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Thread: School of Musketry, RAF Cosford

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    Default School of Musketry, RAF Cosford

    Hi all,

    I would like to ask if anyone can told me any info about this unit - what kind of training was held there during the WWII?

    TIA

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

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    Possibly connected: several RCAF fighter squadron diaries from the war talk about the pilots undertaking regular "skeet shooting" training. I think the purpose was to introduce them to the idea of leading a moving target.

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    Hi Bill,

    thanks for your post. I was expecting someting like that. BUT my problem was that my man who was posted there was a bomber pilot! I have a note in his record that he passed there course with result 79,6%.

    Any ideas what he was doing there?

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

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    Pavel, et al,
    If you want a laugh then read http://www.rifleman.org.uk/The_Swift...ing_rifle.html. The is a reference to the RAF School of Musketry near the end. The Army thought the whole thing a big joke. And their comment that RAF groundstaff couldn't hit a cow's backside with banjo is quite amusing. But apart from this your Bomber Pilot may have been about to be posted to one of the SD Sqns, and thus needed to be "up to speed" with all sorts of small arms?
    Wooden rifles!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    I hate to admit it but I used this training rifle when I was in the ATC, back in the 60's.
    I haven't thought of this for 40 odd years and there it is on the forum...amazing. I must send this article to my brother....he was also ATC then went on to be a hunter, phantom and then Nimrod pilot.... Thanks.

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    I think that the history of musketry in the RAF was based on British Army customs and mores, and had more to do with being an officer and a gentleman than anything practical in the pursuit of flying. Musketry was also a very popular recreational sport in the RAF and this probably had much to do with spreading the shooting ethic (term not to be misconstrued here!) It was considered a "manly" sport and was also thought valuable for building unit moral and general prestige, and remember that the RAF annually competed for the top marksman in the Commonwealth (or the old Empire) with the RN and Britsh Army units (and probably the RM too). Also, contrary to my introductory statement, shooting could be indulged in by officers AND lower ranks, and teams entered into inter station or command competitions could be a very mixed bunch, comprising everyone from wing commanders and squadron leaders (and occasionally higher ranks) to AC2 snooks from accounts section. In fact this would largley still be the case in Commonwealth air forces around the world (and no doubt most armed forces generally).
    Military training of all Commonwealth uniformed personnel always included target practice with rifles, and aircrew in wartime (and peace) were also obliged to attend regular skeet shooting (a sport disigned to improve co-ordination, aim and lead required to hit and bring down pheasant, grouse and the like, with obvious application for larger "birds". Pistol shooting was also required for aircrew, as their sole defensive weapon when separated from their aircraft and on the run was a handgun, although this weapon always had serious limitations in the real world and was often discarded when the airman was "on the run" as its retention could often result in its owner being shot out of hand as an "Armed combatant".
    David D

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    Hi all,

    many thanks for your posts. Well now understand what for this school was.
    But I am still not able to understand why fully trained bomber pilot spend there nearly month in the early 1941 instead being posted to the bomber squadron directly...

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

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