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Thread: Edmunds Trainers

  1. #1
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    Default Edmunds Trainers

    Is anyone able to shed any light on "Edmunds Trainers"?

    RAF Long Newnton (Wiltshire) had a "Link Trainer and Edmunds Trainer" Building. The Link Trainer is well known but the internet throws up nothing on the Edmunds Trainer.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.
    Last edited by PeteT; 22nd March 2012 at 11:53. Reason: Spelling error

  2. #2
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    Default Edmunds Trainers

    I have been provided with this information (airfieldinformationexchange forum) so I thought I would add it up on here for completeness (just in case the question crops up again)

    "The name of this device is usually mispelled as Edmunds or Edmonds; it was invented by F/O Morgan Rice Edmondes. There were a large number of gunnery training simulators in use throughout WWII This particular device was one of a number of 'dual purpose' synthetic trainers for gunnery and recognition.

    It instructed fighter pilots in deflection shooting combined with aircraft recognition and range judging, using a standard Link trainer. This was fitted with a reflector sight (modified for the purpose) and a spotlight triggered by a firing a button on the control column. At the required distance from the Link, a 1:48 scale model aircraft was positioned 6.5 ft from the ground and mounted on a castored trolley. A 'deflection' graph was also positioned 3 ft from the floor

    On the floor in front of the 'aircraft' were painted a number of arcs of circles worked out from the pivot point from the Link. These were at intervals of 37.5 in (representing ranges from 150 yds to 600 yds at 50 yds increments).

    The trainee flew the Link to ‘attack’ the model which then moved to simulate an aircraft under attack. When the pilot considered he was in range, he pressed his trigger in short bursts and the beam of light from the spotlight registered on the graph, the instructor immediately read off the range from the arcs on the floor and the errors shown on the graph. The instructor was in communication with the pilot, giving advice and corrrecting his aim throughout the simulation.

    I think the prototype went to Grangemouth, and was intended for all Fighter Command OTUs, and Group I SFTS, (plus a few Gp.II).

    A report described it as very effective and extremely simple to construct, though it required a fair amount of floor space"

    Source: AIR20 /6058 Synthetic Training Devices, AIR2 /8785 Synthetic Training Committee (STC) reports.

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