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Thread: Acronym Help Please

  1. #1
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    Default Acronym Help Please

    Could anyone please explain the acronym in the following: "he was recommended for appointment to commissioned rank ACSD (Fighter Controller)" [Appears in the 1944 Service Record of a RDF Op.]

    Also, when someone was "attached to NN Wing" for a short period of time, does this mean they were physically posted to the Wing HQ?

    Any help would be much appreciated

    Regards

    Pete
    Last edited by PeteT; 8th December 2012 at 14:22. Reason: Additional Question
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

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    Pete, Hi,
    Don’t know about the acronym (tried a number of permutations - Air, Control, Special, Duties - but none seemed to fit).

    Let it be supposed you were physically Posted to Station A. Your Personal Docs would eventually arrive at Station A (if you hadn’t already carried them with you in a sealed envelope from your previous Station!). Station A would be responsible for feeding, paying, housing, clothing, and generally looking after you. If it was decided that you needed to be Detached to Station B for a short period of time (on a Course, or to bump up Station B’s staff during an Exercise, etc, etc,) then you would physically travel to Station B – on Attachment. Station B would feed, house, look after you, BUT your main Admin Docs, etc, would remain at Station A until such time as you were Posted (permanently) to a new Station. Those of us - in the early 50's - who were the extra support at the various Stations in 11 Grp for Ex FABULOUS (what would later be known as the QRA commitment) were almost permanently on Detachment. I did one period of a month where I was at 4 different Detached Stations before returning to my Permanent Station. This had advantages in that Station Warrant Officers couldn't nail you for Parades or Fatigues. The disadvantage was that you normally lived in Transit Accommodation - and some were bl%%dy dire!!!
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Thanks Peter; an excellent explanation of attachment. What I would like to establish is the physical location of someone when they were "@ 71 Wing"; would it have been the actual headquarters of the particular wing?

    Regards

    Pete
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

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    Pete,
    Not necessarily. If 71 Wg had bleated to Grp (or wherever) that they needed another Spanner Bender for a month. Then said Spanner Bender would be Attached to 71 Wg (Detached from wherever). How 71 Wg used the bloke - and where - was up to 71 Wg. Might have been at 71 Wg HQ, but - equally - might have been at a Sqn (or several!) in that Wng!
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Thanks again Peter; much appreciated.

    ... and now .... back to trying to solve the acronym

    Regards

    Pete
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

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    Hi Pete

    I suggest it should be A&SD not ACSD which would make it Admin & Special Duties Branch, this was the most likely branch for a fighter controller to commissined into at that time

    Malcolm

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    Per Malcolm suggestion above, whats the mans name and was he commishioned, under what branch does his name appear in LG in that case.
    Dennis Burke
    - Dublin

    Foreign Aircrew and Aircraft Ireland 1939-1945
    www.ww2irishaviation.com

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    Thanks for the responses.

    Whilst he was recommended for commission I can't find anything in the London Gazette and there is nothing on his service record that relates to a commission (other than the recommendation).

    I will pass on the information obtained to the family, who may wish to investigate further.

    Thanks again for your help on this one.

    Regards

    Pete
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

  9. #9
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    As a follow-up, if someone was recommended for a commission in 1944:

    - who would make the recommendation?
    - who was responsible for actioning that recommendation?
    - what procedure would they have to go through?

    Any help to improve my understanding on this subject would be brilliant.

    Regards

    Pete
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

  10. #10
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    Recommendations for commissions were generally the prerogative of the unit's commanding officer. It was one of his duties to keep watch over his commissioned and, to a lesser extent, non-commissioned personnel and try and spot likely candiates for commissioning; he was to specifically observe behavious for "officer-like qualities" and if possible, command potential (although not necessarilly higher command!) The King's Regulations and Air Council Instructions have plenty of splendid advice on this aspect of the duties of all RAF officers, and specifically commanding officers. However EVERY officer no matter how junior, was advised to keep a look out for non-commissioned personnel (and particularly NCOs, but also other instances form even lower rank or classification) and advise his CO of any particularly promising specimans. However during WW2 it seemed to be the practice for NCO aircrew to badger their CO for a commission; some were continually knocked back, others were recommended fairly readily. This did not usually happen in peacetime to best of my knowledge, it seemed that you had to always assume your character, sense of duty, initiative and general ambition was under surveilance at all times and hope you brought yourself to a unit officers' notice! Of course the Air Ministry would have had the final say when it came to appointments to commissions, but the CO's recommendation was the first and most important stage, but might also depend on the number of new commissions required at any given time in the individual branches of the RAF to maintain the perceived correct balance of officers to "other airmen".
    David D

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