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Thread: Weather conditions over England April 28/29th 1943

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    Default Weather conditions over England April 28/29th 1943

    Gents,

    Looking for details on weather condions over East Anglia on the above date, also over Denmark.

    Any pointers or help most welcome.

    Regards

    Steve
    No.218 (Gold Coast) Squadron Association Historian
    No.623 squadron Research

    ~~IN TIME ~~

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    Steve, Hi,
    Met Team on the case!
    Rgds
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Hello Steve

    Apart from nearby Station ORBs (which are usually not detailed enough) and ORBs of the Coastal Groups (usually in the Appendices) or the Diary in AIR 15 (around AIR 15/906) sometimes has references to the Weather. Balloon Squadrons, Balloon Groups (especially wind / lightning references) and Coastal Command Station/Group ORBs usually have brief weather Reports.

    The Met Office is the official 'place of deposit' for the Royal Air Force Weather Log Books. Your best bet is to try emailing the Met Office Archives, they were (and I hope still are) one of the most helpful archives for researchers who need the RECORDED WEATHER REPORT, as they are too far away for most people to visit, now they are based in the South-west.

    However they are very expensive for the Weather forecasts, but you want the recorded Weather Report (one offs of the Log book were usually FOC by email).

    For a single day enquiry only, they promptly emailed me the detailed weather report page (as a readable photograph) recorded in the nearest RAF Weather Station Log Book (which they hold for all RAF Stations which were in the Air Ministry Weather gathering reporting set-up). They sent me a sheet (which I already had) of the codes used in the book. Thus will give you all type of weather, wind and cloud type info., including cloud base height.

    As well as holding RAF and some Naval, Reporting Station Logs (taken every few hours), they should hold the Air Ministry Weather Log taken several times (either 4 times or twice) daily.

    For Europe they usually have the Charts which indicate isobars and which also had wind speed / direction indicated as symbols and arrows. I have a Pilots Flying book somewhere which explains these.

    I think you will get the help you need if you send them a nice email, the Archives chap who helped me initially, had exactly the same name as an ex-BBC Weather presenter.

    All the best.

    Mark
    Last edited by Mark Hood; 30th September 2012 at 14:06.

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    Heligoland Bight
    Variable convection cloud, base 2000 ft but 800 ft in occassional showers. Some slight static. Good visibility.

    Western Baltic
    Mainly layer cloud 3-6/10ths base 2/3000 ft, but 6-10/10ths convection cloud with showers and cloud base down to 600-1000 ft at times in the extreme south. Good visibility

    Eastern Baltic
    Fine. Moderate visibility but belt of heavy convection cloud, base 2/3000 ft at about 17 degrees E. with icing in cloud at 5000 ft

    Route
    3-7/10ths convection cloud, base 1/2000 ft with slight showers across North Sea to 5 degrees E. Thence to Danish coast convection cloud increasing to 8-10/10ths with heavier showers and much static, base of cloud falling to 300 ft at times. Across Denmark, small amounts of layer cloud at 3000 ft.

    Winds
    North Sea 300 degrees 20 mph at 1000 ft
    Demark 290/300 degrees 30mph at 8000 ft
    Baltic 300 degrees 20/25 mph at 1000 ft

    AIR 14/3373

    Ross
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  5. #5
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    Gents,

    Thank you all, bang on the money !!

    Regards

    Steve
    No.218 (Gold Coast) Squadron Association Historian
    No.623 squadron Research

    ~~IN TIME ~~

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    Hi All,
    The Met Team - by looking at the probable charts for the days in question - had come to very much the same aftercast as was reported. The main differences were that we would have gone for occasional moderate turbulence in addition to the icing. The term "static" is probably analogous to QRN - but may, on this occasion, have been actual cloud-to-cloud lightning discharges! - and these beasties really DO like trailing aerials!!!
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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