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Thread: RCAF CM & OC Gongs/Awards, what are they?

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    Default RCAF CM & OC Gongs/Awards, what are they?

    Hello,

    I am researching Canadian J16149, Squadron Leader Derek Arnold INMAN, MiD (3), CM, OC., Born: 20 February 1910 - Comereroal, Yorkshire, England. Died: 10 July 1983 - West Vancouver, BC. Can someone please tell me what the 'CM' & 'OC' gongs are? I have played with LG, Google, Flight, Times, Rafweb but no success anywhere. I feel they may be unique to Canada. Thank you.

    Norman

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    Hi Norman

    OC=Order of Canada
    CM=Membre de l'ordre du Canada

    From Wiki
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Order_of_Canada

    Regards

    Pete

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    Take a look at http://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/collections/cmdp/mainmenu

    CM is probably the Centenial Medal, http://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/collections/cmdp/mainmenu/group10/ccm

    OC may be the Order of Canada, either Companion, Officer or Member, see http://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/collections/cmdp/mainmenu/group02/oc

    Both are awarded to either military or civilians, generally in recognition of long term service or some specific humanitarian accomplishment. My father recieved the CM apparently for having nearly 30 years service by 1967 (when they were awarded). He always said he was never quite sure why he got it.

    There is also a newer CM (Canada Medal) that appears to be a good behaviour/ long service kind of a thing. Don't know much about it.

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    Derek Arnold Inman, C.M.

    Vancouver, British Columbia

    Member of the Order of Canada

    Awarded on June 22, 1981; Invested on October 21, 1981

    Since retiring in 1975 from a business career he has devoted himself to the improvement of life in North and West Vancouver. His work has been with the Air Cadets and in commercial development, the arts, recreation and the welfare of youth and senior citizens. A park has been named for him in North Vancouver.

    Deceased on July 10, 1983

    Further to the above, the revised RCAF awards data base for him now reads as follows: additional information re his operational flying would be welcomed:

    INMAN, F/L Derek Arnold (J16149) - Mention in Despatches - No.24 OTU - Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 337/45 dated 23 February 1945. Born in Comereroal, Yorkshire, 20 February 1910. Educated in England; naval cadet on HMS Conway, 1925-1927; merchant seaman, two years with Cunard and thereafter an odd career as a Concert Artist Manager (eight years) and a special correspondent for newspapers. Home in Toronto. Enlisted in Montreal, 9 January 1941 and posted to No.1 Manning Depot. To No.1 ITS, 17 March 1941; graduated and promoted LAC, 28 April 1941 when posted to No.1 AOS; graduated 20 July 1941 when posted to No.1 BGS; graduated and promoted Sergeant, 30 August 1941 when posted to No.2 ANS. To Embarkation Depot, 30 September 1941; to RAF overseas, 19 October 1941. Posted from No.3 PRC to No.23 OTU, 16 December 1941. Appears to have been briefly attached to No.419 Squadron in April 1942. To No.57 Squadron, 2 May 1942. To No.23 OTU, 9 September 1942. Commissioned 16 October 1942. Promoted Flying Officer, 16 April 1943. Promoted Flight Lieutenant, 16 August 1943. To No.24 OTU, 15 March 1944. Promoted Squadron Leader, 25 May 1944. Attached to Night Training Unit, Warboys, 11-15 January 1945. Repatriated 13 August 1945. Retired 26 September 1945. Served as Education Officer with No.103 Air Cadet Squadron, 15 June 1952 to 30 July 1960; during this time he was an Honorary Aide-de-Camp to the Lieutenant-Governor, 12 October 1955 to 12 October 1960. Retired from business in 1977. Appointed Member, Order of Canada, 22 June 1981 for civic work including Air Cadets. Died in West Vancouver, 10 July 1983 as per British Columbia Vital Statistics.

    INMAN, S/L Derek Arnold (J16149) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1395/45 dated 31 August 1945.

    INMAN, S/L Derek Arnold (J16149) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 322/46 dated 29 March 1946.

    Notes: He appears to have flown 408 hours before being posted as a screened instructor to ground instructional duties.

    On repatriation to Canada he stated he had flown 21 sorties overseas (94 hours 25 minutes), the last with No.57 Squadron being 28 August 1942. He further described his non-operational flying overseas as 189 hours 25 minutes.

    Training: Course at No.1 ITS was 17 March to 22 April 1941. Courses and marks as follows: Mathematics (50/100), Armament, practical and oral (98/100), Signals (95/100), Drill (75/100), Law and Discipline (91/100). Placed fifth in a class of five Observers. “Recommended for commission. Considerably above average. Mature with sound judgement. Very enthusiastic, Very dependable and stable. Serious, hard working, clear-thinking airman. Considerable navigation experience.”

    Course att No.1 AOS was 28 May to 20 July 1941. Flew in Anson aircraft (34.10 as first navigator by day, 25.50 as second navigator by day, 6.40 first navigator by night, 9.35 as second navigator by night). “Average. 22nd out of 38. Fairly consistent in the air. Needs to gain confidence in his work.” Ground training in DR Plotting (102/150), DR and DF written tests (106/200), Compasses and Instruments (96/150), Signals (90/100), Maps and Charts (63/100), Meteorology (56/100), Photography (69/100), Reconnaissance (66/100). “Slightly below average. 36th out of 38 [ground school]. A good student in class. Slow and accurate. Fell down in the examinations...Inclined to worry about his work resulting in poor examination results. Would have been recommended for commission except for poor results. He should make a good officer and observer when he gains confidence.” (F/L E.R. Pounder, Chief Instructor).

    Course at No.1 BGS was 21 July to 1 September 1941. Flew in Battle aircraft (17.50 in bombing, 6.05 in gunnery). Tied for 36th place in a class of 46.

    Course at No.2 ANS was 1-28 September 1941. Flew 6.10 hours by day as first navigator, 6.00 by day as second navigator, 5.55 by night as first navigator, 12.55 by night as second navigator. Placed 9th in a class of 38 in air work. Ground courses in Astro Navigation (Plotting), marked 93/150, and Astro Navigation (Written), marked 97/100. Placed 20th in class (ground work).

    Assessments: On 19 October 1942 (before his commission had been gazetted), W/C J.A. Roncoroni, Training Wing, No.23 OTU wrote, “Flight Sergeant Inman was a pupil at this OTU and returned here two months ago, having completed an operational tour. He is an exceptional navigator and a very capable instructor. He possesses powers of leadership and can control subordinates well. It is thought that Flight Sergeant Inman will make a first-class officer, and he is strongly recommended for a commission.”

    On 20 July 1944 W/C C.S.P. Russell, No.24 OTU, wrote, “This officer is very much above the average in initiative and drive. He works hard and shows great keenness in all he does.” To this, G/C G.V. Lane added, “He takes the greatest possible interest in all forms of station life. Can be relied upon to complete the most difficult tasks. A most loyal and trustworthy officer.”

    On 24 February 1945, W/C H.H.J. Miller wrote, “Is quite outstanding. He has colossal initiative and drive which he uses to good advantage both in and out of his own particular section.” To this, G/C G.V. Lane added, “I fully concur. He has done a tremendous amount of work. The bigger the task the better he does it. He is outstanding in every way.”

    On 23 July 1945, G/C G.V. Lane wrote, “The most energetic and competent officer I have ever served with. He is absolutely outstanding.”
    Last edited by HughAHalliday; 31st August 2012 at 20:37.

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    Hello,

    17-18 May 1942
    No.57 Sqn.
    Wellington IC DV806:DX-
    Op: Boulogne

    T/o 2245 Feltwell. Ditched, due to failure of the port engine, 200 yards off Dungeness, Kent. No injuries reported.

    37654 S/L (Pilot) John Stuart LAIRD RAFO
    - ? - Sgt ( Nav.) Derek Arnold INMAN RCAF
    110585 P/O ( - ? - ) John Patrick LEESON RAFVR
    1161688 Sgt (W.Op./Air Gnr.) Raymond Hill MOSES RAFVR (+27-7-1942 No.57 Sqn. BCL3/162)
    - ? - Sgt (Air Gnr.) - ? - BLACKBERRIE*

    * The name 'BLACKBERRIE' cannot be confirmed due to extremely poor microfilm reproduction from the original paper records**.

    See: BCL3/94

    ** Possibly; 1203414 Sgt (Air Gnr.) Sidney Francis Ogeley BLACKMORE RAFVR +24-7-1942. No.57 Sqn. BCL3/155).

    Col.
    Last edited by COL BRUGGY; 1st September 2012 at 00:33.

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    Thank you all very much for the comprehensive information you have so kindly provided. I am most grateful.

    Through your kind responses, Derek Inman has been the fastest airman I've ever researched. It has also provided me with a clue to help complete the research of another Canadian I am researching.

    Thanks again
    Norman
    Last edited by namrondooh; 2nd September 2012 at 09:00.

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