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Thread: Donald Scratch, RCAF

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    Default Donald Scratch, RCAF

    Hello All,

    This is a rather unusual request (aimed, specifically, at our Canadian experts!).

    Donald Scratch was, reputedly, born in Canada on 7 Jul 1919. He, reputedly, Enlisted in the RCAF (R60973) on 20 Jul 1940, and became a Pilot.

    I have just come into possession of an online document (unfortunately Author/Publisher not named – but with pix) outlining some of his, alleged, airmanship and/or low-flying skills. Almost unbelievable! So, before we go any further, (a) is(was) this man real?, (b) did he do what this doc says he did?, and (c) and if he did then he must be in RCAF folklore.

    Can QSP the doc to those interested, if they need it (or just QSP the bits about Scratch). No hurry, slow time will do. As far as I am aware it ain’t (yet) the First of April!

    TIA
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Of course he was real, Peter:

    http://www.rafcommands.com/forum/showthread.php?1284-Help-Needed-in-Seattle&p=6736#post6736

    http://warbirdinformationexchange.org/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=20763

    I also obtained his service file on my last trip to Ottawa if you need anything specific bio wise.

    He was in the RCAF before.

    Regards,

    Dave

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    Thanks, Dave, appreciate yr help (hope 'wing' OK?)

    This is the script attached to a very blurry pic of Scratch 'doing his thing'! Note it does mention Seattle - but I would have thought that at that time there would have been few night-time departures from Seattle?

    The strange end of Donald Scratch. Not an extreme low level shot, but this image of a P-40 chasing a B-25 Mitchell over buildings in the Vancouver area is worth a lengthy explanation. Jack Cook of the Warbird Information Exchange describes the background and the event pictured here: "Sgt. Scratch was born in Saskatchewan, July 7, 1919, and enlisted in the RCAF in Edmonton, as R60973 AC2 on July 20, 1940.
    He earned his wings as a Sergeant Pilot and flew with that rank for a long time. He flew Liberators from Gander, Newfoundland, as a copilot on antisubmarine patrols. Scratch was good at his job and was eventually raised to commissioned rank. As a Flying Officer and with many hours to his credit, Scratch wanted to fly as aircraft commander however RCAF officials considered that, as he was slight in build, and had suffered ankle injuries in the past, he would not have the strength to control a Liberator in an emergency. Sgt. Scratch wanted more action but was unsuccessful in getting an overseas posting. He became very depressed. One evening, June 19, 1944, in the mess, he entered into a debate about one man being able to take off, fly, and land, a Liberator. Scratch left the mess, went down to the hangar, fired up a Liberator, and took off. He shot up the American base at Argentia, and the base at Gander. When some fighters approached him to order him to land, they found him occupying, and rotating the mid-upper gun turret, with the aircraft on autopilot. The guns were fully armed and operational. When he returned to base he was placed under arrest, later court marshalled, and dishonorably discharged. Mr. Scratch returned to Edmonton, Alberta, and went directly to the RCAF recruiting office where he was accepted back into the RCAF as a Sergeant Pilot. He was posted to No. 5 OTU, Boundary Bay. No. 5 OTU was training aircrew on Liberators for service against Japan. The British Commonwealth Air Training Plan was winding down and many of the pilots were senior aircrew from Training Command. Again Sgt. Scratch found himself flying second pilot to officers with far less experience than himself. The training started on B-25 Mitchell aircraft and advanced to Liberators. When his experience and flying skills were not recognized, Sgt. Scratch again became frustrated. On December 5, 1944, Sgt. Scratch attempted to take off, unauthorized, in a Liberator. Due to the fact that there was no official flying that night, the field was in darkness and the control tower unmanned, Scratch mistook a roadway for the runway and crashed into a wooden bridge wiping out the undercarriage. Undaunted, he returned to the hangar and signed out a B-25 Mitchell and took off. Scratch flew down to Seattle, Washington, area and beat up the Seattle airport causing many aborted take offs. The Americans sent up fighter aircraft to bring the Mitchell down however, Scratch returned to Canada, disrupting and grounding flights at the Vancouver airport. He then flew around the Hotel Vancouver, well below the roof level and down Granville Street.
    The following is an eye witness report by Norman Green. 7:00 hrs. December 6, 1944, while it was still dark, I was in the mess hall when it was shaken, and dishes fell to the floor as a result of an aeroplane flying low overhead. The same pass shook WDs out of their bunks. As usual that morning at 8:00 hrs., 1200 airmen and airwomen, all ranks (I among them), formed up on the tarmac in front of the control tower for COs inspection. Just as the parade was about to be called to attention a B-25 Mitchell bomber came across the field at zero altitude, and pulled up sharply in a steep climb over the heads of the assembled airmen, just clearing the tower. Within seconds, 1,200 men and women were flat on the ground. The Mitchell then made several 25 ft. passes over the field. Group Captain Bradshaw dismissed the parade and ordered everyone to quarters. Over the next two hours we witnessed an almost unbelievable demonstration of flying, much of it with the B-25s wings vertical to the ground, below roof top level, defying gravity. We were continually diving into ditches to avoid being hit by a wingtip coming down a station road. He flew it straight and level, vertically with the wing tip only six feet above the ground without losing altitude, defying all logic, and the law of physics. After an hour of this, three P-40 Kittyhawks from Pat Bay Station arrived on the scene, fully armed, with orders to shoot the B-25 down if it left the area of the station. They tried to get on his tail but could not stay with him in his tight turns below rooftop level. After two hours of this, Sgt. Scratch flew over a corner of the field and circled one spot vertically, with the Kittyhawks joining in like may pole dancers. Sgt Scratch then climbed to 2,000 feet and wagged his wings as he crossed the field, boxed in by the fighters. When they were clear of the station, the Kittyhawks signaled Sgt. Scratch to land. He nodded his head, gave them the thumbs down sign, rolled over, pulled back on his controls, and, aiming at an uninhabited spot on Tillbury Island in the Fraser River, dived into it. The shattered red taillight lens was later located dead center between the points of impact of the engines. All in all, a remarkable story, but further on in the forum where this account was published, someone named JDK put into worked very eloquently what my thoughts were about this psychopath: I've always rather liked the saying that 'the superior pilot is one who uses his superior judgment to avoid using his superior skill.' Unless there's bits we don't know, Sgt Scratch was a disgrace with a few remarkable skills. As a military airman, wrecking several aircraft (and worse) simply because he wanted to do another job than allocated in wartime was utterly selfish and shortsighted. Flying skill to the extent of suicide while wasting government equipment and hazarding the lives of your fellow airmen hardly sounds like 'a superb pilot' to me. Makes a good bar tale though. And his ghost walks the corridors to this day..

    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    For a brief history of some of the government property Mr. Scratch destroyed in his brief career, take a look at my web pages for Bolingbroke 9064, Liberator EW282, and Mitchell HD343.

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    More here as well: http://www.flyingforyourlife.com/miscellaneous/scratch/
    He even looks the part in the photo.
    Dave Wallace

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    The following notes, though rather disjointed, are all drawn from official sources - his service file and various accident reports. In spite of other statements, I have found no evidence that Scratch flew to Seattle. On the contrary, it would appear that the RCAF P-40 pilots who pursued him had orders to shoot him down if he crossed into American territory, but otherwise only to keep the Mitchell under observation.

    Donald Palmer Whitman SCRATCH

    Earlier Scratch crash was 16 March 1942 in Bolingbroke 9064, No.119 Squadron, when he was seriously injured. NOTE: In his career he was first an NCO (R70052), then an officer (J26269) and then an NCO (R60973).

    PAC microfilm C-5938 - RCAF HQ File 1300-HD342-1 "Accident to Mitchell Aircraft R.A.F. No. HD343 at Boundary Bay, B.C. on 6-12-44. Sgt Don Palmer Scratch Killed.

    NOK was Mrs. M/M. Whitman, Ashmont, Alberta. His number was R60973.

    At 0815 hours 6 December Liberator EW282 was found damaged in a ditch east of No.25 Runway. A rum bottle found with a fingerprint from Scratch. No evidence of a second party. “Taxied off tarmac into mud becoming lodged partially in ditch and partially on hard surface road. All propellers struck road, 1 and 3 so violently as to fracture the reduction gear housing causing the propellers to leave the aircraft; nose wheel oleo leg sheared off and wheel collapsed backwards bring [bringing] aircraft belly down on roadway.


    Court of Inquiry was composed of S/L E.C. Cox (WAC HQ), S/L L.G.C. D'Easum (No.6 Regional Medical Board) and F/L J.M. McQuarrie (AIB, WAC). Unit was No.5 OTU, Boundary Bay.

    On 7 December 1944, G/C. F.S. Wilkins (Chief Investigator, Accidents) wrote a memo to the Minister and CAS.

    This accident concerns a most extraordinary episode, the newspapers describing it with the heading "Flier Runs Amok in Large Plane". After carrying out an unauthorized taxying in a Liberator and taxiing off the tarmac into mud at his unit, Sergeant Scratch took off without authority and while not on duty, in a Mitchell. For five hours and 15 minutes this pilot carried out dangerous low flying and ended up by diving into the ground.

    The above is all the word we have received officially from the unit but the press report as contained in the morning paper gave the following information.

    Lives of civilians and servicemen were endangered as the Mitchell dived and performed seemingly impossible manoeuvres before finally plunging to the earth. The plane missed persons, buildings and parked aircraft by inches. An attempt was made to drive the pilot down to an aerodrome by using fighter planes but pilots were instructed not to fire on him. He paid no attention to their efforts and continued his wild aerobatics.

    Sergeant Scratch was formerly an Officer with the rank of Pilot Officer and while stationed at Gander was court-martialled for flying a Liberator aircraft at an altitude of less than 1000 feet above ground level, which was not authorized. The accused pleaded guilty. On his trial he stated that he had become dissatisfied after three years Operational flying on the east coast and was determined to participate in another theatre of war. His sentence on court martial was dismissal from His Majesty's Service. Apparently he was allowed to re-enlist in the R.C.A.F. with the rank of Sergeant.

    On the above, opposite the last paragraph, is a minute from "RH" (?) to AMP, "Now that we have more than enough pilots I hope the policy of 'once out stay out' in these cases will prevail.”

    * * * * *

    Mitchell crashed at 1010 hours, 4.5 miles north of base. At takeoff, ceiling was 3,500 feet, visibility 20 miles, wind WSW at eight miles per hour. By time of crash it was ceiling unlimited, visibility 20 miles, winds four m.p.h.

    The court was unable to find his log, but concluded from other evidence that he had about 1,000 hours - 700 solo, 300 dual - on various types.

    He joined the RCAF 18 July 1940. On 16 March 1942 he was seriously injured in a Bolingbroke (both ankles crushed, hospitalized for six months). Commissioned 24 March 1943. Promoted Flying Officer, 24 September 1943. His CO in No.119 Squadron had described him as a "capable, industrious pilot, shows high degree of energy and initiative in performance of his duties". (June 1st, 1942, recommending him for commission). Later flew with No.10 (BR) but never attained captain's proficiency.

    Medical Report, 27 March 1942, Sidney Military Hospital (to which he had been admitted on 19 March 1942 - discharged on 27 March 1942 to D.P. & N.H., Halifax - not sure what these letters signify).

    The patient was injured in an aeroplane crash on Monday, March 16/42. He was taken to the Sydney City Hospital (Civilian). Dr. T.R. Meech, the D.P. and N.H. surgeon from North Sydney and the RCAF Medical Officer attempted a reduction of a bilateral fracture dislocation of the tali. The patient had also suffered extensive burns from high test gasoline. See X-Ray films, March 16 and 18/42. The Officer in charge surgery S.M.H.I. (B.W. Stevens) was asked to see this patient on Wednesday, March 18.42.

    Examination 1700 hours, March 18/42. Both legs and feet were encased in plaster from the heads of the metatarsals to below the knee. The toes were dusky, swollen and markedly flexed, any attempt to extend the toes caused severe pain. X-Ray films showed that the fracture dislocations were unchanged by manipulation. There was an extensive first and second degree burn on the boack [sic, back ?] from the angles of the scapula down both buttocks, the perineum and the right arm. There were many large blisters present. Diagnoses - 1. Bilateral fracture and dislocation of the tali 2. 2nd degree gasoline burn.

    The RCAF M.O. was immediately called and it was recommended that the case be split and a plantar splint to support the toes be supplied. This was agreed upon and the vast was split and pried open and plantar splits added to support the toes. Full extension of the toes could not be obtained. It was advised that an open operation be performed to effect a reduction of the fracture, dislocation since the swelling and contracture of the toes could not be improved until this was effected. It was further pointed out that since a dislocated talus very often lives it was worth while effecting a reduction leaving astragolectomy as a subsequent treatment in the event of aseptic necrosis of the talus (Major B.W. Stevens)

    Medical Report, 11 September 1942 (F/L E.D. Donaldson, Camp Hill Hospital, Halifax) - This man was admitted for examination and it was recommended that with special supports he should be able to fly in 2-3 weeks.”

    A Medical Report which bears date 24 August 1944 (i.e. after court martial and before formal dismissal) but may have been earlier (signed by Scratch and F/L H. Bright (not sure of initials) has the following statement by him:

    I have been bothered almost continuously with my ankles and feet since they were injured in an aircraft crash at Sydney, N.S., 16th March 1942, while in the line of duty, namely, an operational patrol. I have resumed flying duties and find that my feet are strong enough to operate the controls properly. Continued weight on them such as working or standing necessitates a rest period because of pain brought on by these actions. I am unable to run, and have difficulty descending stairs. This is due to the stiffness that is apparent in both, but more marked in the right ankle. This disability would seem to me to be a permanent one. All of my movements are hindered by my feet which give me pain and discomfort except when sitting or lying down and as a result I am unable to do manual labour. Weather also bothers them and cold and dampness likewise causes them to ache.

    A report prepared 25 August 1944 (i.e. after court martial but before final dismissal); prepared by Eastern Air Command psychiatrist (name illegible on form). After outlining previous career it stated:

    Crashed and severely injured March 16.41. Posted to Gander June/43. Assumed pilot duties 10 B.R. September 1943. Thousands hours, no other crashes or particular flying stress. Present situation appears to have began immediately following his crash. He had severe injuries to both ankles and was laid up in bed for a considerable time. During this period he had repeated nightmares of horrible flying situations, in which things got out of control and just as he was about to have a serious accident he would awaken. He was usually trembling during the time with perspiration, tense with fright. He was able to go back to sleep after a while. The situation continued for about a year. Three months later be was posted to Gander, put on flying duties, six months after recovery. For a long period he was second pilot of an aircraft. Began to feel that his ankles would prevent him from ever being a captain. Worried about it a great deal and there was considerable evidence that his future as a pilot occupied much of his thought. He finally flew a Liberator alone, was Court Marshalled [sic] and dismissed from the service. He was under arrest for a period of some two months before the Court Marshall and about a month afterwards. He tells during this interval he spent a great deal of time thinking what a fool he had made of himself. Very concerned about his present military status. Annoyed, because of the reputation he had developed and anxious about his Mother’s reaction to the whole thing. He is still very uncertain about his future. A month ago he had one more nightmare about flying. Recently he was not sleeping well, because he lies awake thinking about his situation. He admits, however, because he had nothing to do, when he does get to sleep he sleeps till noon the next day.

    During the interview the patient was calm, spoke well, somewhat reticent, but gradually told his story. He does not appear concerned or anxious. There is no evidence of depression or psychotic behaviour and thinking. His broken home does not seem to concern him much, as he was three at the time, and has always regarded his step-father highly. He has a Mother with definite tendencies towards Neurosis and it appears that he had a definite Anxiety State following his crash. At the moment I think that he feels a fair degree of concern about his future and about leaving the service under something of a clouds. His subjective complaints, however, are mainly vegetative regressive findings.

    20 June 1944, 0345 hours, took off alone from Gander and for 3 hours 10 minutes engaged in an exhibition of dangerous low flying over base and vicinity. Charges preferred on 8 July 1944; tried 18 July 1944, confirmed 11 August 1944 and Court martial dismissed him, 2 September 1944, but on 21 September 1944 he re-enlisted as a Sergeant Pilot. He was posted to No.5 OTU as second pilot and on 23 October 1944 was allocated to a Mitchell flight for instruction. Course was six weeks and he would have left about 11 December. His flight commander at No.5 OTU described him as "a very keen average pilot...neat in his appearance and had a pleasant personality...very quiet and generally well liked."

    On 6 December he took off at 0454 hours. There was no night flying, no flare path, runway was in total darkness. When 60 feet off ground he switched on navigation lights. Shot up the base for about an hour, then headed towards Abbotsford. About 0630 the base CO went into the tower to take personal charge. At 0639 Kittyhawks over field on instructions from WAC HQ with orders to shoot it down if attempt made to cross to U.S. Base CO reported (G/C D.A.R. Bradshaw):

    From then until he crashed at 1010 hours the pilot of Mitchell HD343 beat up the buildings, aerodrome and parked aircraft of Boundary Bay. His flying was utterly incredible as he continually missed buildings and aircraft at times by scant inches. At one time during the last hour he flew the entire length of the tarmac between the lines of parked aircraft and the hangars so low that his propeller tips could only have been inches from the ground. As he passed below me I could see that he was not wearing earphones. His speed practically all the time, I would estimate as varying from 240 to 270 m.p.h. A few minutes after 1000 hours the aircraft climbed to approximately 1,000 feet in an area about four miles north of the aerodrome. The fighters moved away from him as if they were uncertain as to what he was going to do. The Mitchell started to level off and when the wings were vertical [sic - he probably means horizontal - was Scratch in a vertical bank ?] the nose dropped quickly and the aircraft dove vertically, crashed and exploded instantly,

    Evidence was that Scratch had been drinking and had not gone to his quarters. At 0200 hours he visited the station Signals Section, offering a WD on duty a drink. In Liberator was a 13-ounce bottle of Jamaica Rum, 2/3 full.

    Cause of accident could have been

    (a) pure accident through loss of control at high speed.

    (b) failure of fuel supply to engines at final pull-up. In a vertical bank, if lower engine failed, the other would pull him into ground.

    (c) loss of control through exhaustion.

    (d) suicide

    (e) insanity.

    Court refused to consider (d) or (e) for lack of evidence - and all others thought him sane. It was considered that (b) and (c) were most likely - as the exertions of the flight would likely have sobered him in two hours.


    * * * * *

    Donald Palmer Whitman Scratch Born 7 July 1919 in Maymount, Saskatchewan. His father was a doctor. Home broke up when he was three and he lived with his mother, who remarried and lived in Ashmont, Alberta. Attended High School in Alberta; night course from university and two years a druggist assistant.

    Enlisted in Edmonton, 18 July 1940. To No.1 MD, Toronto, 21 July 1940. To No.119 (BR) Squadron, Yarmouth, 16 August 1940. To No.1 ITS, Toronto, 11 October 1940. Promoted LAC, 28 November 1940. On strength of No.1 MD, 29 November to 7 December 1940. To No.2 EFTS, Fort William, 8 December 1940 until 27 January 1941. No.1 MD, 28 January to 7 February 1941. To No.1 SFTS, Camp Borden, 8 February 1941. Promoted Sergeant, 28 April 1941. To No.118 Squadron, Rockcliffe, 1 May 1941. Assessed on 12 June 1941 by W/C E.A. McNab - “A sound pilot but not considered fighter pilot material.”To EAC, Halifax, 13 June 1941. To No.119 (BR) Squadron, 18 June 1941 and subsequwntly moved with that unit from Yarmouth to Sydney (11 January 1942), Mont Joli (3 May 1943). Promoted FS, 1 December 1941. Promoted WO2, 1 June 1942. Commissioned (J26269), 24 March 1943. To Station Gander, 5 June 1943. Promoted Flying Officer, 24 September 1943. To No.10 (BR) Squadron, 16 October 1943. Attended Chemical Warfare School, Suffield, 13-25 December 1943 (three hours on Bolingbroke, 4.25 on Lysander - courses in anti-gas (theory and practical) CW Air Weapons (theory and air exercises), placed 4th in a class of 6. “A very capable pilot. Was interested in the material covered and the course. Could have made better grades had he applied himself more diligently. This officer’s co-operation was noteworthy.” (S/L E.G.M. Sheffield, 27 December 1943). Struck off strength, 2 September 1944, on dismissal from His Majesty’s service.

    Taken on strength of No.3 Training Command HQ, 21 September 1944. Posted to No.1 Manning Depot. Posted 3 October 1944 to No.5 OTU, Boundary Bay. Killed 6 December 1944.

    Document dated 8 July 1944 - Charges:

    1. Improperly and without permission flew a Liberator at an altitude of less than 1,000 feet above ground level.

    2. Flew a Liberator on a flight which had not been duly authorized.

    On 29 October 1946, statement by F/O S.J. Cairns - a board seems to have considered his discharge status:

    This officer was considered a very capable pilot and a very good character. He was keenly interested in flying and even a serious aircraft accident which almost crippled him for life and kept him in hospital for six months could not change his strong desire to keep on flying. While at Gander he was employed as a co-pilot and after having a few drinks one evening, took off in a Liberator all by himself and after making several low runs over the field, left the circuit for a short time, returned and did several more low runs and then landed. During this escapade he handled the aircraft quite correctly sand with considerable skill. He states that this action was brought about by isolation and inactivity and his strong desire to do something active. This resulted in a GCM which dismissed him from the service. He re-enlisted as an NCO, 21 September 1944. On 1 December 1944 [sic] he took off a Mitchell at Boundary Bay and “beat up” the station and local country side. Finally dobe into ground off a half roll at 1,000 feet causing his death. Entitled to War Services.

    Interviewed 17 June 1940 - 5 feet 9 inches, 140 pounds, had built model aeroplanes, done fretwork, baseball, hockey, basketball. “Excellent type, gentlemanly, courteous; should make good as pilot; strongly recommended for commission as pilot.”

    At No.2 EFTS he flew 30.55 dual and 34.20 solo on Tiger Moth. Graduated 10th in a class of 27. “Appears quite conscientious and sensitive. His flying ability is of a high average. He is very keen and has the right attitude for service life. Should develop into a very good pilot. His conduct has been most satisfactory.”

    At SFTS described as “Steady pilot, good on instruments”. Flew Harvard (35.10 day dual, 23.40 day solo, 6.20 night dual, 1.40 night solo) and Yale (3.,40 day dual, 18.40 day solo). “Anxious to learn” but graduated 37th in a class of 42.

    Two brothers overseas as Medical Officers.

    Summary of Accident Investigation No.228 - Bolingbroke 9064, No.119 (BR) Squadron, Sydney, Nova Scotia, 16 March 1942. Place was Grand Lake, near Sidney. Crew were Sergeant D.P, Scratch (pilot, seriously injured), Sergeant R.L. Parker (navigator, killed), Sergeant D.C. Dickson (air gunner, slightly injured), Sergeant F.A. Connolly (WAG, slightly injured).

    Duty - Anti-submarine patrol.

    Weather - Overcast - ceiling 6,400 feet, visibility eight miles. Temperature 31.3 degrees, D.P. 27. Wind west 4 m.p.h. Cloud altostratus, 10.

    Sergeant Scratch described as an average pilot with 181 hours 15 minutes solo on Bolingbrokes.

    Description of Flight: Bolingbroke 9064 took off at 0650 hours. One third way down the runway one of the engines missed but aircraft, after running the full length of the runway, became airborne and climbed to 150 feet in a normal manner and clleared with control at 0655 hours. The aircraft climbed to 300 feet, then pilot started a slow climbing turn to starboard. Starboard engine began to miss dangerously and finally cut out. Aircraft lost altitude and airspeed rapidly. Pilot circled round Grand Lake, flew over the railway tracks, broke a high power tension wire, still losing altitude skimmed along tree tops, stalled and then with right wing low crashed to ground, totally damaged. Sergeant Parker, navigator, died of his injuries. The pilot, Sergeant Scratch, was seriously injured, and the other two occupants slightly injured.

    Findings of Investigation:

    Cause: Failure of starboard engine due to faulty sparking plugs.

    Recommendations: That units using Mercury XV engines inspect, break down and clean plugs every 40 hours, and that TE.O. E.5/20/1 be amended accordingly.

    Findings by A.O.C.: The Air Officer Commanding, Eastern Air Command, concurred in the Findings.

    Conclusions of Accidents Investigation Branch: Aircraft stalled and crashed shortly after take off due to engine failure, the exact cause of which cannot be determined.

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    Peter,

    I do recall having a quick chat with Hugh about Scratch in the LAC reading room last March as I was waiting for the file to come up.

    Like him, I also found no evidence in the file of any flight to Seattle.

    Regards,

    Dave

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    Hugh/Dave, Hi,

    VMT that very full and rapid response. Most impressive!!
    Rgds
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Hi great site I thought you like to know this crash site is part of a project being undertaken in BC we have located the field & are in the process of getting permits & equipment together first look over the site show soil contamination metal detection readings went as deep as 12 ft + my question to you is in Canada are there reports of what was removed from crash sites 99% of my recoveries have been in Europe the items recoved are to be housed in a local aviation museum...

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