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    Default RAF Oulton Norfolk

    Can anyone please give me more information about the all black painted Liberators stationed at RAF Oulton towards the end of 1944. I lived at Corpusty then and can remember seeing them come into land. There were no markings as far as I could recall on these planes

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    hello David,

    if you google RAF oulton you can find lots of information out there on operations from the field during the war:
    http://www.raf.mod.uk/bombercommand/s26.html

    No 100 Group, 223 Squadron Liberators, Flying Mandrel operations.
    http://www.raf.mod.uk/bombercommand/h223.html


    Confound and destroy: 100 Group and the bomber support campaign
    by Martin Streetly


    City of Norwich Air Museum has the archvies of 100 Group Association
    http://www.cnam.co.uk/

    http://www.cnam.co.uk/raf100/index.php
    Dennis Burke
    - Dublin

    Foreign Aircrew and Aircraft Ireland 1939-1945
    www.ww2irishaviation.com

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    David,

    Seek out a copy of the following book:

    Special Ops Liberators:223 (Bomber Support) Squadron, 100 group, and the Electronic War.
    Bond,Steve & Richard Forder
    London:Grub Street,2011.
    ISBN-13: 9781908117144

    It will answer practically any question you have on the Oulton-based Libs.

    Ask your local library to buy in a copy.

    Col.
    Last edited by COL BRUGGY; 18th June 2012 at 16:35.

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    Default RAF Oulton

    Hi David

    I did a number of years' research on 214 Sqn which shared Oulton with 223 Sqn in 1944/5, and have visited the old airfield a couple of times. The reason being that we had a family friend who flew as an air gunner with 214 from Oulton at the very end of the war. I guess you might know that the Officers' Mess was at Blickling Hall (now National Trust), where there's a good little 'museum' room with displays and information about Oulton in the war years.

    223 Sqn (B-24 Liberators) and 214 Sqn (B-17 Fortresses) were both Special Duties squadrons involved in radio countermeasures in support of Bomber Command raids during this period. 214's a/c (I assume 223's as well) carried no bombs on these ops but were modified to carry all sorts of radar jamming equipment and/or the usual loads of 'Window' radar-confusing foil strips.

    Thus equipped, they'd send out a few a/c (along with other types from 100 Group) to accompany the main raids and try to make things more complicated for the German defences. They might achieve this by setting up a thing called a Mandrel Screen (basically a 'wall' of jamming that the German early warning radar couldn't see through to spot the oncoming bombers), or by jamming German control radars and communications as they went along, or by helping create the radar-screen illusion of a (spoof) raid to fool the Germans that the main raid was going somewhere while it was actually headed somewhere completely different, thereby hoping to divert their nightfighters. As well as its 'heavies', 100 Group would send out Mosquito nightfighters to attack enemy airfields, or to try to hunt down enemy nightfighters in flight.

    These aircraft were camouflaged similar to the RAF's Lancasters and Halifaxes (green and brown upper sides and black underneath), and carried normal markings and squadron codes.

    All in all 100 Group was a fascinating organisation, comprising a mixture of squadrons flying Liberators, Fortresses, Halifaxes, Stirlings, and Mosquitos. All very cutting edge technology and tactics at the time.

    Hope this short note helps. I recommend the books mentioned above. Also 'Confounding the Reich' by Martin Bowman and Tom Cushing.

    Regards

    Ian
    Last edited by ianh; 18th June 2012 at 19:36.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ianh View Post
    Hi David

    I did a number of years' research on 214 Sqn which shared Oulton with 223 Sqn in 1944/5, and have visited the old airfield a couple of times. The reason being that we had a family friend who flew as an air gunner with 214 from Oulton at the very end of the war. I guess you might know that the Officers' Mess was at Blickling Hall (now National Trust), where there's a good little 'museum' room with displays and information about Oulton in the war years.

    223 Sqn (B-24 Liberators) and 214 Sqn (B-17 Fortresses) were both Special Duties squadrons involved in radio countermeasures in support of Bomber Command raids during this period. 214's a/c (I assume 223's as well) carried no bombs on these ops but were modified to carry all sorts of radar jamming equipment and/or the usual loads of 'Window' radar-confusing foil strips.

    Thus equipped, they'd send out a few a/c (along with other types from 100 Group) to accompany the main raids and try to make things more complicated for the German defences. They might achieve this by setting up a thing called a Mandrel Screen (basically a 'wall' of jamming that the German early warning radar couldn't see through to spot the oncoming bombers), or by jamming German control radars and communications as they went along, or by helping create the radar-screen illusion of a (spoof) raid to fool the Germans that the main raid was going somewhere while it was actually headed somewhere completely different, thereby hoping to divert their nightfighters. As well as its 'heavies', 100 Group would send out Mosquito nightfighters to attack enemy airfields, or to try to hunt down enemy nightfighters in flight.

    These aircraft were camouflaged similar to the RAF's Lancasters and Halifaxes (green and brown upper sides and black underneath), and carried normal markings and squadron codes.

    All in all 100 Group was a fascinating organisation, comprising a mixture of squadrons flying Liberators, Fortresses, Halifaxes, Stirlings, and Mosquitos. All very cutting edge technology and tactics at the time.

    Hope this short note helps. I recommend the books mentioned above. Also 'Confounding the Reich' by Martin Bowman and Tom Cushing.

    Regards

    Ian
    Hi Ian,

    Many thanks for your comprehensive reply. I am aware of the museum at Blickling Hall - well worth a visit as you know. Just shows what was going on at the time but very little has been said since. I will read the books.
    Incidentally, I learned to drive my first car on the runway at RAF Oulton as parts still remain (Bernard Matthews has not got his hands on it yet!)

    Best wishes
    David

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    Quote Originally Posted by dennis_burke View Post
    hello David,

    if you google RAF oulton you can find lots of information out there on operations from the field during the war:
    http://www.raf.mod.uk/bombercommand/s26.html

    No 100 Group, 223 Squadron Liberators, Flying Mandrel operations.
    http://www.raf.mod.uk/bombercommand/h223.html


    Confound and destroy: 100 Group and the bomber support campaign
    by Martin Streetly


    City of Norwich Air Museum has the archvies of 100 Group Association
    http://www.cnam.co.uk/

    http://www.cnam.co.uk/raf100/index.php
    Hello Dennis,

    I will do as you suggest. RAF Oulton is situated about a mile from my birthplace - hence the interest.

    Many thanks

    David

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