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Thread: April 11 1930 Hawker Hornet J9682 collided with 43 Sqn Siskin J9682 Drake/Brake/Blake

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    Default April 11 1930 Hawker Hornet J9682 collided with 43 Sqn Siskin J9682 Drake/Brake/Blake

    On April 11, 1930 The prototype Hawker Hornet, J9682 collided with 43 Sqn Siskin J9682 over Tangmere, Sussex.

    The pilot of the Siskin was P/O. John Heber Percy

    The pilot of the Hawker Hornet is quoted variously as

    F/O. K. S. Drake or H S Brake

    I can't find any Drake that matches, and searching for Brake in FlightGlobal is pointless as it
    is a common word!

    London Gazette has not helped as well

    I wonder if F/O. K. S. Drake could be Henry Leonard DRAKE who died (I believe the following year)

    Also I am beinging to strongly believe that "K S Drake/H S Brake" is actually Sgt. Pilot A. S. Blake of 1 Sqn.

    The reason is that the Hornet is supposed to be with 1 Sqn at the time

    Therefore I was wondering if anyone has a Air Force List for 1930/1931 to check out the names above

    Drake
    Blake
    Brake

    and can tie any to 1 Sqn I have established that no officer pilot of the name was with 43 Sqn at he time

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    Hi Paul,

    Feb 1930 AFL gives him as

    Kenneth S Brake posted into the Squadron on 1st April 1927

    My data base fills in the middle name as Stanley and his service number as 16217

    Regards
    Ross
    The Intellectual Property contained in this message has been assigned specifically to this web site.
    Copyright Ross McNeill 2015/2018 - All rights reserved.

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    Hello,

    Mid-air collisions were to be a major cause of aircraft losses in the inter-war years, though fortunately, most pilots were able to parachute to safety, unlike their First War predecessors. In April 1930 Flying Officer K S Brake of No.1 squadron and Pilot Officer J Heber-Percy of No.43 Squadron (Siskin IIIA J9359) took the inter-squadron rivalry a little too far. During a practice air-fighting sortie they collided at 3,000 feet. Brake was injured as his machine broke up, losing its top wing, though both pilots escaped successfully by parachute. Brake was flying J9682, the only Hawker Hornet built and the prototype of the Hawker Fury. Heber-Percy was to serve with Number One in 1936.

    Number One in War and Peace:The History of No.1 Squadron 1912 - 2000.
    Franks,Norman & Mike O'Connor.
    London:Grub Street,2000.
    p.66

    Col.
    Last edited by COL BRUGGY; 20th July 2012 at 11:37.

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    Ross/Co thanks

    another query successfully resolved!

    Kenneth Stanley Brake it is!

    Paul

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    There is a contradiction in the facts re J9682. ABS has it that the aircraft was written off after the collision but Putnam 'Hawker Aircraft' says 'J9682 paid two further visits to Martlesham late in 1930 before setting out on a tour of the Balkan countries early in 1931; a particularly successful visit to Yugoslavia undoubtedly led to that country's subsequent choice of Fury fighters.'

    regards
    DaveW

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    Default K. S Brake was my Grandfather!

    It was exciting to see his name mentioned on this forum.

    You all may be interested to know that they collided at 3 thousand feet when they both lost sight of each other.

    " the starboard win of my aircraft(hawker) struck the undercarriage of the siskin, tearing the wing completely away. My aircraft immediately when into a right hand spin"

    Extract from K S Brake letter to become a member of the caterpillar club.









    Quote Originally Posted by paulmcmillan View Post
    On April 11, 1930 The prototype Hawker Hornet, J9682 collided with 43 Sqn Siskin J9682 over Tangmere, Sussex.

    The pilot of the Siskin was P/O. John Heber Percy

    The pilot of the Hawker Hornet is quoted variously as

    F/O. K. S. Drake or H S Brake

    I can't find any Drake that matches, and searching for Brake in FlightGlobal is pointless as it
    is a common word!

    London Gazette has not helped as well

    I wonder if F/O. K. S. Drake could be Henry Leonard DRAKE who died (I believe the following year)

    Also I am beinging to strongly believe that "K S Drake/H S Brake" is actually Sgt. Pilot A. S. Blake of 1 Sqn.

    The reason is that the Hornet is supposed to be with 1 Sqn at the time

    Therefore I was wondering if anyone has a Air Force List for 1930/1931 to check out the names above

    Drake
    Blake
    Brake

    and can tie any to 1 Sqn I have established that no officer pilot of the name was with 43 Sqn at he time

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    Dear Debbie

    Thanks for your posting it is good to have Kenneth Brakes own views on this form his Caterpillar Club membership form

    I will also send you an email

    Since 2012 I have a bit more info on this and your grandfathers incident


    Saturday 12 April 1930 , Portsmouth Evening News , Hampshire, England
    PLANES COLLIDE 3,000 FEET UP.
    Thrills Near Chichester.
    PILOTS ESCAPE IN PARACHUTES.
    Land in Ploughed Field.
    CHICHESTER. Saturday. Two aeroplanes from the R.A.F. station at Tangmere, near Chichester, came into collision when travelling at high speed, 3,000 feet up, over the Halnaker district yesterday afternoon.
    The ’planes concerned were Siskin and experimental machine which were piloted by Pilot Officer H. Percy and Flying Officer Brake respectively.
    Both pilots made a safe landing in a ploughed field by making use of their parachutes
    Pilot Officer Percy was unhurt, but Flying Officer Brake was not so fortunate, landed with a broken arm and several cuts to his face, his injuries being apparently received in getting clear of his machine.
    The aeroplanes crashed about half mile apart.
    The Siskin overturned before striking the ground, and the other machine nose-dived, being almost buried in the earth.

    From Parachutes in Peace and War (1942) by "Professor" Archibald Montgomery Low (17 October 1888 - 13 September 1956) Pages 28 and 29 describes Brakes accident:
    The British concentrated on the "Guardian Angel," which was an excellent parachute of its type and continued to be used for many years. All these parachutes were of the static type, that is to say it was the weight of the airman falling that caused opening, and as this meant that he must be close to the plane, there were numerous accidents. A plane might fall in many different ways, so that escape from it in battle conditions was very different from escape under normal experiment. On at least one occasion the unfortunate pilot was swung into the propeller arc and cut to pieces by the blades. The pre-war experiments of Stevens, if they were known to the authorities, seem to have been forgotten. "Free" parachutes were discussed, but various objections were raised. One of the difficulties, suggested by those who tried to insist on a hundred per cent certainty, was that the airman might be injured in the course of the accident and therefore unable to operate the rip-cord. With the static line or automatic type of parachute, on the other hand, they argued, he would simply have to fall out of his cockpit and the parachute would open automatically. The argument is of the type likely to be advanced by those who have never flown, for the fact is that if an airman is so badly injured that he cannot pull a rip-cord somehow, he will be fortunate if he can get out of the cockpit.
    An incident at Tangmere aerodrome a few years after the Great War provided useful evidence for the supporters of the "free" parachute. Two fighters engaged in mock combat came into collision and one of the pilots when he tried to jump out was knocked down by the wing which had folded up. He was struck twice and fell from 3000 to 600 feet before getting free. He made a perfectly good landing and it was only then discovered that, when struck, his arm had been broken at the shoulder.

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    Thank you for the info Paul, I have PM'd you. My grandmother told the story that he had to crawl along to the tail of the aircraft while it was spinning and jump off at the tail end to get clear and that he was the only man able to do this. Its one of the stories that got more elaborate with time!

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