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    Default 84 Group Communication Squuadron

    Morning all,
    Trying to work out what the above named unit may have been engaged on and what aircraft it might have had on strength. I have a posting to it between September 1944 and January 1945 for AUS412624 F/L Leo McAuliffe - he was previously with 222 Sqn from Dec43-Sep44 and then went back to 222 again afterwards until he was KIA 17MAR45. 222 was part of 84 Group so it appears to be a short 'attachment', perhaps as a rest from combat duties?

    Anyone able to shed any light?

    Adam

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    Hi Adam

    Communication squadrons and flights were operated to provide facilities for delivering goods and personnel between HQs and units as well as providing aircraft for staff officers to use to retain currency.

    During its life it used a wide variety of types including: - Ansons, Oxfords, Spitfires, Hudsons, Proctors, Typhoons, Vigilants, Messengers, Storch, SM82, Hurricanes and Masters

    Malcolm

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    Hello Adam,

    I have No. 84 Group Communication Squadron ORB for September and October 1944, as this unit was based at B43 Arques Fort Rouge, near St Omer, in September, for two weeks. Unfortunately the microfilm is of very poor quality and the digital picturess I made can't do miracles.

    I confirm McAuliffe's name is in it, as I've used the ORB for Hugues Chevalier's next book. He was posted in from No. 222 (Natal) Squadron on the 10th of September. It was just before the Communication Squadron arrived at Arques, and No. 222 Squadron, part of No. 135 Wing, arrived at B53 Merville in the following days, a stone's throw from B43.

    Very few flights are recorded (not all to my humble opinion) and for example F/L McAuliffe flew ADLS mail to 2nd Army Corps on 23 September 1944, in Auster 285, and he flew in Auster 315 on 26th September 1944 to B48 and B61.

    As this is "local" for me, I'm quite interested in this pilot.

    Have you received my card ?

    Joss
    Last edited by jossleclercq; 30th January 2012 at 16:26.

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    Default No.84 Group Communication Squadron Awards

    Of possible interest to you (and maybe not):

    COLLINS, John Bernard, F/L (125490, RAFVR*) - No.84 Group Communications Squadron, No.3 Air Despatch Letter Service Flight - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1946. Public Record Office Air 2/9144, courtesy of Steve Brew, has citation drafted when he had flown 1,815 hours, 310 on current duties and 204 in previous six months.

    "This officer completed 200 hours operational flying before assuming command of the Test Flight at this Unit in September 1944. During the past nine months he has been responsible for the testing of all aircraft prior to their despatch to the Continent. On many occasions, when aircraft were urgently required for reinforcing the Group, he has worked long hours to ensure that commitments were fulfilled. His great keenness, together with his tact in dealing with those under his charge, has undoubtedly done much to create a most efficient section which has dealt so ably with aircraft prior to their transfer to operational wings. His flight has been responsible for testing nearly 2,000 aircraft."

    DAVIS, Jack, F/L (50555, Royal Air Force) - No.84 Group Communications Squadron - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 April 1945. Public Record Office Air 2/9061, courtesy of Steve Brew, has citation. Flying hours not stated.

    "This officer is the personal pilot to the General Officer Commanding, First Canadian Army and has held this appointment since before the invasion of Normandy. He has flown the Commander and Senior Staff Officers of this Army on many and varied missions, involving over 100 flying, often in extremely bad weather conditions and within range of enemy anti-aircraft fire. This officer has displayed admirable flying skill, determination and willingness and has shouldered considerable responsibilities conscientiously at all times to the complete satisfaction of General Crerar. His conduct has been worthy of the highest praise."

    MISKIN, Christopher Robert, Corporal (1517322, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve) - No.84 Group Communication Squadron - British Empire Medal - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 September 1945. Public Record Office Air 2/9056 has recommendation.

    "Corporal Miskin is a fitter who has proved himself to be an exceptionally efficient tradesman and airman. He was detached to No.84 Group Main Headquarters at Amblie, in Normandy, ten days after D Day as Non-Commissioned Officer in charge of the Auster Flight and has performed his duties in a most exemplary manner, often working under very poor and arduous conditions. By his untiring and painstaking efforts he maintained the aircraft on his charge at a high degree of serviceability under very trying circumstances. He has inspired all who have worked with him by his extreme alertness and endurance."

    SANFORD, Maurice Edward, Sergeant (547875, Royal Air Force) - No.84 Group Communications Squadron - British Empire Medal - awarded as per London Gazette dated 13 June 1946. Public Record Office Air 2/9668, courtesy of Tom Thorne, has citation.

    "This Non-Commissioned Officer is the Sergeant Fitter in charge of maintenance, in which capacity he has served since March 1944. At the time of the invasion of Normandy the Communication Squadron was engaged in conveying passengers, many of them of the V.I.P. category, from advanced landing grounds under conditions totally unsuited for passenger aircraft. In spite of the poor facilities and the constant moves, Sergeant Sanford managed to maintain the aircraft inspection routine and to keep aircraft serviceable. Since the cessation of hostilities the squadron has averaged approximately 1,000 flying hours a month with 74 aircraft to maintain, some of which were German and Italian. The thoroughness with which Sergeant Sanford has accomplished his task is evident by the absence of any structural failures and the very low accident rate of the squadron. In spite of the large reduction in the number of ground crews due to demobilisation, this Non-Commissioned Officer has endeavoured to train replacements and keep up the high standard of serviceability. Since the squadron has been using ex-enemy aircraft, this Non-Commissioned Officer has used his initiative and engineering knowledge to keep them serviceable and has insisted on flying on tests of the aircraft before they are put into service. His keenness and example, and his untiring energy have contributed largely to keeping the aircraft of the squadron flying. His work has been excellent and his example to his men beyond reproach."

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    Great post Hugh,
    Adds considerably to the "bare bones" earlier posting and definitely adds colour and some drama!
    David D

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    Thanks all, that throws a little bit of light on the subject, which for this project is all I was looking for.

    Joss - did get your card, thank you. The interest here comes from where F/L McAuliffe is buried, in Hellendoorn, the Netherlands. My family and I lived in the next town in 1995 and, when we discovered that he was the only Australian out of 15 war graves there, we 'adopted' him so to speak. We got limited information through the RAAF on our return to Australia in 1996 (in the days before the NAA digitised their records!) but it's only now that I've been able to go through his service record and A705 file to pull what I can out to put into a little write-up for my father.
    I'll send you a proper email in the next couple of days.

    Best wishes,
    Adam

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