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Thread: Sqn Ldr Kellow, 489 Sqn, KIFA 5 June 1944

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    Default Sqn Ldr Kellow, 489 Sqn, KIFA 5 June 1944

    Hello,

    on 5 June 1944 Sqn Ldr Kellow of 489 Sqn RNZAF was killed in a flying accident in England. Can someone provide the details of this accident ? I tried with Google but was not successful...

    Thanks in advance

    Laurent

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    Just a snippet, but it might provide a start point:

    5 Jun 1944 - Dual pilot day training

    89825 Sqn Ldr Stanley William KELLOW, DFC; RAFVR
    NZ414958 Fg. Off. Douglas Launcelot Blackmore CHAPMAN, RNZAF.
    Fg. Off. Sydney FREEMAN RAFVR
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

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    They were flying from RAF Langham. The Death is Registered at Fakenham (Langham was in the Fakenham registration area). Our NZ experts might be able to give some more details from Chapman's data.
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Gents

    Beaufighter LZ435 stalled on approach to Langham on this day.
    Regards
    DaveW

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    From my 'For Your Tomorrow - A record of New Zealanders who have died while serving with the RNZAF and Allied Air Services since 1915 (Volume Two: Fates 1943-1998)':

    Mon 5 Jun 1944

    COASTAL COMMAND
    Dual pilot day training
    489 Squadron, RNZAF (Langham, Norfolk - 16 Group)
    Beaufighter TF.X LZ435 - took off at about 1135 piloted by Sqn Ldr S W Kellow, DFC, RAF, stalled, crashed and burned out when coming in to land at 1205. The two pilots and RAF navigator died, the RNZAF airman being buried at Cambridge. Although no primary cause for the accident could be established, it was thought that an engine may have failed.
    Pilot u/t: NZ414958 Fg Off Douglas Launcelot Blackmore CHAPMAN, RNZAF - Age 24. 934hrs.

    From Vol Three, an amendment:

    was returning from a bombing demonstration. About 1000 yards from touch down point seen to wobble slightly then turn to port, whereupon port wing dropped and aircraft turned over on to its back and crashed nose first into the ground.

    Errol

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    Thanks a lot for these extensive and useful answers.

    Best regards

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    Dived inverted into ground from about 200 feet while on approach to land. The wartime map ref was G466609 for what its worth.

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    Default Possible flight path

    Something doesn't quite hang together on this one (in the interest of accuracy!!)
    One post says it dived into the ground from about 200 feet. At what distance from touch-down (under normal conditions) would the a/c be at 200 feet?
    Another post says it was seen to wobble about 1000 yards out, the port wing dropped and it flipped over - turning to the left. This might suggest a failure of the port engine. The wind was probably fairly well down the runway. Any cross-wind component would proably have been from left to right.
    My decoding of the quoted wartime Cassini grid for the impact point puts it at somewhere near 52.94N 00.98E - i.e. north of the extended runway centre-line. This might indicate a failure of the starboard engine, with the consequent dropping of the starboard wing. Any left to right cross-wind would have accentuated the overturning to the inverted position (the accounts all seem to agree on this!).
    I am not being pedantic about this one just for the sake of it. But detailed detective work on the given data can often throw up surprising results. Any Cassini experts and aeronauts out there willing to check this one out?
    Rgds
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    All I can add is that Langham was notorious for cross-winds, sitting as it did on an exposed part of the N Norfolk coast. There were a number of aircraft of various types which had take-off and landing accidents caused by this.

    BC

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    A good first approximation for a standard aircraft final approach is a 3 degree glideslope, a little steeper if slipping or if you have really good flaps. Assuming 3 degrees and 200 foot altitude would place the aircraft about 3800 feet from the aiming point (if I remember how to do the math). A steeper approach could be shorter.

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