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Thread: Martlesham Heath: the story of the Royal Air Force Station, 1917-1973: Book got it?

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    Default Martlesham Heath: the story of the Royal Air Force Station, 1917-1973: Book got it?

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    I was hoping someone here has this book by Gordon Kinsey and could look up the following incident for me (to see if it is mentioned)

    115 Sqn Wellington Crash on 24 December 1939

    Thanks

    Paul

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    Paul,

    I have a copy of the book, and have already checked it. There is no mention of the incident at all.

    Col.

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    Col

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    There is an article interestly in Australia (Not yet digitized) that mentions the incident

    Western Star and Roma Advertiser (Toowoomba, Qld. : 1875 - 1948)
    Friday 5 January 1940 p 6 Article...
    FIVE PARACHUTE TO SAFETY BOMBER'S CREW After a battle with German warships ships
    in the North Sea, the pilot of a damaged British bomber managed to land safely
    at his base despite darkness, hut without his crew of fire. I llo said that lie
    had told these men I to "bail out" (jump with puraehutes) ...

    Paul

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    Story repeated in Geraldton Guardian and Express (WA : 1929 - 1947)(about) Previous issue Tuesday 16 January 1940

    Text from OCR uncorrected!

    DAMAGED PLANE ♦ ? SAFE LANDING IN DARK CHEW'S PARACHUTE DESCENT [By Air Mail] London, December 30. An English flight-lieutenant, with the wing flaps and undercarriage wheels of his bomber shot clean away in a battle with German warships over the North Sea, landed his damaged plane in the dark at an English air base this week and stepped out unscratched. Airmen who had rushed to help him out asked : '?Where are the others?' 'Why are you alone?' He answered: 'Oh, they 'bailed out' a little way back. There were five of them, and I got them to jump out by parachute, because I thought I wasn't going to be able to bring this crate down safely.' By the time he had finished his story, reports were coming in by telephone from an area of ten miles around, telling of the landing of his crew. The first came down inTjie middle of a field. He was just' untying his parachute harness when a farmer, carrying a hurricane lamp and a double-barrelled gun, appeared out of the darkness and ordered : 'Stay where you are.' The officer, telling the story afterwards said : 'The farmer sus pected that I was a German airman, perhaps a spy who was trying to land in the darkness. 'I told him 'for heaven's sake put that gun down. It might go off,1 but just the same, I kept my hands up until he was satisfied I was O.K.' I Two others landed near each other in a wood. They walked together to a cottage and knocked up an old woman who lives there. She was suspicious of these men in flying suits. She shut, the door in their faces, and would not open it again. Another of the crew, asked for the telephone as soon as he arrived at the airfield. Hp said : 'T liari a nremoni
    tion something was going to happen to me . on this flight, so I gave all my money, about thirty 'bob.' to my best pal. ' I told him he could keep it if I didn't come back. By now our machine has probably been posted as missing, and unless I get through quickly on the phone he'll have spent my money.' The fifth was the only one injured. His parachute had caught in a high tree just as he was landing. He shook himself free from the branch, fell heavily to the ground and broke an ankle.
    me iivp were orougnt m oy far i thp airfield. From what they said it is believed that the pilot decided to take a. chance with his own life in a bid- to land the machine. If he had abandoned it in mid-air, and jumped with his own parachute, the unpiloted plane might hove crashed on a town or a yillagef causing loss of life,


    the 100% proof this was the P/O Roy A Gayford incident is in the sentence
    "fifth was the only one injured. His parachute had caught in a high tree just as he was landing. He shook himself free from the branch, fell heavily to the ground and broke an ankle."

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