went to France (
    After arrival in England ferry pilot in 4 FPP, 8 FPP and 10 FPP (August 1940 – June 1941)
    10 MU June 1941 – September 1942
    54 OTU September 1942 – December 1942
    December 1942 – posted to No. 307 Polish (Night Fighter) Squadron
    Killed in flying accident on 27 June 1943 when Mosquito II EW-Y DD644 crashed in Penarth near Swansea, buried at Pembery Cemetery
    Kapitan, F/Lt P-0191
    Last edited by Peter S; 6th November 2011 at 10:08.

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    Default Polish AF amputees

    Many thanks Peter and Pavel

    Excellent information, much appreciated.

    Pavel - are you able to provide more information (squadrons etc) re Sgt Kadlec, including relevant dates?

    Peter - have you any information re other Polish AF amputees?

    Cheers
    Brian

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    Default G/Cpt Bajan

    G/Cpt Jerzy Bajan (winner of the Challenge 1934) was badly injured in the left hand during Deblin bombardment ( Sept. 1939); whilst in England - although his hand wasn't amputated - he occasionally flew having a hook attached to his hand.

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    P/O Zdzisław Radomski of 306 Sqn was wounded over France (due to some sources lost his hand already in the air, due to another he had it amputated), and after recovery attempted to fly, but I think not very successfuly.
    Bayowski was a quite well known writer, unfortunately forgotten, and I do not think his wartime writing was ever published, but few excerpts. Reputedly he once almost caused a crash, when his artifical leg locked controls of RWD-8 plane. He later used it to wave the people on the ground (from the air of course).

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    Default others

    Brian

    I assume that you are after Polish amputees who continued flying after their body parts were amputated?

    F/Sgt Waclaw Korwel from 308 Sqn was badly wounded on 18th August 1943 while fighting with Focke Wulfs. He had plastic surgery (‘’The Guinea Club Member”) and three fingers of his left hand were amputated, but he flew operationally again. One of the members of PAF murdered by the Communist Regime after returning to Poland.

    Re F/O Zdzislaw Radomski from 306 Sqn. His arm was almost shot off during operation over Calais on 27th August 1941. He returned to England and landed at Deal.

    Sgt Brunon Godlewski, rear A/G of Wellingtom SM-S R1525 from 305 Sqn was defending his a/c whilst being attacked by night fighters during mission on 5/6 March 1943 lost both his arms.
    (obviously these two didn't fly again)
    Last edited by Peter S; 6th November 2011 at 12:38.

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    Default Polish AF amputees

    Yes, Peter, I am, but thanks anyway for the additional information.

    Actually, I am keen to learn of aircrew of all nationalities who continued to fly following limb amputations, and also the loss of an eye.

    Cheers
    Brian

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    There was a Herc Captain (on Op CORPORATE) who only had sight in one eye. I flew with him on a number of occasions. That is fact.
    There was (so I was told) another Herc Captain who also only had sight of one eye. This was the 'other' eye - so to speak.
    I was told that on one occasion they flew together. I was told that on take-off/landing they flew with the 'good' eyes on the outboard sides. But on the AAR slots on the Airbridge they changed seats so that the 'good' eyes were on the 'inside'. Over to you!!!!!!
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Last edited by Resmoroh; 6th November 2011 at 15:52.
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Default

    Radomski did little flying, albeit not operational. If I recall correctly, he mentioned in one of interviews, that he exeperienced some trouble, and could not operate properly with his artifical hand, hence ceased flying at all.

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