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Thread: Twin engine bomber that bombed itself.

  1. #1
    Cutstone Guest

    Default Twin engine bomber that bombed itself.

    The strange title of this thread is related to a bombing-mission to Sola in Norway 29/04/1941. On the small island Rott, just northwest of the airfield, the Germans had placed a listening devise and a searchlight. This was the target of this mission, or at least one of the targets.
    After the first plane dropped its bombs the second one came in. It dropped its bombes but one bombe bounced of the ground and exploded in the air. Shrapnel hit the aircraft and brought it down. All that were found was a few papers and a boot, containing human remains.
    At Sola war memorial graveyard there is "only" one allied pilot registered diseased that day; Flight Lieutenant RALPH ERIC TALLIS. I know he flew a Blenheim Mk IV - V6451 - with the 82. sqdn. for Coastal Command, but is he the pilot of the aircraft that crashed near Rott? Does anyone have more details about Tallis, (I know he came from Cheshire), the rest of his crew and any missions to Sola/Stavanger this day? Who flew the other aircraft, and did they make it back?

    Sincerely
    Atle

  2. #2
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    Hi Atle
    RAF Coastal Command Losses, Vol 1 , Ross McNeill, shows 2 82 Sqn losses for this day but the details available suggest that both were lost over the sea. He does record F/Lt R E Tallis DFC as being buried in Sola Churchyard. The full crew were :-
    F/Lt R E Tallis DFC, pilot
    Sgt D G Shayler
    Sgt F E Davis
    The a/c was Blenheim IV, V6451 and was on an anti-shipping search and strike from Lossiemouth.The other a/c was Blenheim IV, V6256, UX-W, which is reported as lost without trace also on an anti-shipping operation. The crew were:-
    P/O D White pilot
    Sgt R C Hanson
    Sgt W G Busby
    Cpl H E Hollis
    They have no known grave
    42 Sqn also had a/c airborne on an op simply described as a "Strike" which might have aimed at ground targets. there are no losses reported other than a Beaufort that suffered Engine failure and ditched close to land with all the crew surviving
    Regards
    Dick
    Last edited by Dick; 21st April 2008 at 08:57.

  3. #3
    Cutstone Guest

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    Interesting. I just found out that the boot and foot couln't have been from this crash, but from the crash of Blenheim V5828 may 8th 1941. Peoples memory is a source one should use carefully. Do you Dick know where the Beaufort ditched?

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    Hi Atle
    From Ross' book the 42 Sqn Beaufort turned back toward base and ditched close to the Scottish Coast near Tentsmuir, Fife.
    Regards
    Dick

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    Hallo Atle
    For what it`s worth, this unusual incident is also mentioned in German sources dated back to 29. April 1941, but without any names or numbers...

    The text from "Seekommandant Stavanger" goes like this:
    "17:20 - Bombentiefangriff durch 2 Bristol Blenheim aus geringster Höhe auf die Insel Rott. Bei kettenbombenwurf geriet eine feindl. Maschine durch Fruhzündung der 5. bombe und stürtze ab. Besatzung mit maschine untergegangen. Kartenmateriell durch MAA-Boot "Björg" geborgen."

    Also worth mentioning is that only 5 minutes later, 6 Blenheims attacked a German convoy nearby, Minesweeper "M-110" and Vorpostenboot "Seefalke" claimed one downed Blenheim by Flak.

    Regards
    Erik E
    Last edited by Erik E; 29th September 2010 at 22:10.

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