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Thread: Rear Gunner R.J. Esling

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    Default Rear Gunner R.J. Esling

    Good morning,

    I'm doing some research into R.J. Esling 637565, a gunner on Wellingtons during WWII. He was with the 115 Squadron. All I know thus far is that he failed to return from operations in Duisberg on 13-7-42 out of Marham. I have read that two Wellingtons did not return on this night, but that is all I know.

    Any information, or leads in the right direction, would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks in advance,

    Josh

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    Hello ,

    According Bomber Command Losses 1942 by W R Chorley , page 150 , Wellington X-3560 KO-K from N 115 Sqdn was coned by searchlights and hit by flak , wich crippled the starboard engine. Lost height and abondoned near Nijnsel ( North Brabant in Holland ) , 13 km north from Eindhoven.While in captivity at Lamsdorf , Sgt Esling exchanged identity with LCpl E Lawrence.

    Regards

    Alain12

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    Thank you very much. That information alone led me here: http://www.darleys.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/dad/page5.html, and now I know the story of the crash.

    I recently came into owning Sgt. Esling's logbook. What an incredible piece of history! Looking at the logbook it actually states that he was the front gunner on this particular flight.
    Last edited by jsand85; 11th October 2013 at 18:20.

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    Would that likely make him the RJ Lawrence listed here? http://www.rafcommands.com/Air%20For...ery%20L_1.html

    What was the point of the name/ identity change?

    Thanks for all the help!

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    The exchange of ID's by an aircrew prisoner was likely done to enable him to join a working party (routinely formed of British soldier prisoners by the Germans) because while out working on farms or similar there would be a much greater opportunity to escape. regards Pete.

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    Thanks for the great info. Continuing my research!

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