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Thread: Abbreviations of RAF units

  1. #1
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    Default Abbreviations of RAF units

    I've just received the service record of wartime casualty (Cpl Edwin James Hedley-Smith) and unfortunately the abbreviations used for his units do not appear in the accompanying list. I'd appreciate your advice:

    No 2 HQ CFF (there for a month in March 1940)
    C&M Party Norwich (April 1940) (I thought C&M was 'Care and Maintenance')
    HQ X Force (May to 26 June). I assume this is HQ Expeditionary Force - if so where was it located in May 1940?

    I's also appreciate the locations of:
    No 10 London TC (what was it)
    8 FTS

    Also the meaning of the following in the 'Reason' (for the movement) column
    H
    HH
    G
    X

    TIA
    Brian
    Last edited by Lyffe; 5th July 2012 at 19:31.

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    Mmm, not getting very far here.

    I've got 8 FTS as being at Montrose, which is one down, and
    No 2 HQ CFF is No 2 HQ Combined Forces in France (http://www.mikesofcardigan.demon.co.uk/page26.html and http://www.divetheworld.com/Library/RAFRelated/RAFAbbreviations.pdf) - but I still need a location.

    Brian

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    Hi Brian

    C&M is Care and Maintenance, so he was a member of a group of personnel tasked to look after a unit or location in Norwich

    Ross has mentioned previously that 'H' is Home, 'HH' is HQ Holding

    Malcolm

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    Thanks Malcolm, eventually found it - no reference to 'G' though.

    I guess No 10 London TC must be No 10 London Training Command,

    where induction and initial square bashing took place, but where would it have been in London?

    Brian

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    Brian

    I found the following, which maybe of help:

    It would appear the CFF may mean Component of Field Force. The National Archives has the following:

    "Subseries within AIR 24: H.Q. No. 1 R.A.F. COMPONENT OF FIELD FORCE, H.Q. No. 2 R.A.F. COMPONENT OF FIELD FORCE"

    A photograph on the IWM site has the following legend "The entrance to Headquarters of the Royal Air Force Component Field Force at Evreux, France" which may give you your location.

    Regards

    Pete
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

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    Brilliant Pete - that's extremely helpful and definitely a file I'll access on my next visit (whenever that may be). Just shows one has to be so careful with acronyms.

    Many thanks

    Brian

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    I have no idea whether the information I have given you fits in with your research. The photograph by the way is of Air Vice-Marshal C H B Blount (if that helps).

    I notice that there is a good write up about your man at: http://ecsosa.org.uk/theschool/memorial/edwinsmith.html

    Regards

    Pete
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

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    Much obliged Pete. I'd actually copied the item to ECSOSA for information with the proviso it was still being worked on as there was a lot of uncertainty about his service life before he joined the Arakaka - it's this I'm trying to sort out now.

    Thanks for the heads-up, I'll have to have a word with them.

    Brian

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    Brian

    You may already have this (or contributed towards it) but there is a bit more about CFF and the Met Unit in:

    http://www.rmets.org/pdf/hist07.pdf (Page for FRIDAY 10 MAY 1940)

    Regards

    Pete
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

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    Not one of mine Pete, but it's interesting that you should draw attention to it. It's not commonly known that small groups of RAFVR meteorologists were attached to Army Survey Regiments throughout the war, and some, in fact, landed on the Normandy beaches on D-day. Their task was to provide met information (upper winds and temperatures) to artillery units at the coal-face, as it were.

    To obtain the information (at least the winds) they released pilot balloons at regular intervals, day and night, and tracked them by theodolite to calculate winds at specific heights. This was usually done close (approx 5 miles or less) to the front line, and because their position was revealed by the balloons, they were often targeted by the enemy.

    Despite this I know of only one fatality, LAC Reginald Merridale (1802578), (attached to 7 Survey Regiment) who was killed by a random shell whilst making an ascent during the afternoon of 26 November 1944. He'd only been with his unit for 9 days.

    Brian

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