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Thread: Lost Ferry Command service files

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    Default Lost Ferry Command service files

    Hi everyone,

    My grandfather, Jack Wyndham, joined the Canadian Army (the Lorne Scotts) as a radio operator. Soon after, he was transferred to the RAF Ferry Command as a radio navigator and served in Boucherville and Gander. I've been trying to track down his service records, starting first with the Library and Archives Canada. They had nothing on him, and suggested I contact RAF Disclosures section. They apparently sent all records of non-commisioned men back to Canada after the war.

    Although he did receive his medals after the war, he was never able to get his pention due to the lose of his file. Has anyone else run into a similare problem when researching canadians who served in the Ferry Command? Any tips on how to proceed from here?

    Thanks for any help!

    Greg

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    We were just discussing these records the other day here on the forum:

    he might have a card in the DHH
    http://www.cmp-cpm.forces.gc.ca/dhh-dhp/index-eng.asp

    http://www.rafcommands.com/forum/showthread.php?13331-Ferry-Command-records-of-flights

    Can you confirm his full offcial name was Jack or was he John Peter Wyndham, I'm asking as I can check for his name in ancestry.com records too see if he passed through New York during the war on Ferry return flights./shipments.

    What do you mean by 'due to lose of his life', Did he loose his life in the war?
    Last edited by dennis_burke; 24th July 2012 at 13:11. Reason: whats his name
    Dennis Burke
    - Dublin

    Foreign Aircrew and Aircraft Ireland 1939-1945
    www.ww2irishaviation.com

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    Hi Dennis,

    His full name was John Steen Wyndham. I might have a possible service number for him, but I don't have that information with me at the moment, I can post it tonight.

    Also, it's lose of file, not life!

    Your post brings me to another question though. As far as I know, he did not fly on the ferry flights. It's my understanding that he was ground based. Does this make sense for a radio navigator, or would they have definetly flown?

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    Two possibilities come to mind, but these are just guesses.

    He may have been a ground based radio operator. This would match up with his Army training as a ground based radio operator.

    He may have been a civilian while with Ferry Command. A number of ground and flying positions with Ferry Command in North America were civilians. I'm not sure where you would find employment records of civilians for this time period.

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    Hi Bill,

    Civilian is a possibility, as I do have an employee ID of his for Consolidated Aircraft Corp. I just assumed this was something that was required as part of his duties. Does anybody know if civilians would have been in uniform? I ask this because I have his headdress with the Ferry Command badge on the front, and trade badges for the Radio Navigator trade. Also a picture of him in uniform in Boucheville, viewable here at bottom of page - http://oakvilleatwar.opl.on.ca/those_who_served_second.php

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    Sounds as though he could have been an employee of "Consairways", a civilian-run subsidiary of the Consolidated Aircraft Corporation of San Diego (later Consolidated-Vultee, or Convair), originally set up in 1941 to ferry Consolidated-built aircraft (PBY Catalinas, B-24 Liberators) to overseas customers (RAAF, RAF predominantly, also NEIAF I think, Catalinas), but later (April 1942) branched out into operating scheduled air transport services for the United States military, mostly across the Pacific to Australia, etc, but possibly also to other destinations. They continued to operate such services till the end of December 1945. There has been a least one book published by a former Consairways employee, "Eagles of the Pacific" by Edwin and Jeanne Spight, published 1980 (ISBN 0-911852-88-3). Needless to say, the Consairways transport schedules were operated by company-owned aircraft, all being various types of the basic B-24 design, including C-87s as well as LB-30s, British models and genuine B-24s.
    David D

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    Greg:

    If he did fly with Ferry Command as a radio operator he would have an aircrew assignment card, very likely filed at DHH (as noted in the earlier Ferry Command thread, some are missing). I believe the majority of Ferry Command aircrew were contract civilians after the early delivery flights and all had assignment cards.

    Robert

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    Greg:

    I have a colleague who would be willing to visit DHH and see if they have a card for your grandfather. Would you like me to go ahead and arrange?

    Robert

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    Robert, private msg sent. Thnx!

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    Hello Greg (if you're still there),

    Re: Boucherville RAF Flying Boat Base, 1940-46

    I just happened to find your 2012 post, and I registered in order to contact you. An acquaintance of mine, who is from Boucherville, is writing a book on flying boat activities in that village on the St-Lawrence, near Montréal. Boucherville was the seaplane base for the
    city before WWII, when flying boats dominated long-range aviation. However, it seems everybody assumes that it shut down for the war; he's from there, yet he did not know that the RAF took over the site until 1946; nobody else in town seems to know, and there are no records locally. It seems the locals had been advised to "not see what they were seeing", and indeed, a farmer whose house was above the facility, and who had been sworn to secrecy, died about 10 years ago without ever talking about what he saw during the war. After the war, the barracks were quickly razed and replaced by the usual suburban subdivisions.

    The only photographs we have ever seen from the WWII era are those you (?) had posted on the Oakville at War website (I wrote to them at least 2 years ago, but was given the run-around to someone who never replied). So my question is: Have you got photographs of the place -- my friend tells me that the shack with the No. 45 RAF sign was there in the 30s, according to old press photos; there were the usual barracks, mess halls, etc., we are told, but if he could put some of it in his book, it would be swell.

    Hope to hear from you.
    Don Pedro

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