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Thread: Award Citations HELP!

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    Default Award Citations HELP!

    Gents,

    I have around 20 airman who were awarded either a DFC or DFM I have not been able to locate the citations for, I have checked the LG, DFC & DFM books etc.

    I am planning a visit to the NA in the next week or so. I am aware they are found under Air 2, having not previously checked these files, how are they set out, is it by date, service number, command or group.

    Any pointers most welcome.

    Regards

    Steve
    No.218 (Gold Coast) Squadron Association Historian
    No.623 squadron Research

    ~~IN TIME ~~

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    Names, please.

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    Hi Hugh,

    The most pressing chaps at the moment are :

    Wing Commander E J Little DFC
    Pilot Officer G J Woodmason DFC
    Flying Officer G H R Treasure RNZAF DFC ( have part of this citation)
    Pilot Officer M W Nesbitt DFC ( citation very short, hoping there was more details)
    Squadron Leader F J Austin DFC
    Flight Lieutenant D Smith DFC DFM ( require DFC )
    Flying Officer P J Bowering RAAF DFC

    Thanks in advance,

    Steve
    No.218 (Gold Coast) Squadron Association Historian
    No.623 squadron Research

    ~~IN TIME ~~

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    Immediately to hand I have the following:

    AUSTIN, Frederick John, S/L (40168, Royal Air Force) - No.623 Squadron - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 October 1943. I am not sure where found this:

    "Since July 1943, this officer has been employed as a flight commander in which capacity he has shown outstanding ability. He has taken part in numerous operational sorties against targets in the Middle East, Far East and Germany. In the ace of the enemy he has consistently displayed courage and determination of a high order."

    WOODMASON, William George Jack, P/O (46823, Royal Air Force) - No.218 Squadron - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 13 February 1942. Air Ministry Bulletin 6298 has citation. See also RAF Quarterly, June 1942.

    "This officer participated in the squadron's operational activities in France and afterwards when it operated from this country. He has shown himself to be an outstanding navigator/bomb aimer, whose efficiency, devotion to duty and coolness in action have enabled his crew to carry out highly successful raids on long distance targets such as Berlin, Stettin and Turin in difficult weather conditions.

    "On one occasion, whilst attacking Duisburg, one engine of his aircraft was put out of action by enemy shellfire. Nevertheless, his captain jettisoned all moveable gear and kept the aircraft flying, and Pilot Officer Woodmason navigated it back to base where a safe landing was made."

    More to follow (I hope). Can you be more specific about Smith ? There are 127802 A/S/L David Smith, DFM (awarded DFC 12 November 1943, No.90 Squadron) and 135269 F/L Denis Norman Smith, DFM (awarded DFC 4 December 1945, No.109 Squadron).
    Last edited by HughAHalliday; 1st October 2013 at 21:28.

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    Further to my last, I believe you will find something in the following files:

    Little - AIR 2/8904

    Woodmason - This seems to be a black hole known as "Press Release" - no further details as to source.

    Austin - AIR 2/8983 may have a more detailed recommendation.

    Nebitt - Another black hole.

    Bowering - AIR 2/8882
    Last edited by HughAHalliday; 1st October 2013 at 22:49.

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    Best bet for Treasure is AIR 2/9026.

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    Dear Hugh,

    Thank you for taking the time and trouble in replying. Re Smith;

    127802 A/S/L David Smith, DFM (awarded DFC 12 November 1943, No.90 Squadron is the man in question

    I have another few chaps Hugh if you don't mind :

    W/Cdr W J Smith 39134 RAFO DFC
    WO F Taylor 1057598 RAFVR DFC
    S/Ldr E F Sly 46091 RAF ( I have part )
    S/Ldr A J Samson 78850 RAFVR

    Thank you again Hugh. Happy to send on copies when and if I locate them.

    Kind regards

    Steve
    No.218 (Gold Coast) Squadron Association Historian
    No.623 squadron Research

    ~~IN TIME ~~

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    SMITH, David, A/S/L, DFM (127802, RAFVR*) - No.90 Squadron - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 12 November 1943. A sales catalogue of Eugene G. Ursual, circa 1992, advertises the sale of his medals plus a log book with entries from 7 May 1939 to 31 May 1945. Born 31 December 1919. Joined RAF, 5 May 1939. Retired as a Squadron Leader. Flew 53 missions on Wellingtons and Stirlings with Nos.115, 90 and 623 Squadrons. On 2 November 1944 he was seconded from No.26 OTU to British Overseas Airways Corporation, getting a formal command in July 1945. Flew Dakota, Halifax, Halton, York, Hermes, Comet, Constellation, Britannia, Boeing 707 and Boeing 747. In March 1958 he brought the Queen Mother back from Nairobi in a Britannia 102 via Entebbe, Khartoum and Malta. His last flight with British Airways was 10 November 1974. Upon his retirement, as senior captain, he was awarded the Queen’s Commendation for Valuab;e Services in the Air. He continued to fly 707s with Air Siam to Bangkok and then Air Lanka. His final flight was 24 July 1981. After 42 years of flying he had amassed a total of 22,497 hours. Died 16 July 1990.

    Although the catalogue gave no citations or recommendations, it included a few notes about his wartime flying, viz: Targets in 1941 (No.115 Squadron), Bremen, Rotterdam, Wilhelmshaven, Hanover, Boulogne, Brest, Emden, Kiel, Mannheim, Hamburg, Cologne, Hamm, Munster. Targets in 1942 (No.90 Squadron), Krefeld, Mulheim, Wuppertal, Gelsenkirchen, Aachen, Hamburg, Essen, Turin, Munchen Gladbach, Berlin, Modan and Hanover (this was raid No.53).

    There is a block of awards circa November 1943 where recommendations for DFCs and DFMs seem to have fallen into a black hole. This is one such case.

    SMITH, W.J. - try AIR 2/9137.

    SAMSON, Arthur James, A/S/L (78850, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve) - No.218 Squadron - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 12 January 1943. Born 1915 in St.John’s, Newfoundland; home at Barrow-in-Furness. Described on Commonwealth War Grave website as “Son of Israel James Samson and Constance Samson; husband of Amy M. Samson, of Cheadle, Cheshire.” Enlisted in RAF Reserve in 1936; commissioned 1940; attained rank of Squadron Leader in August 1942. Killed 8 September 1945 as a Wing Commander in No.117 Squadron; name on Singapore Memorial. Following text from Air Ministry Bulletin 8877.

    For the last three months Squadron Leader Samson has been employed as a flight commander. One night in July 1942, he attacked Saarbrucken, despite intense anti-aircraft fire, and on another occasion in August he flew a very badly damaged aircraft safely back to base. One night in September 1942, when approaching Munich, his aircraft was caught in a cone of searchlights and subjected to very heavy fire from the ground defences. Nevertheless, Squadron Leader Samson proceeded and attacked his objective. On the return journey he was again heavily attacked by anti-aircraft fire and the second pilot and flight engineer were wounded. Despite great difficulties, this officer flew his aircraft home and effected a forced lading without damage. Squadron Leader Samson has proved to be a cool, courageous captain with a fine sense of leadership.



    SLY, Ernest Frank, A/S/L, DFM (46091, Royal Air Force) - No.218 Squadron - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 May 1943. Public Record Office Air 2/8949 has citation drafted when he had flown 20 sorties (115 hours). There appears to be some question as to whether he was called “Frank Ernest” or “Ernest Frank”.

    In November 1942, while on operations against Stuttgart, one engine of this officer’s aircraft became unserviceable while over the target area. Despite this, he pressed home his attack in a daring manner, and returned safely to base. On another occasion, while minelaying in the Baltic, Squadron Leader Sly was forced to bring his aircraft down to 300 feet owing to damage sustained in combat with an enemy fighter. By superb airmanship and determination a safe return was made. Squadron Leader Sly has, at all times, displayed high courage and devotion to duty.


    TAYLOR, Frank, Warrant Officer (1057598, RAFVR*) - No.218 Squadron - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 25 September 1945. Citation in Air Ministry Bulletin 19759.

    Warrant Officer Taylor has completed his first tour of operations during which he has delivered attacks on Wesel, Duisburg, Cologne, Dresden and Munich. In February 1945, on the return flight from an attack on Dresden, the two outer engines of his aircraft became unserviceable. Warrant Officer Taylor successfully manipulated his equipment, thereby enabling the aircraft to return safely to base. As a wireless operator, he has always maintained a high standard of skill.
    Last edited by HughAHalliday; 2nd October 2013 at 10:45.

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    SLY, ERNEST FRANK
    Rank:Squadron Leader
    Trade:Pilot
    Service No:46091
    Date of Death:14/01/1944
    Royal Air Force, 514 Sqdn.
    Awards: D F C, A F M
    Grave Reference: Coll. grave 1. A. 8-9.
    Cemetery: HANOVER WAR CEMETERY


    The London Gazette gives his DFC award as Acting Squadron Leader Ernest Frank SLY, A.F.M. (46091), No. 218 Squadron.

    Notice of him being commissioned on 28 June 1941 states 566485 Sergeant Ernest Frank Sly AFM commissioned as Pilot Officer.
    Last edited by PeteS; 2nd October 2013 at 16:44.

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    My excuse - if God had intended us to be perfect She would never have put erasers on pencils.

    SLY, Frank Ernest, Sergeant (566485, Royal Air Force) - unit ? - Air Force Medal - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 October 1940. Medals sold at auction on 11 June 1996 for £ 2,150. Information from website of Dix-Noonan-Webb (medal dealers). Later commissioned and awarded DFC, 14 May 1943, for services with No.218 Squadron. With respect to his AFM, the website credits the following to “a contemporary newscutting.” See also Air Ministry Bulletin 2214.

    A twenty-three year old Royal Air Force flying instructor, who when his plane was damaged in a collision with a pupil’s aircraft, landed in a field with one wing off and the other damaged, and with his undercarriage retracted, has been awarded the Air Force Medal. He is Sergeant. Frank Sly, a flying instructor in the advanced training squadron of a flying training school. His award is for “exceptional valour, courage and devotion to duty whilst flying, though not in active operations against the enemy.” Sergeant. Sly was carrying out formation flying practise in a twin-engined training aircraft with a pupil in another aircraft of the same type.

    On reaching 900 feet his passenger noticed that the pupil’s aircraft was approaching from practically dead astern, and was just about to cause a collision. Sergeant. Sly immediately banked his aircraft to the left, but was unable to prevent the other aircraft coming into a collision with his starboard wing and severing it just beyond the engine. By using full left aileron and full starboard engine - his right aileron having dropped off complete with the torn off wing - Sergeant. Sly succeeded in regaining control of his aircraft. He flew straight for two miles. Meanwhile the starboard wing continued to break up. But at last the Sergeant got his damaged aircraft down and landed.

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