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Thread: Plt Off Jack Bradley

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    Default Plt Off Jack Bradley

    Hi All

    The above was killed on 12 Jun 1933 whilst serving with No 14 Sqn in Palestine but I haven't been able to identify and aircraft.

    Does anyone know of the circumstances?

    All the best

    Malcolm

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    Malcolm

    Can't help with loss however he was a double bale-out !


    June 30 1931 as a Flight Cadet ar Cranwell - He baled out over Sleaford Lincs age 17. Landed in a field, had a cut face caused by wing of the plane.

    Note: Probably this incident: Flight August 7, 1931 Annual Report: Case of complete disregard of the Standing Orders relating to Flying. A pupil indulged in certain aerobatics which are strickly forbidden, which resulted in his aeroplane breaking up in the air, he being very fortunate to escape safely by parachute. The offending pupil in this case was rusticated (expelled temporarily) and sentenced to lose one term.

    If anyone can ID this aircraft I would love to know serial!

    He also was thrown out on 28 Apr 1933 of Fairey Gordon K2632 over Zerka, Transjordon. "LAC Reginald George Willmott missing and is believed to have lost his life in an accident near Zerka Transjordan to 14 Bomber Sqn in which he was a passenger. P/O Jack Bradley, another passenger who descended by parachute was slightly injured. P/O William John Howard Ekins, pilot of aircraft was not injured. ""Hit bump & two crew thrown out.""
    Note: LAC Reginald George Willmott is buried at Ramleh War Cemetery: 28.4.33 365528 LAC R H G Willmott, RAF, 14Sqn. Plot F Grave 21. For Bradley see June 30, 1931"

    I did not know he had died on 12 Jun 1933 whilst serving with No 14 Sqn in Palestine -but explains why I could not find any reference to him after this.. but thanks for back ground info!

    Paul

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    Hi Paul

    I am currently putting together a listing of pre-WW2 Flight Cadets and your info has given me even more background info.

    Your mention of being "rusticated (expelled temporarily)" possibly explains a number of other cadets who appear to graduation or who are awarded their commissions after the rest of their classmates.

    Malcolm

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    Malcolm

    Yes you can work out some of them as being in the next graduation class compare with class mates

    However, also happened if injured!

    I am 99.99% sure that Bradley is the Cadet mentioned in Flight, the year and circumstancs fit, he was also in the next graduation class and only Flight Cadet wjo I can find who bailed out in 1931

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    Hello,

    Here is the reason you can't identify the aircraft involved in the death of F/O James Bradley:

    Bradley, alas, did not long survive his good fortune (on 27th April 1933). Only six weeks later, on June 12, he was killed when a Morris six-wheeler carrying official mail from Amman to Ramleh overturned.

    See:
    Winged Promises:A History of No.14 Squadron, RAF 1915-1945.
    Orange,Vincent (Prof) & The Lord Deramore et al.
    Fairford:The RAF Benevolent Fund Enterprises,1996.
    p.75.

    Col.
    Last edited by COL BRUGGY; 3rd August 2012 at 12:42.

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    Many Thanks Col

    Malcolm

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    Col

    Can you please supply the bit before on his good fortune April 27th 1933 - It does not match the date I have and also I would like full details of his fall out

    Looks like he was formamly called James but everyone knew his as Jack

    Many thanks

    Paul

    He is Jack Bradley in London Gazette and Times of Saturday, Apr 29, 1933 London says 'yesterday'
    Last edited by paulmcmillan; 3rd August 2012 at 12:29.

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    Paul,

    "But several fatal accidents occurred on duty. for example, while approaching Zerqa* en route from Rutbah to Amman with service mail on 27th April 1933, a Gordon struck a very bad bump at 7,000 feet and both passengers were thrown out of the rear cockpit. Flying Officer James Bradley descended safely by parachute, but the wireless operator had not been wearing his parachute pack at the time and was killed."

    * Zerka in index.

    Col.
    Last edited by COL BRUGGY; 3rd August 2012 at 12:41.

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    Col thanks

    Date confusing. However, more inclined to believe 27th April 1933 now

    Western Morning News
    Sat 29 Apr 1933
    AIRMAN FEARED KILLED R.A.F
    PILOT'S ESCAPE BY PARACHUTE
    Air Ministry announced last night that No. ? Leading Aircraftman Reginald George Willmott is missing, and is believed to have lost his life as the result of an aircraft accident which occurred near Zerka, Transjordan, yesterday, to a Gordon aircraft of No. ? Bomber Squadron, Amman, in which he was being carried as a passenger. Pilot-Officer Jack Bradley, another passenger, who descended by parachute, was slightly injured. Pilot-Officer William John howard Ekins, pilot of the aircraft, was not injured"

    Says Last Night - Would eb announcemnt on 28th and if the announcement said yesterday = 27th

    Though I believe Willmotts grave says '28.4.33'

    http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=pv&GRid=88565155&PIpi=58560723
    Last edited by paulmcmillan; 3rd August 2012 at 13:04.

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    Bradley 30th June 1931 - Found this report today of the incident

    Parachutes Have Figured in Some Hairbreadth Escapes by Adventurers of the Air
    Evening Post (NZ), Volume CXXVII, Issue 88, 15 April 1939
    Mr David Master book "On the Wing"
    On June 30, 1931 Flight-Cadet Bradley, of the Royal Air Force, set out from the aerodrome at Cranwell, Lincolnshire, and at 16,000 feet he began to practise some aerial acrobatic feats that an Air Force pilot must master in order to engage an enemy. Switching off the engine, he put the machine down in a vertical dive, and soon found he was diving slightly on this back. He manipulated the elevator in an effort to get out of the dive, but could make no impression on the machine. He estimated that it was diving earthwards at 300 miles an hour. He tried to roll the machine over, in order to obtain control of it, and eventually this manoeuvre was successful. He found himself diving at a very steep angle in a forward direction. He began to manipulate the tail in order to get the machine out of her dive, and to his astonishment he saw the lower wings break off and follow downward in his wake. Glancing upward, he saw that the top wings had gone. He was diving earthwards in the fuselage, which began to revolve rapidly as it fell. He released himself from the safety belt which secured him to the seat in the cockpit, and tried to get out of the machine, but was pinned so tightly against the left side by centrifugal force that he could scarcely move. He put his elbows on the cockpit and levered himself up. He got over the side, but was held tightly against the outside of the cockpit. He forced himself away, and pulled the rip cord of his parachute, which opened with a loud crack and checked his descent.
    Naturally, he thought all danger was over provided he landed safely, but on glancing upwards he saw two of the detached wings of the aeroplane descending. If either of them hit his parachute, the damage would probably render it unable to support his weight, and he would strike the ground with such force as to be instantly killed. By clutching some of the cords of his parachute, he tried to close it partially on one side so as to alter its course and escape the falling wings, which were descending at a faster rate than the parachute. He saw one wing slide past him in a dive, and the other spin by slowly. He managed to reach the ground safely, after side-slipping the parachute away from a wood, where he might have been injured if caught by the branches of a tree.

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