Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Short Sunderland

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Near Graveley Cambs
    Posts
    295
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default Short Sunderland

    Can anyone let me know the make up of the crew (originally 7 and later 11) of the Sunderland.
    i.e. Pilot, co-pilot, navigator, wireless operator, flight engineer,?? ????

    TIA
    Paul H.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Stockholm
    Posts
    1,049
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 10 Times in 9 Posts

    Default

    Paul,

    According to wikipedia, and citing Jane's Fight Aircraft of WWII:

    Crew: 911 (two pilots, radio operator, navigator, engineer, bomb-aimer, three to five gunners)

    Regards,

    Dave

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Prague, Czech Republic
    Posts
    3,512
    Thanks
    20
    Thanked 14 Times in 13 Posts

    Default

    Hi Paul, it depends the era you are interested in.
    For example in the 50s over Malaya and Korea the standard crew was 2 pilots, navigator, 2 flight engineers, 3 signalers, 2 air gunners.
    Sometimes when on long patrol the number of pilots was increased from 2 to 3 and 2 navigators instead of only one.

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Berkshire
    Posts
    2,210
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Hi Paul
    If we can extrapolate backwards from the post-war Shackleton we might find that the w/op and gunner positions were interchangeable and therefore the personnel would have been multi-qualified. the duties on board would have included preparing food for the crew and visual lookout and ,in later Sunderlands, radar operating. There is a good chance that the crew would have rotated regularly to ensure freshness and alertness for as long as possible with periods of rest. The bomb aimer was probably a 2nd Nav with one Nav for en-route and the 2nd for tactical purposes at an incident and around a convoy. It would have been very common that the pilot would have aimed the weapons visually in an attack that came up at short notice and low level, common against submarines and for which the bomb switching would have been set up. Unlike Bomber Command , Coastal was not as exposed to continuous enemy interference. The absence of a specialist at a given position would not have been as critical although Bombers did stay airborne as long as Coastal Command on some missions Bomber ops were often of shorter duration.
    Regards
    Dick

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Near Graveley Cambs
    Posts
    295
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Thanks Dick,Dave and Pavel. It is the 1948/49 period in Korea I'm looking at so all your help has been invaluable.
    Paul H

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    121
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default Not Korea but...

    my cousins Sunderland in 1944 had the following as listed on the Crash Report.
    Captain, 1st Pilot, 2nd Pilot, Naviagtor, F/Engineer, FME/AG, WOP/Air, A. Gnr, W/Op air, F/Eng, A.G. W/op.Air.

    I have taken the abreviations as written on the report there were 12 on board - 3 pilots, one Navigator, 2 Flight Engineers, after that it is a mixture of W/Op and Air Gunners. Might help seems the mix was about the same when the crew rotated.

    Regards
    Dyan

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •