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Thread: "Moscowed"

  1. #1
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    Default "Moscowed"

    Hello,



    While going through the ORB of 5 SAAF Squadron, I've found at several time the word in "Moscowed" as in for example:

    Lt. v. d. Spuy took part in a sweep, "Moscowed" and returned early at 12:45.



    Is there anyone who knows what they meant by "Moscowed"?



    Best wishes/Håkan
    WWII Biplane Fighter Aces
    http://surfcity.kund.dalnet.se

    WWII Biplane Fighter Aces Blog
    http://ww2biplanefighteraces.blogspot.com/

  2. #2
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    Default

    Hakan, Hi,
    Nobody seems to want to play with you!
    Try this for 'thinking outside the box'! http://www.angelfire.com/id/100sqn/gremlins.html.
    You never know, it might have some connection!
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

  3. #3
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    Default

    Hello Peter,

    Yep, seems that nobody want's to take the ball... ;)
    The term must have some sort of connections to "gremlins" or something like that but I still thought it interesting since it was so specific - "Moscowed"!
    I guess I have to search through the ORB from the very beginning to see when it appears for the first time (I have 2 on 3 June 1942).

    Best wishes/Håkan
    WWII Biplane Fighter Aces
    http://surfcity.kund.dalnet.se

    WWII Biplane Fighter Aces Blog
    http://ww2biplanefighteraces.blogspot.com/

  4. #4
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    Default

    Just thinking out loud but was the term 'Moscowed' used in the context of the German advance on Moscow in Late 1941 when they were in sight of the target but never quite got there?

  5. #5
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    Default

    Hallo Hakan,

    I think (guess ?) the term is uniquely South African, or maybe more strictly Afrikaans. It appears to indicate engine trouble during flight, necessitating a landing.

    By happy circumstance I received in the post TODAY a copy of 'SPRINGBOK FIGHTER VICTORY, Vol. 5' by Michael Schoeman. On browsing through it on page 180 I saw the term 'moscowed' ! Apparently Captain Peter Venter in a 10 Squadron SAAF Kittyhawk during a ferry flight in June 1942 "conveniently moscowed" when he passed over his home town and "carried out a very efficient forced landing".

    There are probably more references to this term elsewhere in this excellent series.

    Regards,

    Martin Gleeson.

  6. #6
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    Thanks Martin for the hint!

    Best wishes/Håkan
    WWII Biplane Fighter Aces
    http://surfcity.kund.dalnet.se

    WWII Biplane Fighter Aces Blog
    http://ww2biplanefighteraces.blogspot.com/

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