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Thread: Responding to previous searches on the loss of Sgt VG Wilson in December 1943

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    Default Responding to previous searches on the loss of Sgt VG Wilson in December 1943

    Hello,
    I did a search on my uncle (Pilot Sergeant Victor Wilson) last night and the search result intruigingly threw up this page:
    www.rafcommands.com/dcforum/DCForumID6/Data/9559.txt

    I couldn't access anything else and so registered with this site in an attempt to find out more about why people were making the enquiries as I have a little more info (and wonder if there is anything else).

    Having dug a little deeper I haven't been able to find out anything more or make contact with the researchers, as I believe the bulletin board on which the posts were made has been archived, hence the message format. If the original researchers would like to make contact, I'd be very happy!

    Paul

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    Hello

    The best is to follow the URL then copy and paste the text into word, then edit it. Problem comes from the punctuation, , : ( ) ' / and else. Then you can read the original thread properly.

    As you say, the original posters might contact you, or you can check their contact details in the "community" bar above.

    There is a mention of a picture of the crashed plane, which was an Airspeed Oxford.

    Good luck

    Joss

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    Hello, I believe it was me who made the initial enquiry

    Your uncle Vic Wilson was friendly with my parents during the war. I have a couple of photographs of Vic, one taken on his wedding day when he married Shirley. If you wish to have a copy of these photographs let me know and I would also be interested in what information you have.

    Regards, David.
    Researching my father's time with 50 Squadron, 97 Squadron, Dulug Luft, Stalag Luft VI, Stalag 357 and Stalag Luft III.

    http://wallyswar.wordpress.com/

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    Hi David,
    thanks for owning up!

    The Internet is a wonderful thing isn't it?

    Well, some years ago I was living in Aberdeen, having just left the RAF myself - so I have great interest in these things. One evening on the local Grampian news there was a piece about a memorial being placed in Aboyne (I think) to remember the hundreds(!) of aircrew who were lost on training missions in the Scottish Mountains during the war.

    At that point, the only information I had about my Uncle was from my Dad who was 8 when Victor died. As far as the family new, he had crashed into a mountain in Scotland. I don't think anybody looked into it any further - I suppose it wouldn't have been very easy in any case.

    So I did some research and discovered that he had been based at RAF Montrose, which was just an hour's drive away. I managed to get in touch with one of the museum trustees who said he would do a little digging for me. He called a few days later and invited me to visit. So I did, and discovered a great little museum with some of the original nissen huts well preserved, containing memorabilia from the war years. The very helpful person in the museum had found the original accident log and had it open on the page with the simple entry along the lines of 'aircraft missing at 1900hrs, search party sent out and discovered crashed aircraft 2300hrs at Broomhill. Two dead airman found beneath aircraft'.

    This was a revelation, and especially seeing my Uncle's name and the circumstances of the accident. I then looked up the hill on the map and drove up there. It's probably a couple of miles from the runway and from what I could deduce, Victor and his colleague were completing a circuit and were heading back out to sea before heading South in order to make the final approach. For whatever reason - perhaps they were blown slightly off course because the weather conditions on that evening weren't particularly good - they were either too low or off track as they clipped the top of the hill. Either they were supposed to be flying around it or over the top of it. The brief crash report describes the aircraft upside down at the top of the hill. When I found the hill, it was easy to visualise the accident as it was the highest point in the area. If they had been 10 or so feet higher they would have probably been OK.

    It just shows how challenging it was in those days without any of the modern instrumentation we have today. I'm sure this wasn't an uncommon event.

    Incidentally, my Dad is still alive and well. On his next visit to Aberdeen we went back to Montrose and he saw it all for himself. It was a fascinating experience, obviously with a heavy dose of sadness.

    Dad has one very striking photo of Victor in his number One's, which I would be happy to send to you. I'm sure he would be very grateful to see the photos you have.

    Paul

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