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Thread: De-Havilland Mosquito

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    Default De-Havilland Mosquito

    Hello. Newbie to this so looking for help please. I have been informed by my daughter that in some woodland near her home, DE-HAVILLAND MOSQUITO HJ645 crash landed due to engine failure and was a total write off. Having received a Metal Detector for christmas, I am keen to look around the actual crash site; I cannot pin-point the site so could anyone tell me how I could find out more information, if there is any, on the actual crash site.
    PS. I am an ex-RAF Search and Rescue winchman, tours on Puma and Wessex helicopters and VC10 fixed-wing, I am not a 'treasure-hunter', only interested in aircraft and there histories. Many thanks.

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    Chris,

    I don't think you will find much of this aircraft as it was'nt an actual crash as such. It belly landed in a field at Hadnall, Salop.

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    Default Chrisk

    Quote Originally Posted by AlanW View Post
    Chris,

    I don't think you will find much of this aircraft as it was'nt an actual crash as such. It belly landed in a field at Hadnall, Salop.
    Thanks Alan, probably saved me from getting muddy; much appreciated.

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    However,

    Sometimes even a belly landing will give up such things as plates and the odd rusty nuts and bolt. Still some interesting stuff to be found.

    Never let yourself be put off when you find nothing. Just tell yourself you will find it next time.

    It can be hard but when you find a really nice piece it is all worth it.
    Regards Scott McIntosh

    ACIA Researcher

    Search for Air Crash Investigation & Archaeology on Facebook for our groups page.

  5. #5
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    The ORB records:

    "Accident to Mosquito II HJ.645 at Williams Farm, Hadnall, Shrewsbury.
    J/21940 F/O Reid G S (Pupil Pilot) - Uninjured
    The Pilot, after taking off on a cross country exercise had trouble in getting his undercarriage fully retracted, so did not change over from outer to main tanks until after he had set course over the aerodrome. When he changed tanks he informed his navigator "Changed to Inner Tanks" in order that this might be recorded in the log.

    Unknown to him however was the fact that the Navigator misinterpreted his message and switched the cocks back to the outer tanks believing he was turning on to mains. When turning over Shrewsbury the starboard engine gave out so he instructed the Navigator to check the fuel cocks, as although he had previously thought he was running on main tanks he now realiased that he was on outers as the outer tank gauge registered empty.

    He states that he had not noticed this before as he was keeping a look out for Shrewsbury. The port engine then failed and although he endeavoured to change tanks, by this time the aircraft was very low and had lost speed so he decided to put down in a small field ahead. He did so with his undercarriage up and the aircraft came to rest afterskidding a short way across the field and going through a hedge. The Pilot was uninjured."

    Reminds me of a Tornado crash in Germany where the nav caused ejection from a servicable aircraft both crew surviving. W/C Spry said the report contained the line
    " on examination after the crash the navigator was found to have facial injuries not conjusive with ejection!"

    Regards
    Ross
    The Intellectual Property contained in this message has been assigned specifically to this web site.
    Copyright Ross McNeill 2015/2018 - All rights reserved.

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    I recall that at one Mosquito crash site a number of small self-tapping screws were recently recovered. These were used to hold pieces of wood together while the glue dried, and were left in the aircraft.
    Last edited by Bill Walker; 5th February 2012 at 19:48. Reason: grammer

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