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Thread: "force-landed" or "forced-landed"?

  1. #1
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    Default "force-landed" or "forced-landed"?

    A technical question - is there a correct format, "force-landed" or "forced-landed"?

    I see both used and they appear to me to be interchangeable - i.e. in the least, choose one and stick with it. I appreciate that an aircraft makes a forced landing, but have always tended to err in the direction of the use of "force-landed", rather than "forced-landed", which I've always felt - for right or wrong - just 'doesn't sound right'.

    It appears that opinions differ, so I guess my question is whether it would be considered strictly wrong if I were to write of a pilot "force-landing" a damaged aircraft (for whatever reason), as opposed to him "forced-landing" a damaged aircraft?

    Opinions appreciated.

    Thanks
    Steve
    41 (F) Squadron RAF at War and Peace, April 1916-March 1946
    http://brew.clients.ch/41sqnraf.htm

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    It carried out a forced landing (maybe, but it reads a bit clunky). It carried out a force-landing. It force-landed. It was forced to land. I think you could say "This is the site of a forced landing", but in that case there would be no hyphen.

    Force-landing is right, as much as any piece of English can be said to be "right", for the language is a changing thing and those with cloth ears may gain a majority.

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    Graham is right. It is not idiomatic English to use a double past participle, as in forced-landed. And though the language is constantly changing, often in ways I shudder at, I doubt this particular feature will change.

    David

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    Thanks guys, that basically backs up how I felt about the usage, too.

    Regards
    Steve
    41 (F) Squadron RAF at War and Peace, April 1916-March 1946
    http://brew.clients.ch/41sqnraf.htm

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    My two cents worth:

    It is a forced landing, no hyphen. "Forced" is the modifier, "landing" is the noun. Hence, you decline the noun, but the modifier remains the same.

    Forced landing.
    Forced landed.
    Forced lands.

    But, as David and Graham said, English constantly changes. Also, local dialects are acceptable, maybe my version is Canadian only. As long as your reader understands your intent, it is correct.

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    I have always used 'A forced landing' and no hyphen

    Norman

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    I am happy to see, that you do not have English as a 2nd language to be in doubt about spelling, use of hyphens etc. :-)

    Mikkel
    Britain's Victory, Denmark's Freedom. Danish Volunteers in Allied Air Forces During the Second World War
    fb.me/britainsvictorydenmarksfreedom
    danishww2pilots.dk - a resource on Danish aircrew during the Second World War

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    However, I think you should look seriously at those 'Drivers, Airframe' who have suffered this unintentional connection with "terra firma". I would hazard a guess that none of them were too concerned with the declination of nouns, and/or subjunctive adverbs?!!!
    As has been said though, "A Good Landing is one that you can walk away from". If, after a landing, you can't taxi on full power then something is not quite right!!!!!!!!!!!!
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    True, but the original posting was a genuine question about English usage. It deserves a genuine answer in the spirit it was posed.

    Garbling the grammar/syntax can lead to errors in communication. It's a good idea to get it right, or at least conform to normal usage. Arguably the same thing in linguistics.

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    Actually, English is my second language. My first is Canadian, a local dialect of proper English.

    My wife, an english teacher, offers the following comments.

    "Forced" can be an adverb for the verb "landing", and therefore does not get declined. It remains "forced", as per my previous post.

    She suggests that it may be less confusing to use "forced landing" as a noun phrase. Instead of "He forced landed" use "He made a forced landing". Similarily, "He makes a forced landing", "He will make a forced landing", etc.

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