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Thread: Identification of a Smith timer 14B/2375

  1. #1
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    Default Identification of a Smith timer 14B/2375

    I will be very grateful, if somebody here can help me to identify, tell me the age and the purpose of an old Smith mechanical timer, bought yesterday on a local market here in Denmark.

    The manufacturer is Smith, but not Smiths, which I know very well from my youth.

    It is a 60 SECONDS timer to be adjusted to an interval up to 12 minutes.

    An extern retractable lever can be pushed up to the minute dial.

    By contact, I suppose a circuit can be connected or disconnected (have not yet tried with bulb, battery and wire).

    The electrical terminal is two brass bolts situated to the right below the lever.

    It is a wooden case, on dial stamped SmitH lever 14B/2375.

    Wind up is done by the strings you see below. The two plugs can be connected.

    I have uploaded a photo here:

    http://www.billedeupload.dk/images/pSG5b.jpg


    Best regards

    Finn Buch
    Last edited by Argus; 21st May 2012 at 18:56.

  2. #2
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    There is this summary description at http://www.nationaltrustcollections.org.uk/object/964927 relating to an object at their Merseyside Museum (but no picture so I don't know if it matches and it has no explanation)

    Summary description

    A square wooden cased timing clock with a metal hanging hook and two metal wall fixings to back. A circular metal framed glass covered dial with large graduated sixty second markings and a small 'minute' dial. A large metal finger with a green luminous pointer. two small metal ringed holes to base of timer, one has a length of string and one has two shorter lengths of twine.

    Marks and inscriptions

    SECONDS. SMITH LEVER. 14B/2375 Minutes

    I have also found this link which suggests that it was a stop watch, possibly used in RAF Photo Labs

    http://www.museumoftechnology.org.uk/expand.php?key=701

    No idea if this is any use, but it may be a point of reference to start you off on your quest ... good luck

    Regards

    Pete
    Last edited by PeteT; 22nd May 2012 at 12:14. Reason: More Information
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

  3. #3
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    Many thanks to Pete for the Merseyside Museum's link.

    On "The Military Watch Resource" Forum, I've found another Smith(s) timer in bakelite with the AM stamp on backside. Also the type with a string, and same kind of dial, but much newer.

    WWII RAF RCAF AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS DARKROOM TIMER CLOCK BAKELITE SMITHS LONDON

    Link:

    http://www.mwrforum.net/forums/showthread.php?t=51092

    Best regards

    Finn Buch

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    Default

    I still can't work out what the extra lever is on your clock; perhaps they had found a way to "automate" the development process and the lever switched off the film processing after the requisite time.
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

  5. #5
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    Hi Pete,

    I have another photo below. You have the minute hand, and then the lever, where you can see a pin. If you place the lever on for example 2 minutes on the dial, the contact will then be made between the lever and the minute hand after the 2 minutes. First you have to reset the minute hand by a string. A second string will wind up the timer.

    http://www.billedeupload.dk/images/Rzqx8.jpg

    A home-made system of same kind was used by the resistance during WW II.


    Best regards

    Finn Buch

  6. #6
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    Finn

    I can't access the picture, but it doesn't matter.

    Your item certainly seems to have started off as the standard RAF darkroom clock; why it was adpated and how it was used may well remain a mystery.

    Regards

    Pete
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

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