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Thread: RAF Aircraft Accident Card abbreviation

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    Default RAF Aircraft Accident Card abbreviation

    I see on a WWII Form 78 Accident Record Card the abbreviation FBO(3) under the heading 'Write off or Strike off Details - Extent of Damage'

    Can anyone tell me what this abbreviation is for.

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    "FBO" is the loss Category lettering.

    According to AP1301 it was thought that 'FB' meant Flying Battle casualty. But two AM1180 examples of an aircraft brought down by firing was 'OD'.

    Aircraft Loss/Damage signals in TNA, with the Category 'FB' stated the cause was either unknown or 'NK' meaning 'Not Known'.

    The letter "O" meant Operations and was an Operational Loss.

    An AM 78 example for Whitley P5012 has 15.12.40 FBO(3) Missing. (Write off 31.12.40).
    An AM 78 example for Whitley P5042 has 10/11.?.40 FBO Missing. (Struck off 17.9.40).
    An AM 78 example for Whitley P5010 has 5.3.41 FBO (E) In Sea.

    FAT was Flying Accident Training
    FAO was Flying Accident Operations

    Not really sure about the (3), but possibly total loss, or a type of accounting loss analysis?

    Mark
    Last edited by Mark Hood; 28th June 2013 at 23:04.

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    Thanks Mark. I had seen FBO3 for an aircraft that went missing over the North Sea in 1940. Similar circumstances to the Whitley P5012 you mention.
    David

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    Default A.M. 78 Aircraft Card

    Hello David

    I am beginning to wonder if the last part of the other number, the SOC or Write Off number (sometimes written on the front side of the Card), usually (but not always) beginning "41G" [41 Group] or "43G" [43 Group] is more important. I'm looking at some A.M.78 now which say:-
    /Eq 'E'
    /Eq/2 (dated after Strike off)
    /F149 (Accident Card for this aircraft had wireless H/F D.F. trouble and bearings were 120 degs out)
    /Eg2/1 'E'
    /E2

    Others are written off with an F number (likely a Form) e.g. F149, or occasionally with an A.M.O (Air Ministry Order) number. Although you must bear in mind at the time of being SOC or Written Off, some investigations were still ongoing, or later revisited.

    I have a Summer 1940 Whitley V Captain's Log Book photocopies (from his family) and they had a lot of Merlin engine trouble and yet his 2nd Pilot's Log Book photocopies just states "Operations". Some examples could be and confirmed in paperwork to RR in 1940/41 for the Merlin X are:-
    Engine (Carb) icing
    Engine Overheating
    Low Oil Pressure
    Engine fires
    Faulty Cylinder Blocks (coolant leaks still a problem in 1942) and Cylinder Block casting blockages preventing coolant circulation.
    Instruction to renew cylinder blocks 20 August 1940 to the modified Merlin X cylinder block.
    Cylinder Liners.
    Grommet failures between castings causing coolant or oil leaks.
    Supercharger casing failure.
    Tool Amendment Lists (to ensure correct reaming etc., tools were used).
    Flame traps and burnt out / broken valves
    Main Bearing ['big end' I presume] failures (mainly on other Merlin fighter variants)
    Fuel starvation 'G' forces (mainly on fighters)

    Generally when organisations write something off, they (like the Air Ministry) have to account for the reason to write off and/or what Department the write-off is against. I'm left thinking that Eq was Equipment and Eg was engine? I need to do some more analysing of cards.

    Mark
    Last edited by Mark Hood; 30th June 2013 at 11:32.

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    Mark,
    Main bearings are the major engine bearings in which the crankshaft runs; the lesser bearings (although no less important!) are the connecting rod bearings (which transfer the force from the descending piston to the crankshaft), usually known as the "big end" (running on the crank throw bearings) and the "little end" (on outer end of the con rod), connecting piston to con rod via the gudgeon pin, latter also known sometimes as wrist pin.
    David D

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    Hello David

    Thank you for correcting me, regarding "Main Bearings" being the bearings which the Crankshaft revolves in.

    Even the Rolls Royce Merlin Aero-Engine Manual for "Main Bearings" states see Crankshaft.

    The 'big end' bearing being the Connecting ('Con') Rod to Crankshaft Bearing.
    The 'little end' bearing being the Connecting ('Con') Rod to Piston Gudgeon Pin bearing.

    I'm sorry for suggesting the 'big end' bearing was the same as the 'Main Bearing' in error, I should of known better doing my own motorbike repairs in my youth!

    Mark

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Hood View Post
    "FBO" is the loss Category lettering.

    According to AP1301 it was thought that 'FB' meant Flying Battle casualty. But two AM1180 examples of an aircraft brought down by firing was 'OD'.

    Aircraft Loss/Damage signals in TNA, with the Category 'FB' stated the cause was either unknown or 'NK' meaning 'Not Known'.

    The letter "O" meant Operations and was an Operational Loss.

    An AM 78 example for Whitley P5012 has 15.12.40 FBO(3) Missing. (Write off 31.12.40).
    An AM 78 example for Whitley P5042 has 10/11.?.40 FBO Missing. (Struck off 17.9.40).
    An AM 78 example for Whitley P5010 has 5.3.41 FBO (E) In Sea.

    FAT was Flying Accident Training
    FAO was Flying Accident Operations

    Not really sure about the (3), but possibly total loss, or a type of accounting loss analysis?

    Mark
    Hello David

    AM 78

    I am sorry, but I'm not entirely happy about these comments I made above, in respect of the AM78 Aircraft Card, alias Movement Card.

    After reading A.P. 1301 (reprinted June 1940), with an explanation of FA and FB and which should be used as a prefix on Casualty Signals, the "FB." prefix on a Casualty Signal meant the aircraft was on "Operational" duty.

    "FB." is Operational flying

    "FA" prefix on a Casualty Signal means Non-operational flying.

    "FB" does not always mean Flying Battle, in the sense of being engaged.

    Mark
    Last edited by Mark Hood; 18th May 2015 at 16:44.

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    "FA" prefix on a Casualty Signal does not mean Non-operational flying as you state.

    FA is defined in Kings Regulations and ACI

    1326 Flying Accidents

    1-"Flying accidents" shall, as regards courts of inquiry, be deemed to include all accidents arising from causes (other than enemy action) connected with flying, and shall include not only those arising in flight, but also those arising -

    (a) in starting the aircraft for its flight, including airscrew accidents;
    (b) in landing, or alighting on water, after its flight; and
    (c) in hoisting an aircraft out of or into a ship and securing it on board.

    So FA can mean Operational Flying if the cause was not enemy action. This is evidenced with the AO box in Form 1180 to denote a sub category of Flying Accident of Air Operations.

    As regards use in Casualty Returns/Messages

    Appendix III of AP 1301 RAF War Manual Part II that you have referenced elsewhere has four Message signals for Casualties and a clarification of Note 3

    Note 3 - All flying battle casualties or flying accidents, non flying battle casualties and accidents, deaths or dangerous illness occurring to an officer, nurse, airman or personnel of other services and the change from the latter condition, will be immediately reported by signal.

    ...

    Message "A"
    Flying Battle Casualties or Flying Accidents

    The subject matter of the message will commence with the originator's reference number and date followed by the letters "F.B." for a flying battle casualty and "F.A." for a flying accident followed by:-....

    ...
    Message "B"
    Non Flying Battle Casualties

    ...

    Message "C"
    Natural Deaths or Illnesses

    ...

    Message "D"
    Accidental or Self-Inflicted Injuries

    So "F.B." on a casualty signal means flying battle casualty in the sense of being caused by enemy action while flying by what ever means.

    Ross
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    Hello Ross

    I read that too in AP 1301Appendix III, to begin with. But it is misleading.

    Because, if you go down the page there is an explanation of when FA or FB should be used as a prefix to a Casualty Signal.

    "At the beginning of the message "F.A." is to be confined to non-operational flying and "F.B." to operational flying casualties or accidents even though the casualty or accident is not directly due to enemy action." AP 1301 Appx. III, reprinted June 1940.

    I recently put some scans of this on another posting. They are in the RAF Commands Gallery.

    Regarding Accident Cards (AM 1180) as you know they are separated into three
    AO Air Operations
    FA
    FB which seems to be Flying Battle, as in terms of being engaged by another aircraft.

    Regards Mark

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    Ah..
    You are looking at a snapshot from one document which relates to the period between June 1940 and Dec 1940.

    AP 1301. First print issued 1928/30 amended to end 1939
    http://www.rafaircraftaccidents.com/IMG_0183.JPG

    AP 1301. Second print issued June 1940
    as per your scan in the Gallery

    AP 1301. Second Edition issued Dec 1954

    Vol 1 and Vol II of AP 1301 have different issue dates for first and second print.

    The preamble text of Appendix III and Message A unchanged between the First print and Second print for parts A and D.

    Text of part E altered, new text added F, G, H J and the usage clause quoted.
    Usage clause removed post Dec 1940 but additional parts to J retained (I do not have a date for the change but see AM 1180 variations below for approximate date). The MLRS pdf is the second print Feb/Jun 1940 without subsequent amendments,

    Definition clause for FA from AP 958 KR&ACI unchanged 1939 to 1944

    The Flying Accident Card 1180 changed roughly inline with AP 1301 amendments to usage.

    AM 1180 to 5th May 1940 - no subclass denoted (AM 1188 used for forced landings)
    AM 1180 from 6th May 1940 to 30th Dec 1940 - new box added to front page, upper left. Category FA, AO or FB.
    AM 1180 from 31st Dec 1940 to 31st Dec 1941- Requirement to state Category FA, AO, FB deleted. Box text removed
    F 1180 from 1st Jan 1942 onwards. First use of edge code card, Requirement to state AO reinstated. No requirement to state FA or FB.

    Ross
    Last edited by Ross_McNeill; 18th May 2015 at 14:18. Reason: tidy of text
    The Intellectual Property contained in this message has been assigned specifically to this web site.
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