Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Does anybody recognise this incident before May 15th 1940

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,813
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 77 Times in 70 Posts

    Default Does anybody recognise this incident before May 15th 1940

    Found the following article. Very interesting, though not enough detail for a positive ID. I suspected it may be Hurricane N2333 of 3 Sqn which was Abandoned at Night on 10th May 1940 and crashed near Bere Farm RDF station, Dover Pilot was Canadian Flying Officer Albert Ransome Ball #40069 but anyone prove otherwise

    Wednesday 15 May 1940 , Evening Telegraph , Angus, Scotland
    UNDERCARRIAGE JAMMEDóJUMP IN DARKNESS
    Another R.A.F. pilot has qualified for membership of the Caterpillar Club. He is a pilot at a Fighter Command station, and when his undercarriage was damaged during recent night-flying exercises he was forced to .bale out.
    While in the air the pilot discovered that he could lower only one wheel of the plane's undercarriage. He reported by radio telephone his squadron C.O. on the ground, and flew along the aerodrome's flare path to demonstrate the faulty undercart. To attempt a one-wheel landing, risky any time, might be disastrous in the darkness. The C.O. ordered him to remain aloft. . Constant touch was kept with him radio telephone. He was ordered up to 6000 feet, where flew in circles for a considerable time in order to exhaust his petrol. There was no need to add fire to the anxieties of the night. Neighbouring Observer Corps and searchlight posts were warned to expect a crash. Exact instructions were given to the pilot. Another fighter was sent up to keep him company. Last instructions went crackling up radio. The pilot was facetiously reminded by the C.O. that when pulling the handring which releases the parachute he must not drop the ring and lose it, because there is a fine of 5s for its replacement. At last the petrol was , the engine was idling. Directing his aircraft towards open country away from villages, the pilot left the controls, opened the cockpit door, stepped out on to the main wing, took one look at the black-out below, and, his own words, went down like a bomb He aimed to land beside a searchlight post, and actually dropped on his back, only a trifle shaken, within 200 yards of it. The aircraft flew on to crash within 200 yards of it. The aircraft flew on to crash. When the pilot was picked up by a car sent out his C.O, he was found enjoying large cup tea at nearby farmóand still had his parachute ring. "

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    6,527
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 42 Times in 40 Posts

    Default

    Hello,

    Friday, 10 May, 1940.

    BRITISH AIR FORCES IN FRANCE.

    3 SQUADRON, MERVILLE

    Hurricane N2333.

    Abandoned over St. Margarets Bay, off Dover, having lost bearings in dark after attack on He111 over Lille 10.30 p.m. Flying Officer A. R. Ball baled unhurt. Aircraft lost.

    See:
    The Battle of France Then and Now.
    Cornwell,Peter.
    Old Harlow:Battle of Britain International,2007.
    p.180.

    Col.
    Last edited by COL BRUGGY; 4th July 2013 at 13:50.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,813
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 77 Times in 70 Posts

    Default

    Col

    Not that incident then!

    Thanks

    Paul

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    6,527
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 42 Times in 40 Posts

    Default

    Paul,

    Strong possibilty - Night flying - Drem:

    26-4-1940
    No.603 Sqn.
    Spitfire Ia L1025

    Undercarriage jam after heavy touch and go landing. Aircraft abandoned. Category 'E'.

    41879 P/O (Pilot) Basil Gerald "Stapme" STAPLETON RAF - Injured, knee.

    A good example of this (engine exhaust affecting night vision), was when P/O Stapleton jumped by parachute after the undercarriage of his Spitfire L1025 had been damaged while attempting a night landing. Stapme was ordered to climb and bale out but landed heavily and damaged a knee. He kept the injury from the MO in case he was taken off flying. In 1998, after years of discomfort, the knee was replaced.

    See:
    The Greatest Squadron of Them All:The Definitive History of 603 (City of Edinburgh) Squadron, RAUXF. Vol.I - Formation to the end of 1940.
    Ross,David,Blanche,Bruce & William Simpson.
    London:Grub Street,2003.
    pp.123-4

    Col.
    Last edited by COL BRUGGY; 4th July 2013 at 15:12.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,813
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 77 Times in 70 Posts

    Default

    Col

    I am 99% sure you have it the newspaper being from Scotland (Angus) and the location of Stampe's baleout (Tyninghame, East Lothian) Scotland is a good clue.

    I wonder if anyone here has the biography of Stampe

    "Stapme: The Biography of Squadron Leader Basil Gerald Stapleton"

    And see if the incident is mentioned? -

    His Obit in telegraph mentions

    "On September 7 Stapleton's Spitfire was hit by enemy fire, but he managed to force-land his badly damaged aircraft. A young couple having a picnic in an adjacent field gave him a restorative cup of tea before driving him back to his airfield. "

    I wonder if the 'Cup of tea' story has been wrongly attributed!

    Thanks

    Paul
    Last edited by paulmcmillan; 4th July 2013 at 15:47.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    271
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Hi Paul

    Yes Stampe has a page about it including quote from the man himself, and quote of L1025 from the ORB.


    Can forward if you require
    Peter Colwill

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,813
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 77 Times in 70 Posts

    Default

    Peter

    Thanks

    You have PM

    Paul

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Posts
    9
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default A R Ball

    COL BRUGGY
    I found your post by accident. I am assuming your comment is referring to my uncle Flying Officer Albert Ransome (Dick) Ball. I was pleased to read this post as I know very little of his RAF history. I have sent out several requests in the past but only received a report on his final mission. I had heard he was a capable pilot and had shot down a number of German planes but have no other information. I would love to know more.

    Can you suggest where I might be able to access more of his military records. Any information would be appreciated.

    John Ball


    Quote Originally Posted by COL BRUGGY View Post
    Hello,

    Friday, 10 May, 1940.

    BRITISH AIR FORCES IN FRANCE.

    3 SQUADRON, MERVILLE

    Hurricane N2333.

    Abandoned over St. Margarets Bay, off Dover, having lost bearings in dark after attack on He111 over Lille 10.30 p.m. Flying Officer A. R. Ball baled unhurt. Aircraft lost.

    See:
    The Battle of France Then and Now.
    Cornwell,Peter.
    Old Harlow:Battle of Britain International,2007.
    p.180.

    Col.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Suffolk
    Posts
    832
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Hi John

    If you'll let me have your postal address (by e-mail) I will send you a copy of my 'Twelve Days in May', in which your uncle has a few mentions. The book is dated now but should give you some idea of his activities.

    Cheers
    Brian
    briancullauthor@gmail.com PS I hope you live in the UK!



    Quote Originally Posted by Johnball View Post
    COL BRUGGY
    I found your post by accident. I am assuming your comment is referring to my uncle Flying Officer Albert Ransome (Dick) Ball. I was pleased to read this post as I know very little of his RAF history. I have sent out several requests in the past but only received a report on his final mission. I had heard he was a capable pilot and had shot down a number of German planes but have no other information. I would love to know more.

    Can you suggest where I might be able to access more of his military records. Any information would be appreciated.

    John Ball

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Posts
    9
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Brian

    I much appreciate your kind offer. I want/need to know more about my uncle. I will email you directly with my address.

    thanks so much
    john

    QUOTE=brian;138704]Hi John

    If you'll let me have your postal address (by e-mail) I will send you a copy of my 'Twelve Days in May', in which your uncle has a few mentions. The book is dated now but should give you some idea of his activities.

    Cheers
    Brian
    briancullauthor@gmail.com PS I hope you live in the UK![/QUOTE]

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •