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Thread: Punishments

  1. #1
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    Default Punishments

    I have a service record which shows two punishments, the first being 14 days CC [1944], the second being 21 days detention [1946].

    A few general questions:

    1. Would these punishments have been handed by Squadron Commanders (or by a higher authority)?
    2. What was CC?
    3. Would the detention have been "on station"?

    Any help would be appreciated

    Regards

    Pete
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

  2. #2
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    Default

    Pete, Hi,
    "CC" (during my Nat Svc) usually meant 'Confined to Camp' - Jankers!. It involved Loss of Priviledges (no visits to the NAAFI), Parading outside the Guardroom twice a day in various Uniforms (which had to be spotless!) and being inspected by the Orderly Officer and/or Station Warrant Officer. You had to do your 'normal day job', but you were also given a number of pointless tasks to keep you occupied (painting the coal black, cutting grass with scissors, etc, etc).
    Short periods of Detention might have been in the Guardroom Cells, but it was a pain in everybody's. Orderly Officers/Sgts had to inspect the Prisoner frequently, the Medical Officer had to inspect him, and a Padre of whatever religion had to be made available. Longer periods of Detention (and yr bloke's 21 days might have come into that category?) would have been carried out in a "Military Corrective Establishment" - or 'Glasshouse' as they were popularly known. The MAFL experts will be along to give you the fine detail - but this is a broad brush glimpse!
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Last edited by Resmoroh; 10th December 2013 at 12:22.
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

  3. #3
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    Default

    Peter

    Thanks for the response.

    My man, who was in one of the Airfield Construction Squadrons, was based in Hong Kong at the time of his 21 days detention; perhaps there was a detention centre of some description on the island.

    Interestingly he had been hospitalised the previous week!

    Regards

    Pete
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

  4. #4
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    Default

    Pete,

    There was, almost certainly, a Military Corrective Establishment in Hong Kong. I do not know it’s name – but there are those, on this forum, who will know! The only ones I know of (not from personal incarceration!!) were the ones at Colchester (The Glasshouse), and another at Shepton Mallet. During WW2 there would, I suggest, have been a number of such establishments scattered around the world to give Bed & B/fast to His Majesty’s Military Malefactors! Somebody will know!

    The Airfield Construction Sqns in WW2 were, by and large, a fairly hard lot. They used a lot of brawn in their tasks – not unlike the Pioneer Corps in the Army!!

    As to who could Award what Punishments depended, basically, on the rank of the Officer(s) taking the Charge (RAF F 252!), or those taking a Court(s) Martial. I know not the detail, but it will – never fear – be in MAFL. And there are those who know MAFL. They will be along shortly!

    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Default

    Hi Pete

    This was in some notes from an Admin Course my grandad took in June '45.

    "Maximum Powers of Punishment of RAF Personnel. Appendix II. (This table must be read in conjunction with K.R. & A.C.I. Paras 1138-1152)"

    Unfortunately I haven't appendix I or what it was appended to but I hope it will be of some use.

    Rgds

    Pete
    Last edited by pete102; 14th December 2013 at 19:15. Reason: Can't get thumbnail to post!

  6. #6
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    Default

    Thanks Pete.

    What a fascinating document!

    Regards

    Pete
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

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