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Thread: Plt Off D. A. Bruce, 92 Sqn, Circus 104, 2 October 1941

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    Default Plt Off D. A. Bruce, 92 Sqn, Circus 104, 2 October 1941

    According to (my edition of) FCL, 92 Squadron's Plt Off D. A. Bruce crash-landed near Ashford during Circus 104 on 2 October 1941 and was hospitalised.

    Endeavouring to establish his forename, I found that the only D. A. Bruce that was commissioned (well, the only one that I could find in the London Gazette) was 80213 Plt Off David Alistair Bruce, who was not commissioned until 2 December 1941 from Sgt 778654.

    Have I got the right D. A. Bruce?

    Thanks
    Steve
    41 (F) Squadron RAF at War and Peace, April 1916-March 1946
    http://brew.clients.ch/41sqnraf.htm

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    Steve,

    Agree that the only D. A. Bruce the LG coughs up is 80213. But the only D. A. Bruces that come up in Eng/Wales BMD 1914-1923 seem to be as below. The Lancaster pairing is – I would think – a duplicate. The 1917 one would make him 20 when the RAFVR was invented in 1937 – so that fits. But – Alistair, and Bruce, might just indicate Scottish birth. Over to the Scotland’s People experts!

    Surname First name(s) Mother District Vol Page
    Births Jun 1914 (>99%)
    BRUCE David A Ogilvie Lancaster 8e 1317
    BRUCE David A Ogilvie Lancaster 8e 1317A

    Births Jun 1917 (>99%)
    Bruce David A Hope Carlisle 10b 1004


    The only other ‘possible’ is:

    Births Mar 1919 (>99%)
    Bruce Duncan A Brown Peterbro' 3b 266


    7 FTS/FSTS was at RAF Peterborough (Westwood) at this time.

    HTH

    Peter Davies
    Last edited by Resmoroh; 26th November 2013 at 12:30. Reason: Keyboard/Digit incompatibility
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
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    Steve,

    This is your man:

    916776/(63439) P/O Ewen Anthony Guy Cameron BRUCE RAFVR.

    Col.
    Last edited by COL BRUGGY; 26th November 2013 at 14:41.

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    And there we all were feverishly hunting a D A Bruce, whilst – all the time - he was hiding under the name of E A G C Bruce! Nothing like it!! Does this not constitute ‘Foul Play’ under Rule 7, Section 23(a), Sub-Section 4(b(viii)) of the Forum, whereby all such similar erroneous informations shall be declared “Null & Void”, and the Provider thereof be returned to Square One under pain of having his/her internet download speed being reduced to lower than his/her upload speed?????

    Peter
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Kudos to Col for another great find. It is a cheap thrill when a little mystery is solved!

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    'Oley moley! Ah, E. A. G. C. Bruce, of course, that would have been my next guess! Not.

    I'm with Remoroh on this one - how could ANYONE know?! ...except Col, of course!

    Well done, Col, thank you very much. Any hints on your myth-breaking source?

    Thanks a lot
    Steve
    41 (F) Squadron RAF at War and Peace, April 1916-March 1946
    http://brew.clients.ch/41sqnraf.htm

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    Sorry, I omitted to thank Resmoroh (Peter) for all your work and time checking out the BMD's on my behalf. Thanks Peter!
    41 (F) Squadron RAF at War and Peace, April 1916-March 1946
    http://brew.clients.ch/41sqnraf.htm

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    Steve, et al,

    Can't take all the credit!

    "On 2 October (1941), the Biggin Hill Wing took off at 1200 hours to carry out a diversionary sweep routing Berck sur Mer-Abbeville-Le Treport in connection with Circus 104. Weather conditions were perfect with unlimited visibility, and as the wing proceeded north-east towards Abbeville a number of enemy aircraft could be seen manoeuvring high above. Of the three squadrons involved, 72 and 609 were at full strength, but 92 Squadron, who were flying at the lowest level, had only been able to put up a total of eight aircraft.

    While over France, 92's Blue section lost position with the rest of the wing and were considerably lower than they should have been. This was enough to prompt an attack, and within a matter of seconds Section Leader Flight Lieutenant J.W. 'Tommy' Lund (W3459). Sergeant K.G. Port (W3762) and Sergeant N.H Edge (W3137) had been shot down. None survived. Pilot Officer Tony Bruce, the remaining member of the quartet, was injured when a cannon shell exploded on top of the armour plating behind his head, sending fine metal splinters up into his neck and scalp. Despite this he was able to shake off his attacker and made it back across the Channel to crash-land near Ashford. Several pilots from 609 later reported that a 92 Squadron Spitfire had been seen trailing glycol prior to the attack which might account for Blue section becoming detached from the rest of the squadron. (Although some accounts have stated that 92 Squadron's aircraft were shot down by Fw 190s, it seems more likely that they fell to Me 109Fs of JG2. As yet, the only Fw 190s in service were with II./JG26, whose pilots did not put in any claims on this day).

    Wot's that you say? "That's not much help!"

    I then checked the index, voila! - Bruce, P/O E.A.G.C.

    See:
    Spitfire Mark V in Action:'RAF Operations in Northern Europe'.
    Caygill,Peter.
    Shrewsbury:Airlife,2001.
    pp.42-3 & 258

    Col.
    Last edited by COL BRUGGY; 27th November 2013 at 12:00.

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    Thanks Col

    However, according to the 11 Group ORB Appendix, Lund, Port and Edge's losses came about as one of the pilots of Blue Section suffered a glycol leak and headed home, accompanied by the other three pilots of the section. Bruce crash-landed and the other three failed to return. It states, "As the Wing came home, they saw about nine enemy aircraft off the French Coast, leaving them to suppose later that Blue Section had been 'jumped'. As the Wing turned towards the enemy aircraft, they disappeared". They were not really 'considerably lower than they should have been', as such.

    Thanks for the information; it is most helpful and appreciated

    Regards
    Steve
    Last edited by Steve Brew; 27th November 2013 at 12:17.
    41 (F) Squadron RAF at War and Peace, April 1916-March 1946
    http://brew.clients.ch/41sqnraf.htm

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    Steve,

    In fairness to Caygill, l did not quote his text fully. l will insert the missing text in the above post.Take another peek.

    My main aim was to identify Bruce, not to give a running commentary on the battle.

    Col.
    Last edited by COL BRUGGY; 27th November 2013 at 12:11.

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