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Thread: The misterious Wellington in Alghero airport

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    Default The misterious Wellington in Alghero airport

    I found a photograph taken at Alghero (Sardinia) airport in 1953 with a written-off Vickers Wellington. The author explains that the plane had been left by RAF during the WWII, but he's afraid it was a sort of "metropolitan legend". On the fuselage appears a H letter just besides the classic round RAF logo and a dark vertical band.
    I am an historian and I discovered that only two Wellington squadrons operated in Alghero in 1944: RAF 36 Sqdn and RAAF 458 Sqdn.
    So is there anybody who can help me to identify that aircraft, its squadron and possibly the reasons why it was still at Alghero 9 years after the war end? Thank you!

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    How about it being a postwar RAF training aircraft? Does the photo show wartime camouflage and black or silver overall? What is the style of the roundel - red white and blue with a large white band (postwar) or yellow red white and blue with thin white and yellow bands (wartime)?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Graham Boak View Post
    How about it being a postwar RAF training aircraft? Does the photo show wartime camouflage and black or silver overall? What is the style of the roundel - red white and blue with a large white band (postwar) or yellow red white and blue with thin white and yellow bands (wartime)?
    I can't post the photo, that furthermore is in b/w and not so clear. I can see only the left side of the aircraft: behind the left wing there is a H that almost touches (or probably does) the roundel; then a large vertical dark band, large almost as much as the roundel, that probably runs all around the aircraft. On the base of the tail , in the center, there's a flag.
    There's also a horizontal dark band along the upper part of the fuselage that starts (probably) under the cockpit and ends at the end of the wing. It looks like the coloured strip that we can see in many civil aircrafts on the line of windows. And actually I can see a couple of clear dots that can be windows.
    The author says no weapons on board.
    As for the roundel, it is impossible to distinguish if a yellow circle exists.

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    Can you post the image to a flickr account so that we can see it, or some photo hosting site.

    And there is no need to use the quote function!!!!! Only three messages in and the text is just above what your posting.

    http://www.rafcommands.com/forum/showthread.php?9289-Use-of-Quote-Function
    Last edited by dennis_burke; 8th November 2012 at 09:33.
    Dennis Burke
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    Foreign Aircrew and Aircraft Ireland 1939-1945
    www.ww2irishaviation.com

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    If the photograph was taken on orthochromatic film, then the dark band is possibly the Yellow band of a trainer. The description does make it sound like the a postwar aircraft in Aluminium overall. You don't say whether the roundel has the equal-sized colours of postwar or the narrow white band of wartime. The same should apply to the finflash. You use the term "flag" but I assume you mean a tricolour finflash rather than the full national Union flag.

    The description sounds almost like an RAF Transport Command aircraft: this would have white top, blue stripe, Aluminium underneath, and carry a single code letter forward of the roundel. However they wouldn't have been using Wellingtons that late. Valettas, maybe. I'd expect a trainer to be overall Aluminium without the blue stripe, with a Yellow band and displaying more code letters. There was however some variation.

    It should be possible to identify any postwar Wellington abandoned at Alghiero, perhaps a navigational trainer that went sick? However I don't have access to my serial books at the moment, and there are a lot of Wellingtons to have to go through!

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    https://plus.google.com/photos/104791334365432221511/albums/5808405905463880673/5808405922689586786

    I hope this can be viewed. Sorry for the use of reply with quote

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    That link is not working but you may just need to paste a different link, I'm sure it will work soon.
    Dennis Burke
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    Foreign Aircrew and Aircraft Ireland 1939-1945
    www.ww2irishaviation.com

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    https: means that this is the secure link ie needs log in.

    You need to give the http: address that can be viewed by anyone

    Ross
    The Intellectual Property contained in this message has been assigned specifically to this web site.
    Copyright Ross McNeill 2015/2018 - All rights reserved.

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    http://www.facebook.com/groups/44083854854/ ???

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    OK, it probably isn't a nav trainer. Sorry to raise the awkward possibility that it could actually be a French aircraft. It seems to have the maritime scheme of white overall but for Extra Dark Sea Grey on the purely planview uppersurfaces.

    An RAF Coastal Command aircraft would be in the same scheme - and indeed left over from WW2 but I'm not sure which units operated these in the Med. That dark band is unlikely on such an example, and I'd expect unit code letters too.

    The tonal effect of the roundel colours could be argued either way.

    Edit. Postwar Aeronavale would be silver overall with anchors on the roundels, rudder stripes and unit codes. So maybe not such a bright idea.
    Last edited by Graham Boak; 8th November 2012 at 14:51.

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