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Thread: James Aitken Hutchison 951362 14/04/1942. 144 Squadron.

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    Default James Aitken Hutchison 951362 14/04/1942. 144 Squadron.

    I am looking for information on the chap mentioned above.

    More specifically the aircraft he died on.

    I also have 3 others who died on the day with 144 Sqn so possibly his crew mates.

    Can anyone provide more information.

    I have,

    S W C CULMER 1283606

    D MANNING 1112428

    R E G NATION 925007

    Does anyone have any additional.
    Regards Scott McIntosh

    ACIA Researcher

    Search for Air Crash Investigation & Archaeology on Facebook for our groups page.

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    I suggest getting a copy of Chorley for details on this loss. Interlibrary loan is also a way.

    Failing that the ORB can be downloaded for just over 3 from the TNA.

    Ross
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    Copyright Ross McNeill 2015/2018 - All rights reserved.

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    In an ideal world I would own all of these books but alas I always have next to no money.

    Desperately trying to change that but always seem to be behind. Anyhow I am not complaining.

    Thanks for that Ross I had forgotten about the NA method and will try downloading the ORB tommorrow.

    I intend to purchase chorleys when and if I can.

    Ross tell me I have seen mention or Warner in relation to a lot of Henks posts. Which book or books does this refer to?

    Many thanks.
    Regards Scott McIntosh

    ACIA Researcher

    Search for Air Crash Investigation & Archaeology on Facebook for our groups page.

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    I downloaded both entries in the ORB this morning for 144 Sqn in April 1942 one at 16 pages which held the information I was after and one at 20 pages which was the bombing raid reports.

    Very good results for this record.

    It would seem our chaps were aboard Hampden AT110 heading for it looks like Dortmund or perhaps Essen as there were 2 entries for that night. More likely to be Dortmund as this is where the bulk of the aircraft were headed.

    They took off from North Luffenham and crashed near Bognor Regis. All killed. This is the entire crew listed here.

    With interest I noted that Hutchison was obviously on quite a number of missions as AG and one such mission in that month being unsuccesful and having to land on base with a full bomb load.

    How common was this? Very or now and again. I can only imagine they didnt want to drop bombs in cloud in case they hit another aircraft or somewhere on the mainland.

    If they had been out at sea and unable to complete the mission for whatever reason Would they or could they have dropped the bombs at sea to make a safer landing. What was the general policy regarding landing with bomb loads.

    Obviously the most desirable outcome was to drop over the target or nearest available enemy target.
    Regards Scott McIntosh

    ACIA Researcher

    Search for Air Crash Investigation & Archaeology on Facebook for our groups page.

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    Hi Scott

    The Hampden they were flying in was Hampden AT110. 144 Squadron operations on the night were to Dortmund. The loss position of AT110 near Felpham, just east of Bognor Regis is recorded at 22.15hrs. The majority going to Dortmund took off from North Luffenham between 21.45 and 21.50hrs. The take off times and the recorded accident time cannot be reconciled. The loss position on the coast of Sussex is also wrong for anybody going to Dortmund, those heading for Dortmund would have crossed the East Anglian coast at Orford Ness.

    Bomber Command also ran an operation to Le Havre that night.

    There were large changes taking place amongst air crew within 144 Squadron. The squadron was about to leave Bomber Command and move to Coastal Command. Experienced crews were being transferred within Bomber Command squadrons, with the large intake from OTUs being prepared for the move. Sgt Hutchison had been with the squadron since the beginning of November 41, Sgt Culmer had arrived Boxing Day 41, both Sgts Manning and Nation were new to the squadron. The crew was a scratch/new crew, it was often the case to introduce a new crew to operations by sending them to bomb enemy ports, Le Havre, Ostende, Dunkirk etc. Not the heavily defended ports in Germany or Brest in France. With no report it is guess work that this new crew were sent to Le Havre taking off before the Dortmund operation. Exactly when depends on whether the aircraft crashed out bound or returning from Le Havre. As I say this is my assumption and must not be recorded as fact.

    My interest in the aircraft is due to a family connection. My father was one of those leaving the squadron having completed his tour of operations. He used AT110 to fly himself to Scampton on the 11 April aboard were Sgts McDougall, Brooks, and Collinson. No return flight is recorded in my fathers Log, therefore we can assume Sgt McDougall flew it back to North Luffenham.

    AT 110 had been with the squadron since the end of March 42, less than a month but had already been mining off Terrschelling 28/3/42, Le Havre 1/4/42, Cologne 5/4/42, Hamburg 8/4/42, Le Havre 10/4/42, Essen 12/4/42, Mining off Heligoland 13/4/42. LOST 14/4/42. Sgt Manning had been on two of these previous operations but the aircraft flew with a different make up of crew each time.

    Hope this adds to your interest in the aircraft.

    John
    Last edited by WOODHEAD; 19th August 2013 at 13:05. Reason: date correction

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    Thanks John,

    A most comprehensive reply. It adds a lot to my understanding of bomber squadrons and crews.

    I wonder where they were actually going.
    Regards Scott McIntosh

    ACIA Researcher

    Search for Air Crash Investigation & Archaeology on Facebook for our groups page.

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