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Thread: Royal Navy Casualty Signal Form Codes

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    Default Royal Navy Casualty Signal Form Codes

    I now have ADM 358/3023 which has allowed me to id the crews of Swordfish P4009 and L2774
    involved in collision on November 25, 1939

    However, the signal is in 'code' for each aircraft is listed as thus

    A) Aircraft Serial and Engine Number: Eg Swordfish P4009 Pegasus 3 35361/N128584
    B) Squadron Number: Eg 810 Sqn
    C) Location and date: 23 48 S 3 21 East 25th Nov 1939
    D) Pilot Name X 1: Eg. A/Lt RN A W Stewart - Not Injured
    E) Crew Names X n: Ldg Airman L M Lloyd FAA/FX76328 Not Injured, William Freik AB P/SSX 13512 Pass not injured
    F) Circumstances: Collision occurred while climbing in cloud prior to carrying out ALT
    G) (1)Yes (2) Yes by Lloyd
    H) (1) No (2) No
    I) What happened to aircraft: A/C Sank


    what is the code for G) and H) I have an idea what G) may be but H) no idea

    thanks paul

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    Looking at the ones I copied this is what I make of G & H.

    G) Investigation - Cause, 765C (Yes/No), AIB/BoI (Yes/No)
    H) Damage Assessment - Carried out (Yes/No), Salvaged (Yes/No)
    Alan Clark

    Peak District Air Accident Research

    http://www.peakdistrictaircrashes.co.uk/

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    Alan thanks for that can you tell me what the Cause code 765C
    And AIB and BoI stand for?

    Thanks Paul

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    The cause was written in (an example being "Bad Weather"), I took 765C to be Form 765C, four sided accident record form, I didn't know the Navy also used those, but seemingly they did as they refer to them, AIB = Accident Investigation Branch, BoI = Board of Inquiry, the Navy reports I've seen were titled that way, unlike the RAF Court of Inquiry but they amounted to the same thing.
    Alan Clark

    Peak District Air Accident Research

    http://www.peakdistrictaircrashes.co.uk/

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    Default Casualty Signal

    Hello Paul and Alan

    King's Regulations of the Royal Air Force 1942, but I am unsure if the Navy / Admiralty used the same?



    The RAF War Manual A.P. 1301 has layouts of some of the Casualty Signals which vary according to the differing Notes and Messages in the Appendix, that were used?

    Mark
    Last edited by Mark Hood; 30th January 2014 at 22:29.

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    Mark Thank you that is exactly what I was after it confirms Admiralty (at least in 1939) used same form as the RAF

    g) i) Were the personnel equipped with parachutes, ii) Were the parachutes used
    h) Did fire break out I) in the air ii) on the ground

    which conforms with the above G) (1)Yes (2) Yes by Lloyd
    H) (1) No (2) No

    Lloyd used a parachute

    I will get back to this incident!

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    I have OCR/transcribed the relevant section for future reference:

    The RAF War Manual A.P. 1301 has layouts of some of the Casualty Signals which vary according to the differing Notes and Messages in the Appendix


    SECTION VII.—REPORTS OF CASUALTIES TO PERSONNEL.
    2309. Casualties in Time of War.—(a) Casualties in time of war will be reported in accordance with the procedure laid down in R.A.F. War Manual, Part II, Chapter XIII, but such procedure will not be brought into force unless and until instructions are received from the Air Ministry.
    (b) References to " active service" and "enemy action " in the ensuing paras. relate only to casualties occurring in warlike operations. on a minor scale conducted under administrative conditions applicable to time of peace.
    2310. Flying Casualties.—1. Casualties to personnel caused by flying accidents (as defined in para. 1326, clause 1) , and on active service due to enemy action while flying, will be reported by the unit to personnel involved belong, by W/T telegram, or cable, to the Air Ministry. The report will be marked " Immediate " and commence with the word " Casualty " and will include the following details:—
    (a) Type, and number of aircraft.
    (b) Unit to which aircraft belongs.
    (c) Place, date and time of accident.
    (d) Particulars of pilot or pilots, including—
    Full name and rank, and official number of an airman; whether killed, missing, dangerously, severely, or slightly injured or not injured; if dangerously or seriously injured, state briefly the nature of the injuries sustained; whether or not next-of-kin has been informed; name, relationship, and address of next-of-kin; name and address of hospital, if admitted.
    (e) Particulars of crew and/or passengers, giving, for each person, information as in (d) and duty on which employed. (A " passenger " is any person who is not a member of the normal flying crew of an aircraft.)
    (f) Nature of duty on which aircraft engaged, and cause of accident, if apparent; if obscure, state "Cause of accident obscure." (In either case any useful information which gives an indication of the nature of the accident should be included.)
    (g) (i) Were the personnel equipped with parachutes? (ii) Were the parachutes used?
    (h) Did fire break out (i) in the air; (ii) on the ground?
    Where more than one aircraft is involved particulars should be given in respect of all the personnel of each aircraft. When a fatal casualty occurs in an overseas command or at sea a second telegram will be dispatched by the unit as soon as possible after that referred to above, containing a condensed narrative version of the casualty together with any further details which may be readily available and which the relatives may desire to have. This telegram will also commence with the word " Casualty."
    2. As soon as possible after the event a report will be rendered by Post to the Air Ministry giving a short account of the occurrence, stating Whether a court of inquiry is being held or not, and any particulars available regarding other matters (e.g. removal to hospital) upon which the Air Ministry should be informed. The purpose of this report is that the Air Ministry may be in early possession of details without awaiting a full report; the report should therefore not be delayed until the result of the court of inquiry (if any) is known.
    3. Changes in the condition of an injured officer or airman will be reported in accordance with paras. 2315, clause 3, and 2316, clause 1.
    4. A court of inquiry will be held when necessary under para. 1328 and proceedings disposed of as directed in that para.
    5. See para. 2317 as to additional reports in regard to airmen.
    6. Casualties to personnel caused by non-service flying accidents will be reported as in para. 2311.

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    Default RAF Casualty Signals 1940 & 'F.B.' Meant Operational Flying or Accidents

    Hello Paul, Alan and All

    In post #5 was the procedure for the layout of a Casualty Signal, given in the King’s Regulations for the Royal Air Force 1942 (same in pre-war copies).

    AIR 81 Samples Seen Have A Slightly Different Layout
    Despite the Casualty Signal layout in Post #5 being from the 1942 RAF King’s Regulations, a couple of AIR 81 Personal (P Serial) Casualty Files (AIR 81 Casualty Packs) looked at, use the different layout in A.P. 1301.

    A couple of AIR 81 files in 1940, specifically made reference to the report being conducted in accordance with A.P. 1301.

    Casualty Signal Prefix F.B. Does Not Mean Flying Battle
    There is a reference to the Signal pre-fix “F.A.” and “F.B.” with an explanation.

    F.B. does not mean ‘Flying Battle’, it meant operational flying or accidents (see the page marked Page 3).

    Page 2


    Page 3


    Page 1
    Last edited by Mark Hood; 14th May 2015 at 10:51.

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