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Thread: PRATA Flights

  1. #1
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    Default PRATA Flights

    Hello,

    Does any one know what is a 'PRATA' flight for a Met Sqn?

    Thanks

    Phil

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    Phil, Hi,

    PRATA = PRessure And Temperature Ascent.

    Rgds

    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Phil,

    At the beginning of the war the Met Office had no data it could use to forecast contrails, since the only upper air information it had only went up to 24000 ft (the THUM ascents by 1401 and 1402 Met Flights).

    Spitfires (I'd have to check the Mark) were attached to the Met Flights to fly PRATAs to high level - the target height was 40000 ft. Unfortunately the first Spitfires used could only struggle to about 34000 ft. The first PRATA was flown at Aldergrove during October 1941, but they did not become routine until the following March. PRATAs were flown at Aldergrove, Wick and Bircham Newton, one daily in the first instance (T/O 0630), but later in the war an additional ascent was made at around midday. Later PRATAs were also made at Manston.

    Only pressure and temperature were recorded during an ascent, hence the name PRATA - PRessure And Temperature Ascent.

    Brian.

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